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Thread: Recommend the perfect summer drink

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    I like Rieslings from Alsace but they cost an arm and a leg here. German's are definite crowd pleasers. Most of my faves come from MSR but it's hard to find a bad one lately.
    I know that vineyard specific rieslings are expensive, but when I went to Total Wine and More (in Redondo Beach) this weekend, I saw a bunch of non-vineyard specific rieslings from Trimbach, Zind Humbrecht and Hugel for relatively decent prices (around $15). The one maker from Alsace that I've had that's not as recognized as some of the bigger names that makes excellent stuff is Dirler.

    I second the recommendation for German rieslings from Mosel Saar Ruwer. Good stuff.

    Otherwise, good Bourbon on the rocks.
    Michael
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    I know that vineyard specific rieslings are expensive, but when I went to Total Wine and More (in Redondo Beach) this weekend, I saw a bunch of non-vineyard specific rieslings from Trimbach, Zind Humbrecht and Hugel for relatively decent prices (around $15). The one maker from Alsace that I've had that's not as recognized as some of the bigger names that makes excellent stuff is Dirler.

    I second the recommendation for German rieslings from Mosel Saar Ruwer. Good stuff.

    Otherwise, good Bourbon on the rocks.
    I grew up with German rieslings, but it looks like we drink the good ones in Germany... There has been a trend to produce sweeter rieslings over the previous years, but I think most of the ones consumed in Germany are still reasonably dry. We ship most of the sweet stuff to the US and GB There are times for a sweet riesling, and I also like a good riesling dessert wine, but as a refreshing drink in the summer I miss the dry ones. I also generally prefer Rheingau or Rheinpfalz wines over the MSR ones.

    The standard bottlings of the large Alsatian producers are o.k., especially the Gewuerztraminers. A great alternative are Austrian (NOT Australian) whites. Their dry whites made from the 'gruener veltliner' grape are excellent food wines. Unfortunately, they are also a bit pricy.

    Stefan

  3. #33
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    +1 on the Austrian whites. If I were to choose two whites to drink they would be from Austria and the Okanagan area of Canada. Great whites. I just had a Rotgipfler white from Austria that was very, very good and almost bought some more today. The only thing I am more addicted to than knife stuff are bottles of wine. I just bought two cases of white in prep for this summer (well -- actually just the last part of May). But I do need to get on my wine shipments before the weather turns hotter.

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

  4. #34
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    I don't see to many gruener veltliners. As a matter of fact, I've seen and tasted exactly two. I'm surprised you get much of anything in HI. What is it about the Rheingau/pfalz wines that you prefer them? I'd forgotten about the drier germans, I remember not having had too much difficulty finding decent trocken/halb-trocken offerings but they've sort of just disappeared, come to think of it. I didn't even notice.

  5. #35

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    Grain alcohol with rain water or distilled water...
    Though I could not caution all I still might warn a few; Don't raise your hand to raise no flag atop no ship of fools. - Robert Hunter

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    I don't see to many gruener veltliners. As a matter of fact, I've seen and tasted exactly two. I'm surprised you get much of anything in HI. What is it about the Rheingau/pfalz wines that you prefer them? I'd forgotten about the drier germans, I remember not having had too much difficulty finding decent trocken/halb-trocken offerings but they've sort of just disappeared, come to think of it. I didn't even notice.
    I think it depends on where you shop. I can name a few places that have trocken rieslings from MSR; I know I've seen a few places with Rheingau/Pfalz trocken rieslings as well.

    I appreciate Austrian Gruner Veltliners but the grapefruit/sour citrus flavor and white pepper flavors are unique and go well with certain foods. They're generally in the $15-$20 range here in California.

    One wine that I've also forgotten about (because prices have gone up) are Pinot Grigios from the Collio region in Italy. They're not the thin swill that many Pinot Grigios are.
    Michael
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  7. #37
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    I can't afford too many addictions, so wine is the one I gave up - I sold, drank or gave away my 800 bottle cellar before I moved to the US. Now I live with 100 bottles in my 2 small wine fridges, and the earth still moves and life continues And, to my surprise, we do have a very good wine selection out here, some even at very reasonable prices. Considering the climate and the value, I have mostly turned to NZ sauvignon blancs in whites and occasionally a nice rose, very few reds. Right now, one of my 50 bottle fridges is full with German dessert wines. I need to make more occasions to drink the good stuff...

    Hard to describe why I am not crazy about the Mosel wines. They have a specific note that I am not crazy about. I find the Rheingau/pfalz wines cleaner, crisper, But, of course, it is impossible to generalize like that. Within the Mosel-Saar-Ruwer region, I prefer the Saar wines. I think Doenhoff is easy to get in the US (at a price), he is the star in that region and produces some of the best German whites - period. But if you ever come across wines from Van Volxem - buy them They are mostly very slightly off-dry and IMHO one of the best values out there, perfect food wines with Asian foods.

    Since I moved out here 5 years ago, I haven't had many chance to keep up with the recent developments and new producers, but some have established themselves and there are a few reviewers in Germany whom I trust, that's how I try to stay in the loop. But as I said, many are not even available in the US. Oh, Leitz from the Rheingau region does export extensively into the US, he is also very high on my lost.

    Stefan

  8. #38
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    I shop at Crush Wine out of NY (via the internet). They have Van Volxem, and that is where I got my Rotgipfler too. They seem to have a pretty good selection of Austrian and German wines, so I will have to try one next time I buy from them.

    http://www.crushwineandspirits.com

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by apicius9 View Post
    I can't afford too many addictions, so wine is the one I gave up - I sold, drank or gave away my 800 bottle cellar before I moved to the US. Now I live with 100 bottles in my 2 small wine fridges, and the earth still moves and life continues And, to my surprise, we do have a very good wine selection out here, some even at very reasonable prices. Considering the climate and the value, I have mostly turned to NZ sauvignon blancs in whites and occasionally a nice rose, very few reds. Right now, one of my 50 bottle fridges is full with German dessert wines. I need to make more occasions to drink the good stuff...

    Hard to describe why I am not crazy about the Mosel wines. They have a specific note that I am not crazy about. I find the Rheingau/pfalz wines cleaner, crisper, But, of course, it is impossible to generalize like that. Within the Mosel-Saar-Ruwer region, I prefer the Saar wines. I think Doenhoff is easy to get in the US (at a price), he is the star in that region and produces some of the best German whites - period. But if you ever come across wines from Van Volxem - buy them They are mostly very slightly off-dry and IMHO one of the best values out there, perfect food wines with Asian foods.

    Since I moved out here 5 years ago, I haven't had many chance to keep up with the recent developments and new producers, but some have established themselves and there are a few reviewers in Germany whom I trust, that's how I try to stay in the loop. But as I said, many are not even available in the US. Oh, Leitz from the Rheingau region does export extensively into the US, he is also very high on my lost.

    Stefan
    Donhoff is excellent! I happened to buy two bottles on clearance (older vintage) for a great price a few years back. My girlfriend and I had it with terrine of foie gras. Foie gras and Riesling are one of the world's greatest food and wine matches. And the Donhoff was outstanding - it had great balance and good acidity, even though it was slightly sweet.

    Thanks for the Van Volxem and Leitz recommendation. I will definitely look for them.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  10. #40
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Just to make sure, the van Volxem wines are mostly off-dry, but they are beautifully balanced IMHO. I used to buy the simple Saar Riesling, their entry wine, by the case(s). After accounting for the exchange rate, the shipping and paying all the %$$%$% who add their profit in the US system, it's a little steep for an every-day wine IMHO, but still a nice food wine (Thai food!) - or a wine for sipping on the lanai in the summer.

    Stefan


    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    I shop at Crush Wine out of NY (via the internet). They have Van Volxem, and that is where I got my Rotgipfler too. They seem to have a pretty good selection of Austrian and German wines, so I will have to try one next time I buy from them.

    http://www.crushwineandspirits.com

    k.

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