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Thread: Grits - who loves 'em?

  1. #21
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    Anson Mills are my favorite,followed by Nora Mills in Georgia. The staple breakfast growing up, was sausage and gravy over grits, or liver mush (or liver pudding) and grits. (Liver mush and liver pudding are pretty well confined to a small region of NC and SC. The difference between them is liver mush uses corn meal as a thickener, and liver pudding uses rice).
    Any grits from the grocery store is not worth eating, and cooking is kind of like the basics of doing bbq--low and slow. Soak overnight, and simmer slowly for at least an hour.

    Reed

  2. #22
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    Too...many....bears! Or is that too many beers? Looked at the avatars last night, saw a couple bears in a row, and thought "Why is Son answering his own question?"
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  3. #23
    Senior Member Keith Neal's Avatar
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    http://www.bradleyscountrystore.com/...tegory&path=59

    This is the real thing. Rarely served in "country cafes", though good restaurants may serve them. Creamy and delicious.

    It takes 1 to 1.5 hours cooking and stirring to prepare, which is why you don't find them very often. The 5 minute quick grits are just too easy, though nothing like the real thing.
    If you reach the age of 60 without becoming a curmudgeon, you haven't been paying attention.

  4. #24
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    Guys I tell you I have cooked white grits, I have cooked plain ol' yellow grits, I have messed with blue grits but the best I have found is here in Dear Ol' Kentucky. I found a family that mills yellow popcorn grits and let me tell y'all here they are the best I have ever had. A little browned onion with shrimp and some cheddar cheese mixed in, Oh my gosh Nellie on a hand car headin' down the holler!!!! They are good.

    PS some day I will tell you about corn flour that they do.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    A breakfast treat when we were kids was scrambled eggs, grits, and sausage from a smokehouse in Hahira, Ga. A real sprawling metropolis even now. I haven't been able to find anything like that sausage in years. It was a smoked sausage, softer than a pepperoni, but much firmer than fresh sausage. It was a coarse grind, and must have had some sugar in the mix because it would get kind of sticky on the outside when you fried it up. Excellent with grits--you'd have those creamy, buttery grits with smoky hunks of sausage with a crunchy, sticky casing. It was also wonderful on a piece of bread with strawberry jam smeared on it. Wish I could find something like it again. Puts me right back in the kitchen with my grandmother.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  6. #26

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    See, Nora Mills and Logans Turnpike Mill and Smelters Grist Mill are all local to me. Still don't like grits.

    -AJ

  7. #27
    OK I need to know more about these "yellow popcorn grits"

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post
    A breakfast treat when we were kids was scrambled eggs, grits, and sausage from a smokehouse in Hahira, Ga. A real sprawling metropolis even now. I haven't been able to find anything like that sausage in years. It was a smoked sausage, softer than a pepperoni, but much firmer than fresh sausage. It was a coarse grind, and must have had some sugar in the mix because it would get kind of sticky on the outside when you fried it up. Excellent with grits--you'd have those creamy, buttery grits with smoky hunks of sausage with a crunchy, sticky casing. It was also wonderful on a piece of bread with strawberry jam smeared on it. Wish I could find something like it again. Puts me right back in the kitchen with my grandmother.
    Yummmm!

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post
    OK I need to know more about these "yellow popcorn grits"
    Ok let me put this in Geologist terms, I is one, white grits tends to be fine grain, yellow grits like a medium grains, but the popcorn grits are like coarse grains.

  10. #30
    So are we talking grinding popcorn kernel grade corn then because some are real tasty. This sounds very intriguing since we all are looking for the best possible taste and texture in the foods we cook.

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