Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25

Thread: Are all Japanese knives made from harder steel?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    53

    Are all Japanese knives made from harder steel?

    Are all Japanese knives made from harder steel- or just the high-end ones? I'm asking because it is possible, for instance, off Amazon to buy santoku and nakiri for 11-20 dollars or so.

  2. #2
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    4,402
    No telling what they are made of but you get what you pay for...why not stop wasting ten bucks at the time to wind up with basically crap and just shell out <~100 one time?
    once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    53
    I actually think a soft, cheap knife is the way to go- it'll give me more experience sharpening. I just want to get one that has a reasonable edge to start out.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
    Posts
    49
    “The greatest dishes are very simple.” — Auguste Escoffier, the “Emperor of Chefs”

  5. #5
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    4,926
    Quote Originally Posted by FireDragon76 View Post
    I actually think a soft, cheap knife is the way to go- it'll give me more experience sharpening. I just want to get one that has a reasonable edge to start out.
    Actually, it's not. Trying to sharpen a soft, cheap knife will be frustrating and you will learn little from it.

    The Tojiro shirogami series is one of the better choices of an inexpensive knife to learn on: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00G5HBRW2.
    I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.

  6. #6
    Senior Member tjangula's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    'Peg City, MB, Canada
    Posts
    2,071
    Quote Originally Posted by FireDragon76 View Post
    I actually think a soft, cheap knife is the way to go- it'll give me more experience sharpening. I just want to get one that has a reasonable edge to start out.
    Are you referring to sharpening on whetstones or the pull thru sharpener you mentioned in an earlier thread? If budget is a constraint, I'd suggest to get the tojiro DP chefs knife / gyuto, this way you'll have a usable tip for detailed work. Learn to sharpen with your current knives if you're uncomfortable learning on the tojiro.

  7. #7
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central Jersey
    Posts
    3,789
    Quote Originally Posted by FireDragon76 View Post
    I actually think a soft, cheap knife is the way to go- it'll give me more experience sharpening. I just want to get one that has a reasonable edge to start out.
    Nope. A very frustrating experience awaits you if you follow this path.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    53
    I want to get into whetstones. I'm already seeing too many limitations from pull-throughs. I returned one of them I bought because it's just not working out for me.

    I have a small cutting space to work (my cutting board is 12 1/2 x 9). Chef knives are huge- I used one years ago and I was never comfortable with it. I prefer chopping (what is "detailed work"?). Most of my cooking is stir-fry or slow cooker- I'm not a chef, so it's mostly chopping vegetables and slicing a little bit of meat (boneless chicken thighs and pork). I have managed to get my Faberware 5" santoku usably sharp by using an old coffee mug, but I'd like to get real stones to work with, so I'm going to go look at Ace hardware later, and maybe pick up a ceramic sharpening rod or a King 1000 grit stone from Amazon. I'm not sure what will fit my needs. I don't need razor sharp knives but I need them sharp enough that it's safe and not too frustrating.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Toronto, ON
    Posts
    42
    soft steel - more sharpening, i get the logic but cheap AND soft steels are frustrating to get a clean,burrless edge.

  10. #10
    Senior Member tjangula's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    'Peg City, MB, Canada
    Posts
    2,071
    Quote Originally Posted by FireDragon76 View Post
    I want to get into whetstones.

    I have a small cutting space to work (my cutting board is 12 1/2 x 9). Chef knives are huge- I used one years ago and I was never comfortable with it. I prefer chopping (what is "detailed work"?). Most of my cooking is stir-fry or slow cooker- I'm not a chef. I have managed to get my Faberware 5" santoku usably sharp by using an old coffee mug, but I'd like to get real stones to work with, so I'm going to go look at Ace hardware later, and maybe pick up a ceramic sharpening rod or a King 1000 grit stone from Amazon.
    If you think an 8" / 210mm chef knife is too big and prefer to chop, maybe get a decent santoku (~7" / 180mm) rather than a number of cheap knives. The santoku still has somewhat of a usable tip for detail work, although not as usable as a gyuto IMO. By detail work I meant using the tip for precision work; I suggested a gyuto because it may save you from also needing a Parer/Petty for detail work if $ is tight. I wouldn't buy a ceramic rod, a 1000 grit should be adequate (more expensive steels would want to go to a higher grit)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •