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Thread: Just for two

  1. #21
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    I think you should stay below 180-210.
    most knife user prefer knives in that range. also think of the size of the things you are cutting. If your cutting three heads of romaine at a time well a 210 might not be the best choice but if you are more likely cutting smaller things no need to be swinging around extra blade/weight.
    smaller knives are also easier to maintain and learn on because they take less time to sharpen all things being equal. the less time time spent sharpening the less time to be fatigued and make mistakes.
    goodluck whatever you choose to do.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by WildBoar View Post
    I'd say if you have a 12x18 cutting board you probably don't want to go any bigger then a 210. If you have a 16x22 you can use a 240, but it probably depends on your 'board management'. With an 18x24 you can use just about anything.
    Jeez, makes me feel odd as my main board is just 20cmx40cm... Had to convert the 12"x18" you mentioned, and that's 30cmx46cm - so significantly bigger than mine. Still, my main gyuto is a 240 and it's snug for me on that board, but it's all I have space for on my minute countertop and I cope. Half the time I'm using the tip area and doing details, and if I'm using the middle and back to chop or rock or push then I go at an angle along the board. Actually, I'm fine and I'd rather go to a nakiri or petty or another type of smaller knife than switch to a smaller gyuto which would just seem too 'mini' to me.

  3. #23
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    two weeks ago i was using a 300mm suji at a friend's house on a plastic board that might have been 4x7. board size doesn't matter, it's all the user. i like longer knives because i get more efficient slices.

  4. #24
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Vertigo is somewhat right. But I'm not a nerd...far from it, actually

    It does depend on the knife, balance point, etc. However, since we're generalizing, an giving general guidelines, and answering directly to what the OP asked, I still say 225 is the way to go. The best part of all of this, is we're all answering this question based on our PERSONAL PREFERENCE, and experiences. Really, what I write doesn't mean much, but it gives the OP some food for thought...preferably cut with a 225.

    **mic drop**
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  5. #25
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    ^^ (Cutty Sharp) your 8x16 board is probably small enough that you can cut something, pick up the board and push the cuttings into a bowl, then put the board back down and cut something else. I guess once you get a board a little bigger it's more of a PITA to pick it up like that. For me, I can prep faster when I have storage room on the board surface, and transfer all the cuttings after I am done with the knife (or after I've amassed enough of a pile that I run out of working area on the board).

    My mom has existed with a board about the size as yours for quite a few years. Whenever we go over there and help w/ dinner prep, it is a royal pain to work on that tiny board. Once you get used to having a bit of real estate it is hard to go without. It takes me more time to do the prep on that small board, and in the end I want to get it done as quickly as I can. Since we have the counter space at our house (and I realize not everyone does), bigger is better. In fact I will be under pressure soon to hand my board over to my wife and get a bigger one for my work area.
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  6. #26
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    my comment was only about knife size vs board size. a bigger board is, in most ways, much nicer than a smaller board, but a small board doesn't mean you can't effectively use a big knife. i have a 15x20 and a 14x18 board, one on my island and one on my main counter, and i wish both were bigger.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by WildBoar View Post
    ^^ (Cutty Sharp) your 8x16 board is probably small enough that you can cut something, pick up the board and push the cuttings into a bowl, then put the board back down and cut something else. I guess once you get a board a little bigger it's more of a PITA to pick it up like that. For me, I can prep faster when I have storage room on the board surface, and transfer all the cuttings after I am done with the knife (or after I've amassed enough of a pile that I run out of working area on the board).

    My mom has existed with a board about the size as yours for quite a few years. Whenever we go over there and help w/ dinner prep, it is a royal pain to work on that tiny board. Once you get used to having a bit of real estate it is hard to go without. It takes me more time to do the prep on that small board, and in the end I want to get it done as quickly as I can. Since we have the counter space at our house (and I realize not everyone does), bigger is better. In fact I will be under pressure soon to hand my board over to my wife and get a bigger one for my work area.
    Man, having that real estate is but a dream for me, as it'd take up all my counter top with a nice board. I have a one that size, but it's employed as a top on rack. Actually my board tends to have enough length that that I can push 1 maybe 2 things to the side, while handling another one. Still recovering from some distant memories of working on the line, having few time pressures cooking at home feels like such a luxury and my wife doesn't get impatient either, so this also helps to cope with the lack of space. Traditionally, if things aren't ideal, I also tell myself that this is a good way to improve technique or imagination, which is true.

    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    my comment was only about knife size vs board size. a bigger board is, in most ways, much nicer than a smaller board, but a small board doesn't mean you can't effectively use a big knife. i have a 15x20 and a 14x18 board, one on my island and one on my main counter, and i wish both were bigger.
    Ooo ... luxury!

  8. #28
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    I def give you pro guys credit for getting a lot done in very small spaces.
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  9. #29
    Senior Member DeepCSweede's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Vertigo is somewhat right. But I'm not a nerd...far from it, actually

    It does depend on the knife, balance point, etc. However, since we're generalizing, an giving general guidelines, and answering directly to what the OP asked, I still say 225 is the way to go. The best part of all of this, is we're all answering this question based on our PERSONAL PREFERENCE, and experiences. Really, what I write doesn't mean much, but it gives the OP some food for thought...preferably cut with a 225.

    **mic drop**
    **Pick up Mic**
    Yeah - well Salty's board and his knives are bigger....

    **drop Mic**

  10. #30
    I'm a home cook, have big hands and I wouldn't go any larger than 254mm (10")--my current go-to knife is 250mm.

    With that said, I also wouldn't go with anything shorter than 210mm for my main task knife.

    So 210-254mm is where I stand with a slight bias towards the longer knife. In practice, the difference isn't so great.

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