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Safe way to round the spine on Damascus gyuto
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Thread: Safe way to round the spine on Damascus gyuto

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    Safe way to round the spine on Damascus gyuto

    The damascus comes up to the edge of spine that needs rounding

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    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    what do you mean by "safe?"

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    What kind of construction? Got pics? If it needs rounding, you have no choice but to round it. Stick it in a vise with something between the blade and the vise to avoid scratching. Then go to town with sandpaper all along the spine where you want to round it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    what do you mean by "safe?"
    Not scratching the Damascus.

    59 do you use wet dry paper,this is VG-10 steel,what grit do you start with?

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    You won't be able to round it without taking out the pattern. You'll need to re-etch it if you want the pattern intact.

    You can go from a file to 120 up to however high you want to take it. I only suggest the file and lower grit to speed up the process. If you try to start with 600 or so it'll be slow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by keithsaltydog View Post
    Not scratching the Damascus.

    59 do you use wet dry paper,this is VG-10 steel,what grit do you start with?
    First off, you're going to scratch the forge-welded cladding. The question is how much and how visible. Usually, you don't need all that much rounding but more of an easing of the edges. If that's the case, I'd go with 400 grit wet-dry or so. The coarser the grit the "messier" the area around the spine is going to look but the work will go faster. So if you care about looks, go finer and slower. If you think it's going too slow, get coarser. If you need to ease around the bolster, try either a dremel or wrap some sandpaper around a pencil or some other appropriately shaped object. Good luck!

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    Thanks I think I will start wt.wet dry 400 & ease the edge,no need a full on rounding.Some higher grit wet dry will also smooth out scratches on the flat of the spine.

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    TK59 makes a good point about the easing -vs- rounding. You'd only need to go very coarse if you round the whole thing out.

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    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    i use sand pads for easing spines. they are soft enough that you can just lay the spine parallel to the pad, push down slightly, and run it back and forth over the sand pad. the knife will sink in enough to easy the spine, and it's pretty consistent. the sharp edge of the spine will disappear much more quickly than the flat spine, itself.

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    Senior Member Jmadams13's Avatar
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    +1 ^ Works every time. Only need to break out the dremal or sandpaper wrapped dowels for actual rounding.
    "This is grain, which any fool can eat, but for which the Lord intended a more divine means of consumption.. Beer!" -Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves, Friar Tuck

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