Quantcast
Just for two - Page 2
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 41

Thread: Just for two

  1. #11
    Senior Member cclin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    1,077
    Quote Originally Posted by stevenStefano View Post
    Well a 240 wa-gyuto will be about 220 on the edge surely so just get a wa-240?
    that depends.... some wa-gyuto measure from heel to tip, some from handle to tip!

    I'm using 165mm or 180mm santoku cook simple meal for two...
    Charles ***[All statements I made here only my personal opinion and nothing more!]*** & Please bare with me for my crappy English!!

  2. #12
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    3,467
    it seems to be mostly knives from Sakai that don't measure edge length, on the wa-knives.

  3. #13
    Senior Member quantumcloud509's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Spokane, WA aka Spokanistan, or Spoklahoma, or...
    Posts
    1,234
    I LOVE my 270 Takeda Guyoto because it does 3x the work in the same amount of time a 210 would.

  4. #14
    Senior Member ChiliPepper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    168
    Probably going against the tide here but I'm also home cook preparing food for two every day on a home-sized benchtop and find my 210 gyuto absolutely sufficient for everything. Just switch to a suji for slicing tasks: more efficient and a good excuse to buy another knife

  5. #15
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5,005
    Turns out ChiliPepper's a genius! . I used to be more in the 210 camp, but since I've gotten used to 240s, I'd have trouble deciding, when cooking at home. Since I'm in a position that allows me to use what I feel like using that day, I do just that. However, my next custom would still be the 225, if I "had to choose". To be honest, a 180 petty can do almost everything I need it to, at home, and I often go for one of my three that size, because I enjoy using them.

    I guess it's all just a matter of preference. For what it's worth, around here, 240 is accepted as the "standard sized gyuto".
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

  6. #16
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,871
    The extra length allows me to make a real flat section with a strong symmetric edge for rougher tasks, without interfering with the normal use.

  7. #17
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Clayton, NC- surrounded by lots of trees
    Posts
    2,082
    A longer knife requires one to lift the knife less when rocking. It also adds weight, which offsets the pressure one must exert. There is also usually added thinness at the tip. That being said, I use a 210 gyuto and a santuko at home, and 240's at work. My experiences with 270's and 300's is they tend to feel unwieldy....
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    1,405
    +1 on no chop.

    =D

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    WildBoar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    NoVa
    Posts
    2,006
    I use primarily 240s (home cook). My wife has graduated from 150s to a 210, but has recently started to play with a 240 every now and then. The main reason the 210 is her 'go to' is the size of her cutting board; she feels the 240 is a bit big when she is manuvering around small piles of cut-up stuff. The cutting board I use is bigger (18x24), and I have no problem with 240s or the 270.

    I'd say if you have a 12x18 cutting board you probably don't want to go any bigger then a 210. If you have a 16x22 you can use a 240, but it probably depends on your 'board management'. With an 18x24 you can use just about anything.

    The whole goal (for us, at least) is to minimize the prep time. That makes it easier to cook on a regular basis. For me that translates to a longer knife on a bigger board, and for her it's a shorter knife on a smaller board -- although she did indicate the other night that her board is beginning to feel a little small...
    __________
    David (WildBoar's Kitchen)

  10. #20
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,090
    Quote Originally Posted by David Metzger View Post
    I know a 240mm Gyuto is more efficient and in some ways easier than a 210mm, but would you still suggest a 240mm for a home cook that usually cooks for just two people.
    The listed edge length is a rough guideline at best and an outright fallacy at worst. The only reason we talk about edge lengths like 210-240-270 so often is that, by and large, we all shop online and edge length is the most easily measured and quantified property; unfortunately, this lends much more importance to the property than it deserves. I have a "210" on my knife rack with an edge length of 223, recently played with a "240" that had an edge length of 225, and am confident I'm far from alone in this experience.

    Besides, profile and geometry make the knife, not edge length. 30mm (give or take 15mm randomly in either direction) is meaningless in the context of a board knife: the profile will dictate how much you can use at once and the geometry will dictate how heavy it feels.

    Don't let the nerds fool you. Lefty can talk all day about how rad a 225 is over a 210, but bear in mind that 15mm is about the length of your thumbnail. It's completely negligible.


+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts