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Thread: ceramic rod bad rap

  1. #21
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    mr drinky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WiscoNole View Post
    I can understand that, but at the same time, I can raise a burr and put a good edge on just about any carbon knife with a Gesshin 2k in literally 2-3 minutes.
    Without a doubt you are correct...but bringing out the stones, soaking, and putting stuff away takes way longer and the wife hates me doing it in the kitchen. When I perma-soak them in the garage in the summer though it is no problem. It's all quick then -- but summer is only so long

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

  2. #22

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    I dont have a rod, but I see where Chris is comming from. For me, when I say sharpening, I seldom go through a full grit progression. Usually I just make a few edge leading passes on either my Gesshin 5, or my Kityama followed by a cn strop. Its really only when I damage the edge, or get a new knife that I drop down below 2k.

  3. #23
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WiscoNole View Post
    I can understand that, but at the same time, I can raise a burr and put a good edge on just about any carbon knife with a Gesshin 2k in literally 2-3 minutes.
    During the middle of 100lbs of onions for French onion soup it's simply a matter of convenience to swipe two times on the rod vs setting up my stone and strop at work. I can and will do that too when time and situation allows. The rod still has a place in the kitchen though.
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  4. #24
    Senior Member quantumcloud509's Avatar
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    Any of you guys rod Takedas? What do you use?

  5. #25
    Senior Member ChiliPepper's Avatar
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    I'm really not sure about this one. Like many of you I used to go to the ceramic rod (DMT superfine) inbetween stone spa treatments but then I heard about rods not being quite good for jknives and, through trial and error (and a good dose of laziness ) I realized that a few stropping moves over my dry 5k stone do a pretty decent job to keep a good edge. Yeah, it tends to make the stone surface rather "slippery" or "glassy" on the long run but then when the next proper stone session occurs it's just a matter of reconditioning it as you would when flattening.Again, I'm a newbie and prob this is wrong by proper standards but it seems to work...

  6. #26
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    Totally agree almost all steel use in production kitchens often over time does more harm than good.Angle of spine is important,a lite sweep,not bearing down on the rod.I have found through trail & ERROR,that for me smooth polishing steels & smooth ceramics used correctly will prolong long cutting sessions until you can get to the stones again.

    Smooth steels & ceramics do have a place in the kitchen IF used correctly,rarely the case.Diamond steels are popular now,I have seen cooks wailing away on diamond steels at a high angle,trying to cut in a new edge,it always ends in failure.

  7. #27
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    I must also admit ive never owned a steel, but used to use other chefs, for awhile i was honing on the underside of ceramic/porcelain plates, it works quite well, just place it on a damp towel, gets a few weird looks from other chefs though.

    I always take my stones to work and am on the clock when i get the stones out for a session, soak them while i start the days prep/getting organised for the day, give them a touch up on 4k, have been de burring on cardboard lately.

  8. #28

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    I have a Mac rod and an Idhone ceramic. I like the Mac better and use it to keep[ my edges in line when I'm to busy to break out the stones. Seems to be a common theme for a lot of us. I like to sharpen I find it very relaxing, but don't always have the time.

  9. #29
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    I used to back strop on my higher grit shaptons. Now, where I'm at, its never actually been said we can't sharpen on stones during working hours. I just don't want to be the guy to find out...

    The bad thing about Country Clubs is theres different departments. And when you're caught up and would usually pull out the stones, there is sure to be another department that's in the $hit$, and needs help. The work is seemingly never ending. Of course I'm that guy that busts my butt to get set up(fine dining grill/ saute), and will immediately volunteer my services(usually to the banquet department). While others will chop parsley endlessly, until our first ticket is in....
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
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  10. #30
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    steel on ceramic rod, then strop on cardboard - quickest and easiest daily maintenance until next sharpening session which in pro kitchen seems an eternity because i never have the time nor the energy. you all know what i'm talking about, when you actually do have time, all you want to do is get everything done quick so that you can go home early or get out to the bars faster.

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