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Thread: Shun blue steel knives

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    "San mai" and "single bevel" don't mix.
    Yes,I should have known

  2. #22

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    "San mai" and "single bevel" don't mix.
    As a purely academic point....Not certain how you are using the term...but my understanding is that San Mai is where the cladding does not cover the spine. In any case, single bevel can have cladding.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  3. #23
    "San-mai" means three pieces. "Mai" is a term used in Japanese to count thin or flat items, such as sheets of paper, or slices of bread. That's why "san-mai" is used to described double-beveled clad knives because there are three layers - two outside layers and the core.

    I guess single beveled knives could be made with three layers and thus, be "san-mai", but, from what I understand, traditional single beveled knives are made with two layers.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  4. #24
    Senior Member quantumcloud509's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    yeah... they are new... i saw some early ones here in LA a while back. the look is just a look. thats what shun does best

  5. #25
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    Heat treatment as most would agree is very important.Since I have sharpened & repaired quite a few VG-10 Shuns,chipping broken tips etc.I attributed it to knife abuse.I still think that abuse is the major cause of chipped & dull Shuns.

    I was wondering if because they produce large numbers of Shuns,that perhaps their HT is not as good as it could be.Yeh they are good for shiny hammered look wt. damascus patterns.Most have too much rocker for my taste.At least that Fake Kiritsuke Gyuto has a flatter edge profile than most Shun's.

  6. #26
    I still don't understand why Shuns get so much hate here. Half of us probably got into Japanese knives with either Shuns or Globals I think it's great that they are out there and so readily available. Yes when you become more knowledgable you find that there are better knives for less money but they serve as a great bridge for many of us who end up finding joy in using Japanese kitchen knives. Yes they are over priced for what they provide but that just shows what good marketing can do. Most here agree that you could have a custom maker such as Devin or Pierre make a knife just as good as a Kramer for a tenth the price but Kramer doesn't get half the flak Shuns get.

  7. #27
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    it's just that there are more people who own shuns and globals than knife knuts.

    that's why chipping is more prevalent since there are more shuns and globals around.

    it's just that we know better.

    =D

  8. #28
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    I have a Global that I bought off a member for "testing purposes", and I determined that I actually don't hate using a Global, and in fact, they are solid knives; This is despite what we all say about them! Shuns, from my experience, are just as good, but as we all know, the profile is "off".

    I attribute the chipping issues seen with Shuns with the fact that a hard, more brittle knife (like anything in the 60hrc range) is not suited for rocking, yet Shun's profiles generally are. Rocking leads to lots of excess force going into the board, and this is compounded by lateral torsion, wobbly contact and a false sense that the blade will go through just about anything. To sum it up, I don't think their HT is awful (done en masse, yes), but when you combine a less than perfect HT with hard steel, a rock promoting profile and the hands of the (even slightly) ignorant, you get big, wicked chips and a reputation for chipping.

    Regardless, I'm happy to see "the big boys" paying attention and making an effort to enter this market. Zwilling has done a fine job, and everyone else is trying to follow suit.
    09/06

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  9. #29
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    I find it odd that Globals have been the same for a decade, yet there's a new Shun line everyday. A guy I know just payed a pretty penny for a Shun Fuji gyuto. The handle is spectacular, the steel is great, the blade finish is gorgeous; but there is no taper to speak of, a thick tip, odd profile, and too thick behind the edge....they are so close. Maybe instead of trying to lure those more knowledgeable with new steels, they should focus on actually making a good knife.
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  10. #30
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    Yeh,most damage is fr. abuse,not the steel or HT.Alot of persons go from cheap stainless or Henkles etc.which are softer steel that can take more banging around than a thinner harder Japan blade.When the tip of a shun breaks off prying apart frozen chix thighs you can't blame it on the knife.

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