210 nimble Gyuto recommendation?

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by marlinspike, Aug 3, 2018.

  1. Aug 3, 2018 #1

    marlinspike

    marlinspike

    marlinspike

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    I think I have it narrowed down to two, but I'm open to suggestions. I am looking to get a 210mm Gyuto that is nimble with a good point for detail work. I generally prefer forward balanced weight. From my own research, I am between the Hinoura Tamashii 210 gyuto (well, the newer hammered version of the same as it is lighter) and the Yahiko Ice 210 gyuto.


    LOCATION
    USA

    KNIFE TYPE
    What type of knife are you interested in: Gyuto

    Are you right or left handed? Right handed

    Are you interested in a Western handle (e.g., classic Wusthof handle) or Japanese handle? Japanese

    What length of knife (blade) are you interested in (in inches or millimeters)? 210mm

    Do you require a stainless knife? (Yes or no) No, but I do like stainless cladding

    What is your absolute maximum budget for your knife? I'll pay more for a better knife, would like to keep it under $400



    KNIFE USE
    Do you primarily intend to use this knife at home or a professional environment? home

    What are the main tasks you primarily intend to use the knife for (e.g., slicing vegetables, chopping vegetables, mincing vegetables, slicing meats, cutting down poultry, breaking poultry bones, filleting fish, trimming meats, etc.)? This knife will be all about detail work.

    What knife, if any, are you replacing? Not replacing anything

    Do you have a particular grip that you primarily use? Pinch

    What cutting motions do you primarily use? I use them all, as appropriate, but this knife will be for slicing and, with the tip, delicate chopping, not concerned with rocking.

    What improvements do you want from your current knife? I care about basically all of the factors basically. Lots of things are case by case (some Damascus I love, some I hate), but I am concered about aesthetics. The deal breakers I would say are I want a rounded spine and I was a nimble knife with a very pointy point. Most important factors beyond that are low wedging and good food release. My one White #2 knife seems to be the ideal edge retention for me (in that it isn't the ultimate in edge retention but it is very very good and takes such a nice edge.

    KNIFE MAINTENANCE
    Do you use a bamboo, wood, rubber, or synthetic cutting board? No

    Do you sharpen your own knives? Yes

    If not, are you interested in learning how to sharpen your knives? Does not apply

    Are you interested in purchasing sharpening products for your knives? Sure? I already have all the stones I need though.
     
  2. Aug 4, 2018 #2

    Mucho Bocho

    Mucho Bocho

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    Gengetsu. Comes in white too.
     
  3. Aug 4, 2018 #3

    Xenif

    Xenif

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    Ginga 210 petty in w#2, lighter and more nimble than majority of gyutos, great tip
     
  4. Aug 4, 2018 #4

    dafox

    dafox

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    My favorite "210mm Gyuto that is nimble with a good point for detail work" is a Masamoto KS 210 (220mm), not currently available, have seen one on BST.
    Next up would be a Ginga 210 gyuto, really 206mm.
     
  5. Aug 4, 2018 #5

    M1k3

    M1k3

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    Ginga line or Takamura.
     
  6. Aug 4, 2018 #6

    dafox

    dafox

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    Ashi Hamano Ginga from Blue Way Japan on Ebay. I did modify the handle on mine, made it thinner, fits my grip better that way.
     
  7. Aug 4, 2018 #7

    sac36555

    sac36555

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    I had to change my comment, because I just realized the Hinoura you were looking at is the lightweight version of the Hinoura’s that are heavyweights. I don’t have any experience with the lighter weight Tamashi, but what I can tell you from handling the Hinoura, the grind is fantastic, flat profile for a slicer, beautiful fit and finish, the Kurouchi finish is definitely a matte finish and will create a little drag on product.

    That being said, when I think of a nimble 210mm with a thin tip for detail work, I think Gesshin Ginga, Takamura R2, Konosuke GS+, Kikuichi Warikomi
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2018
  8. Aug 4, 2018 #8

    Jville

    Jville

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    Shibatas are super nimble, although that might be to laserish for you?
     
  9. Aug 9, 2018 #9

    Viggetorr

    Viggetorr

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    They certainly do have a "pointy point"!
     
  10. Aug 9, 2018 #10

    Alexec

    Alexec

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    I dont know about the rest but Takamura 210 and takamura 150, are more than enough for me especialy on delicate cuts, terines, jells, shaping things. Also can mince shallots and herbs better than any other knife i own.
    Food release isnt the best, wasnt a problem for me at all.

    I dont think and i wouldnt want to use them on heavier tasks, other knives can do the rest
     
  11. Aug 10, 2018 #11

    Theunincrediblehaq

    Theunincrediblehaq

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    Mazaki Kasumi gyuto 210mm. One of my all time favourite gyutos, a nice tall profile, wicked distal taper that makes it feel like a workhorse at the heel to belly and a laser from the top half of the belly to tip. The spine is beautifully rounded, blade has a barely noticeable S-grind for food release and a heat treat of 64-65hrc for W2 steel means edge retention is tip top while it is easy to touch up or sharpen when the knife is dull. I've put this knife through soft produce, hard produce and meat in a pro environment, and I can honestly say, I couldn't have found a better performing knife for its price. Naoki Mazaki is definitely an up and coming blacksmith. With that being said, I'll be collecting as many of his knives before their prices shoot up!
     
  12. Aug 14, 2018 #12

    rebornhj

    rebornhj

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    How is it compare to Shig, Kato, or Toyama?
     
  13. Aug 14, 2018 #13

    parbaked

    parbaked

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    Less expensive!!
     
  14. Aug 14, 2018 #14

    sac36555

    sac36555

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    Totally different knife. The Toyama is a thick blade even at the tip. It’s not meant for delicate work, it’s meant to be a workhorse.
     
  15. Aug 14, 2018 #15

    Jville

    Jville

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    I'm curious if mazaki is one of those makers that makes his 210s much different than his 240s. My 240 is all workhorse. Not as pure of a cutter as toyama, but with better food release.
     
  16. Aug 14, 2018 #16

    marlinspike

    marlinspike

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    Interesting. So at some point I stopped getting notifications of new posts in this thread and didn't realize how many more suggestions came in. At this point, I have the Hinoura on order. The Gesshin Ginga might have been the way I went 1) if I had seen the recommendation in time and 2) if it had some kind of stainless cladding. I already have the Hinoura Nakiri from the same line (the older non-hammered version), so it will be a nice complement.
     
  17. Aug 14, 2018 #17

    MrHiggins

    MrHiggins

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    Maybe he's the kind of maker who's not all that consistent yet.

    My 240 is VERY thin by the time it tapers to the tip. It weighs in at 211gr. at 246mm x 53mm (JNS ho wood D handle). I'd call that somewhere in the middle range of weight for those dimensions.

    (Inconsistent or not, I'm a big fan of mine)
     

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