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Grits. How high, is too high?
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Thread: Grits. How high, is too high?

  1. #1
    Senior Member JKerr's Avatar
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    Grits. How high, is too high?

    Out of curiosity, at what point would you say "That's enough" when it comes to grits.

    Example, I finish on a Kitayama and I don't see the need to go any higher than that for a kitchen knife. I've always been under the impression an edge should have (some) bite to it. After the point of, say 10k, does the sharpening (or polishing as may be the case) produce a negative result? For those of you who have used the likes of Shapton 16k or 30k stones or obscenely fine stropping compounds, do you feel it's justified in the results, or is it more to satisfy general knife nerdism?

    Cheers,
    Josh

  2. #2
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    right now i'm finishing on a naniwa green aoto followed by a couple passes on a strop. this is an experiment, but it has been a successful one, as it gives a good, easy shaving edge that lasts for a long time. i used to use a super stone 10k, and the Kit has long been my finishing stone, followed by a little stropping. the Gesshin 8k is a good stopping point if you want a more polished edge (the Gesshin gives a similar edge to the Kit, though it's more efficient and wears less, and might leave a more aggressive edge).

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    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Depends on the knife. Gyuto, honesuki, deba, sujihiki, petty 5k. Yanagiba I take to the kitiyama. I finish with different compounds depending on the knife as well.
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    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    I often will go up the progression just to polish the edge, but drop back down to a mid grit with a few backstrops to get that toothiness...
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
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    mr drinky's Avatar
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    I thought this thread was going to be about grits -- as in polenta.

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

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    miketayl0r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    I thought this thread was going to be about grits -- as in polenta.

    k.
    fell for it too haha

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    I think 4-6k is high enough for most kitchen knives--there is not much practical difference between a 4k, 5k and 6k stone.

  8. #8
    Senior Member JKerr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    I thought this thread was going to be about grits -- as in polenta.

    k.
    Wrong sub forum for that. Don't think I'd be the one to start a thread on it either, heard of Grits, but no idea what it is. Never seen them in Oz or back in Scotland, very American I assume?

    Oh, and cheers for the comments so far.

    Josh

  9. #9
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    I thought this was about grits too. And something else... muchies and well- whatever. ANYWAYS...
    Today is as good a day to die as any. Except for tomorrow. I have plans tomorrow.

  10. #10
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    An edge is a series of teeth. If you grind on a 10k+ grit stone until all the teeth are essentially the same size, you'll get a very smooth edge that will lose its aggressiveness rather quickly. If you don't polish out the teeth (or round your edge), you can go as high as you want. So, just think about the size, shape and direction of the teeth you are grinding into your edge. Keep in mind that different abrasives will leave different shaped teeth and different steels will respond differently to abrasion, as well and that may reflect on how your edge will degrade.

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