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Thread: Taking nice knife pictures

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    bprescot's Avatar
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    Taking nice knife pictures

    So after many years of apologizing for taking crappy pictures, I'm finally going to ask you guys how you do it right. I realize that I should probably be doing these outside when it's nice and light out, but what else am I missing? Is it my camera or camera settings? I've got a Canon SX100 that I just leave on "Auto" when snapping pics. Should I be setting it to something else?

    Any advice would be appreciated.

  2. #2

    JohnnyChance's Avatar
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    If you dont really know what you are doing, then auto will usually do a better job than you would. If you are trying to get up close detailed shots, putting it on a macro setting will help.

    You dont necessarily need to take pictures while outside, if you have a room that is very bright during the day, that will usually work. anywhere with lots of indirect natural light is good.

    There was a similar thread started a couple months ago, pretty sure it was here, but it could have been on another board.

  3. #3
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    you can take pics in a light box , but I think the camera is important too.
    You need to be able to adjust the aperture settings as well as ISO and exposure compensation.

    Your camera allows for those adjustments, you just need to play with them a bit to get the feel what works for you.

  4. #4

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    Unless you want to get into the science/discipline of photography, "auto" or "macro" is going to take the best pictures for you. I learned how to use a high end SLR a few years back, and then carefully produced the most faithful reproductions of several different subjects possible, and then took pictures on auto. The auto pictures were exactly the same and required zero time and effort.

    It's called a point-and-shoot because that's what you do with it!

  5. #5
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    So "Auto" is fine, but try to get natural indirect light. Well, that will have to be outside, as my place is dark as hell.

    Thanks for the advice guys.

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    A nice overcast day, with no distinct shadows, is perfect.

  7. #7

    PierreRodrigue's Avatar
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    +1 thats what I try for when I get pictures.


    Feel free to visit my website, http://www.rodrigueknives.com
    Email pierre@rodrigueknives.com

  8. #8

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    i have a light box, tripod and a prime macro lens but you dont need all that
    its all about light and how you control it
    you want lots of light but you dont want it to come from a point source (thats how you get the shadows and glare)
    most the time i set auto but depending on my need i do full man. setting and max out my depth of field

  9. #9
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    Well I'll have to play around with taking photos outdoors. Our place is an old 1910 bungalow, and the only lights are via lamp, making it generally dark, except for right by the lamp. But that's probably a point source which is why I get also sorts of glints and reflections and such. Thanks for the handy tips guys, I really appreciate it.

  10. #10

    ecchef's Avatar
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    I'd like to see a pic of your house! I love that 'Arts & Crafts' style. Ours is only a few years younger than yours.

    I also agree that point n' shoot is the way to go. Pretty much the only thing you need is a stable base of some sort...tripod, beanbag, whatever.
    Though I could not caution all I still might warn a few; Don't raise your hand to raise no flag atop no ship of fools. - Robert Hunter

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