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Thread: What is your favorite sous vide dish?

  1. #41
    Senior Member Dieter01's Avatar
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    Deep-Fried, Sous-Vide, 36-Hour, All-Belly Porchetta.
    http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/12/t...porchetta.html

    AWESOME!

  2. #42
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Resurrecting an old thread. Ok, I just bought 4 pounds of chuck short ribs at Costco. I was thinking about making some of it just plain, only pepper, salt, thyme and olive oil; i also have some store bought braising liquids, one teriyaki style, the other some Indian flavor profile, and I wanted to use some of that on part of the meat. Not usually a fan of store bought stuff like that, but I have it and want to use it up.

    I keep reading about different temp and time combinations - any personal experiences? 48h at ??? temperature? Or longer? These are boneless pieces, probably 1/2# each. Aiming for tender but not mushy. Happy about all comments,

    Stefan

  3. #43
    Senior Member Brad Gibson's Avatar
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    Is the meat you bought chuck flap or short rib?
    "A recipe has no soul. You as the cook must bring soul to the recipe." -Thomas Keller

  4. #44
    Senior Member Brad Gibson's Avatar
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    Is there any reason that you wouldn't want to braise the short ribs in the oven? I feel like the best part of short ribs is the texture from nearly charred outside to a super tender inside. I think cooking it sous vide would just be a waste
    "A recipe has no soul. You as the cook must bring soul to the recipe." -Thomas Keller

  5. #45
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad Gibson View Post
    Is there any reason that you wouldn't want to braise the short ribs in the oven? I feel like the best part of short ribs is the texture from nearly charred outside to a super tender inside. I think cooking it sous vide would just be a waste
    You can still achieve those results sous vide.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
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  6. #46
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    I just kept reading raving reviews about 72h short ribs all over the place and thought it's about time I try it out. Well, I just remembered that I am a scientist, so I will probably just prepare the 6 pieces in different ways and see what comes out best. Btw, they are boneless chuck short ribs, 6 pieces = 4.5 pounds. I am currently by myself, so it looks like I will eat a lot of beef in a few days...

    Stefan

  7. #47
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    If it's vacuumed, pasteurized and refrigerated the shelf life is quite long.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  8. #48
    Senior Member rsacco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by apicius9 View Post
    Resurrecting an old thread. Ok, I just bought 4 pounds of chuck short ribs at Costco. I was thinking about making some of it just plain, only pepper, salt, thyme and olive oil; i also have some store bought braising liquids, one teriyaki style, the other some Indian flavor profile, and I wanted to use some of that on part of the meat. Not usually a fan of store bought stuff like that, but I have it and want to use it up.

    I keep reading about different temp and time combinations - any personal experiences? 48h at ??? temperature? Or longer? These are boneless pieces, probably 1/2# each. Aiming for tender but not mushy. Happy about all comments,

    Stefan
    I've done so many combinations using Costco boneless short ribs, as well as bone-in short ribs. I've tested cooking over a period of 24hr, 48hr, 60hr, and 72hr at 136-141 degrees F. Each one of the tests was followed up with a crust (maillard) using a blow torch. I like the taste and texture of the boneless short ribs when cooked for 48hrs @ 136 degrees F. The boneless short ribs turned out tender at a medium rare that is juicy but retains the meaty texture without getting soggy or mushy.

    I kinda got a bit OCD by running many sous vide tests using the Polyscience Chef Series, and ended up eating a lot short ribs. I spent a good portion of the winter months experimenting with Modernist Cuisine. Let me know how your ribs turn out.

  9. #49
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Thanks, looks like I may have read some of your threads on other forums, not knowing it was you then I will post results, this should be interesting

    Stefan

  10. #50
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    Theory is correct, again. All proteins will benefit from so degree of sous vide. But just because you can doesn't me it will make the end result better. You have to be very carful with white fish. But it really shines in tough cuts of meat. I've done:

    Ballottine Chicken
    Fresh sausages
    Bacon wrapped chicken
    oily and white fish
    Pig Belly and Jowls
    Whole Boston Butts for BBQ
    Every beef cut imaginable
    Goat, lamb and frogs legs

    All veggies
    Custard, mayonnaise, ketchup

    made pickles

    Made strawberry jam


    I'm just a home chef, but very passionate and have just about cooked my way through Modernist Cuisine at Home. My set up is a Vacmaster VP-112 and Polyscience supreme and a PID/Crock pot for long slow cooking.

    Remember that you don't have to completely cook your products sous vide. You can use the technique to get your product safely to a higher temp that 38 degrees. This way you loose less moisture because your core temperature is might higher when you start cooking.

    Example:
    Take fresh sausages (in vac bag) out of the refrigerator, put into a 140 degree water bath for an hour. They will be cooked through without any shrinkage. Chill completely. You can then, brown in a pan, bake in the oven or put back in the refrigerator for another day. The nice things is that because they're already cooked, when you give them the mallard, it won't take much heat to brown them and bring them up to 130 or so.

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