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Thread: Photo of the Day

  1. #121
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    Thanks steeley, I'm really enjoying these.

  2. #122

    knyfeknerd's Avatar
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    Steeley, the "Hotties" rock!
    Keep 'em coming dude.
    Oh and I do like knives and cookery related stuff too!
    I wonder if we have enough to do a KKF Historical Hotties wall calendar?
    If "Its" and "Buts" was candy and nuts, we'd all have a Merry Christmas
    -Cleon "Slammin'" Salmon

  3. #123
    Senior Member marc4pt0's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=steeley;175089]Really nice menu from 1894 Thanksgiving .
    [IMG][/IMG]

    "American Cheese". Makes me picture this classic haute spread for the holiday, finished with some freshly unwrapped waxy pre-sliced yellow-orange Velveeta.

  4. #124
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    Marc4pt0 yea i saw that bit about American cheese.

    I think these is good time to find out what they meant by American cheese .
    Cheddar cheese was being made and exported to England as early as 1790
    and long before the anatto coloring was added to make it yellow so a white cheddar if you will.

    now the cheese we know now as American cheese was invented in 1911 and sold to John Kraft in 1920
    it can not be sold as cheese but Processed cheese .
    and Velveeta was invented in 1918 .

    this is a cheese company making the cheese one eat at a restaurant like that .
    1890
    [IMG][/IMG]
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  5. #125
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    Advertising knife 1890
    [IMG][/IMG]
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  6. #126
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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    British colonists made cheddar soon upon their arrival in America. By 1790, American cheddars were being exported back to England. The British referred to American cheddar as "American cheese", or "Yankee cheese", and post-Revolution Americans promoted this usage to distinguish their product from European cheese.[5] For example, an 1878 newspaper article in The New York Times lists the total export of American cheese at 355 million pounds per year, with an expected growth to 1,420 million pounds
    wikipedia. lol
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  7. #127
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    The Nutmeg has a long and wild history .
    Nutmeg is native to the Banda islands of Indonesia. When the Portuguese rounded the Cape of Good Hope in Africa in the late 1400s, they took control of the spice trade because they could transport nutmeg far more cheaply in the hold of a ship than it could be transported by caravan. Soon the Dutch became the predominant traders of this precious spice. At the time, the only source of nutmeg was on Run Island. Because the British also wanted in on the lucrative trade there were many struggles between the British and the Dutch over control of the Island.

    During the Napoleonic wars, the English finally gained control of Run Island and proceeded to plant nutmeg trees in Grenada and Zanzibar. This ensured that the British would not lose complete control of the Nutmeg trade should they ever decide to give up the island again.

    1690 Nutmeg grater NewAmsterdam, I think that screw is a little newer.
    [IMG][/IMG]

    Nutmeg was very sought after but only the well off could afford it. a LB. of nutmeg was worth seven fat oxen in the 1400

    1882
    [IMG][/IMG]

    In the 1600s, "the Dutch and the British were kind of shadowing each other all over the globe," explains Cornell historian Eric Tagliacozzo. They were competing for territory and control of the spice trade. In 1667, after years of battling, they sat down to hash out a treaty.

    "Both had something that the other wanted," explains Krondl. The British wanted to hold onto Manhattan, which they'd managed to gain control of a few years earlier. And the Dutch wanted the last nutmeg-producing island that the British controlled, as well as territory in South America that produced sugar.

    "So they [the Dutch] traded Manhattan, which wasn't so important in those days, to get nutmeg and sugar."

    And back then, the Dutch considered it a sweet deal.

    [IMG][/IMG]

    And if you never seen the fruit with mace on the nutmeg
    [IMG][/IMG]

    The fruit is edible it is often dried and taste of candied ginger.
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  8. #128
    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
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    Very cool!

  9. #129
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    U.S.S. Iowa 1901 galley.
    [IMG][/IMG]


    flying use to be so much fun.
    [IMG][/IMG]
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  10. #130

    knyfeknerd's Avatar
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    ummmmmm flying...................
    If "Its" and "Buts" was candy and nuts, we'd all have a Merry Christmas
    -Cleon "Slammin'" Salmon

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