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Thread: Gorgeous cutting board...but who makes it?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    It does look really thin. Maybe it's just the picture....
    It is too thin and likely to warp or crack over time. An optimal thickness for any board should be 2" and up. Also, grain layout and several species of wood used (might have different movement rate) makes this board less than desirable in my book.


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  2. #12
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    I have a multi wood board, but the woods are all within (if I remember correctly) 250 points on the janka scale to reduce the chance of warping.
    With the board in this thread in particular, there are mostly straight, end to end seams which make me suspect warping could be an issue, especially when coupled with the apparent thinness of the board.
    It's still beautiful!
    09/06

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  3. #13
    Still Plays With Blocks
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    Not one of mine. Walnut, cherry, mahogany maple and poplar. Hardwoods, except for the poplar. Obviously a hobbyist using left over scraps.

  4. #14
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    Janka scale has no relation to a woods stability. A Janka score is the amount of psi it takes to bury a steel ball w/ a set diameter halfway into a piece of wood. Most boards are end grain so Janka doesn't even factor here.Some woods like hickory are unstable while mosquito is super stable. Both have relative Janka hardness numbers. The only factor that sound be used in determining which woods are suitable are end grain stability ratios.

    Sorry, I used to wholesale exotic wood.

    Pesky

  5. #15
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    That's actually really cool info.
    Thanks Pesky!
    09/06

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  6. #16
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    I actually picked up a similar board to this off of Etsy from a craft woodworker for my wife to use as a sandwich/fruit slicing board. It won't last forever, but I absolutely loathe plastic cutting boards in general (like we need more plastic in our lives) so it's worth a shot...

  7. #17
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    When I was buying a board a while back I looked into hardness and also learned that Janka was testing the side and not the end of the wood, but all over the web they say there is a test for 'end hardness' too, but I could find no charts for end hardness. I did find a site where a bunch of exotic African woods had side versus end hardness comparisons, and the numbers were all over the place. Some end hardness numbers where higher than side hardness and others vice versa. But it was also hard to make heads or tails of the numbers. For example, here is a quote on teak: "The side hardness of teak...is in the range 3730 to 4800 newtons, while the end hardness is in the range 4150 to 4500 newtons." What does that tell me? Not much.

    Of course a knife is not a ball bearing, and in the end I just gave up thinking about it and used BoardSmith Dave's FAQs as a reference.

    k.
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  8. #18
    Seriously. I believe the correct course of action in those situations is "defer to the craftsman".

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sashae View Post
    I actually picked up a similar board to this off of Etsy from a craft woodworker for my wife to use as a sandwich/fruit slicing board. It won't last forever, but I absolutely loathe plastic cutting boards in general (like we need more plastic in our lives) so it's worth a shot...
    Etsy is a good place to find hobbyist boards like these.

    Btw, I have recently relaxed my board thickness standards and I am now buying a lot of thinner end-grain boards. I know they might not be as stable and have warping or cracking issues, but I am trying to replace my poly and Epicurean boards. At the end of the day, my wife and family don't haul out the big boards and always go for the smaller lighter boards. So instead of having them use my good knives on bad boards, I thought I would just get thinner knife friendly ones -- understanding that they may not last as long or have some problems.

    With that said, I bought one board (11x11) that was under and inch thick. It is made of ash and I have had no problems with warping or cracking, and my wife uses it all the time. I just make sure to take care of it well.

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  10. #20
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Yup! I'm going to trust that my boardmaker and David know their craft well enough to not steer us wrong!
    09/06

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