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New Years dinner help!
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  1. #1

    PierreRodrigue's Avatar
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    New Years dinner help!

    Ok, so dinner is at my place this year, we are all turky, and ham'ed out. So tonight I picked up a 16 pound prime rib. No I have never cooked a hunk of expensive beef this large, and am looking for help to nail this one. I was thinking o-oil, pink Him. Mountian salt, cracked black pepper and thyme. Then when done, pan drippings and red wine reduction.

    Let me know if this sounds like crap please. Also I need help with temps and times.

    Thanks in advance.

    Pierre


    Feel free to visit my website, http://www.rodrigueknives.com
    Email pierre@rodrigueknives.com

  2. #2
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    SpikeC's Avatar
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    Look for the James Beard recipe.
    Spike C
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  3. #3
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    The keys are a slow oven and a good thermometer to make sure you don't overshoot your target temp. If you have a programmable, like the Polder, it's easy - just set the desired temp, insert the probe and go about your business. If you only have a handheld, then you just have to pull the roast and check the temp frequently. And don't forget to let the meat get to room temperature first.

    http://www.amazon.ca/Polder-Original...6746943&sr=1-2

    http://www.cookingforengineers.com/r...ding-Rib-Roast

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    WildBoar's Avatar
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    Pierre -- you have the basics down. My family likes to supplement that by putting a bit of garlic in as well (slice garlic cloves to ~1/8 inch slices and insert them in slits you cut into the meat). I usually use my Rodrigue parer or petty for cutting the slits
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  5. #5
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    Season well.Seal it in a hot pan or Bbq plate first to get some nice caramelisation first.Sit the meat on a trivet of some kind-chopped root veg,bones,meat trimmings or a cake rack.Roast in a slow oven,even as low as 60c(but it will take a long time).Basically the higher the temp the more prone it will be to drying out and the greater the loss in yield .Give it another light salt and rest covered in aluminimum foil in a warm place for at least half an hour.Check internal temperature with a probe if you have one.Otherwise insert a metal skewer 30 seconds or so and if it feels warm on the back of your hand it will be rare-ish.For an idea of temperatures you can download app from Google play store which are free and handy to have around.I personally love Roast Beef with whipped cream flavoured with a tablespoon or two of horseradish cream(or preferably fresh grated if you can get it)..

  6. #6
    Senior Member Notaskinnychef's Avatar
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    make sure you rest the meat, so many people don't do this and then the juices are lost on the board. tent/rest it for at least 15-20 mins (more on bigger cuts) and you will notice a difference, even an overcooked steak or something can be salvaged by letting it rest.

  7. #7
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    i would open it up and incorporate some fat into the meat. i could slice it up into a big flat square then add the herbs and seasonings in that way, and some fat, maybe bacon or pork fat or even chicken/duck (or whatever bird ya got) or do both!, then roll it up. tie it up into a big roll butcher style and sear it good then stick it in the oven lowwwww and slow. then do the pan dripping sauce.

    i would cover it up during the low and slow process then kick it up a couple notches uncovered for an hour rotating every 30 minutes to make an even browning.

    then rest it for a good 30 minutes (imho, since it's a big chunk of meat).

    =D

  8. #8
    Senior Member Duckfat's Avatar
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    The seasonong looks good but I would skip the thyme as it can get bitter and use rosemary instead.
    Who you jivin' with that Cosmik Debris?

  9. #9

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    If it were me I'd cut it into three pieces. Everyone I know likes at least a piece of the crispy end. It will also make it easier to deal work with. Cut the bone away so you can season the meat on all sides and tie the roast back together. This will also lessen the cooking time and the thyme won't get bitter. At 5-6lbs I put mine into a 400 degree oven for one hour then turn the oven off and leave it alone for 3 - 3.5 hrs. for perfect medium rare pink end to end. It will be rested by that point so you can turn the oven back on to reheat it some without damage and it will slice nicely. The bone is already separate for those who like to eat off the bone or use them for stock another day.

    Good luck with it -

  10. #10
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    I always use the low and slow--200-225 F until internal temperature is where you want it--but while it's resting, i crank the oven up to about 450 F and then stick it back in the oven for just a few minutes to crisp up the outside (it doesn't take long before the fat starts sizzling.) I grew up with the "20 minutes per pound at 350" approach, but once I tried low & slow, I've never gone back. It's more forgiving, too--if you get busy with the holiday cheer and don't catch your roast exactly where you want it, you've got more time with it in a medium rare zone before it gets overcooked.

    I mix olive oil, black pepper, a little ground allspice, a ground bayleaf or 2, celery salt, & garlic powder, and maybe some sea salt (depending on my mood) into a paste, rub the meat down with it & wrap it tightly in plastic wrap first thing in the morning on the day it gets cooked it so it sits in the seasoning for several hours. It's good on the meat, but it will make your house smell WONDERFUL while that hunk o' beef is slow cooking.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

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