$3.1 million for a.......... fish

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by Corradobrit1, Jan 5, 2019.

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  1. Jan 5, 2019 #1

    Corradobrit1

    Corradobrit1

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    Record price paid for a tuna. And I thought Kato's and Shig's were overpriced

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-46767370

    What knife would you use to slice and dice that 275kg beauty? Anything less than something epic just wouldn't feel right.
     
  2. Jan 5, 2019 #2

    tongas

    tongas

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    Bit more than 11k$ a kilo, best way to get fit and slim again, sell me 3gr please !
     
  3. Jan 7, 2019 #3

    Barashka

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    I think that was as part of a donation for the new fish market .. a nice move from a well-off guy to support that market. It's a fun place to visit, highly recommend if you get a chance.
     
  4. Jan 7, 2019 #4

    MartinT

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    he was trying to show off his $$$$
     
  5. Jan 7, 2019 #5

    Brandon Wicks

    Brandon Wicks

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    Such a waste of life and money. Blue fin are endangered. We don't even serve any big tunas at my restaurant anymore because of either poor fishing practices, environment damage, or it's just plain old endangered. Plenty of other fish in the sea. I won't eat any red tunas these days unless I know the person who caught it. Albacore and Skipjack are excellent and mighty tasty alternatives I might add.
     
  6. Jan 7, 2019 #6

    JoBone

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    While I love so much about Japan, their fishing habits have a lot to be desired.
     
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  7. Jan 7, 2019 #7

    aaamax

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    Whale is next
     
  8. Jan 7, 2019 #8

    ACHiPo

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    Love skipjack, as well as other jack tunas. Wish they were more common here in the US.
     
  9. Jan 7, 2019 #9

    KenHash

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    "While I love so much about Japan, their fishing habits have a lot to be desired. "

    The Bluefin issue is not simply a "Japanese" one. But the solution, a path to sustainability is.

    "Japan, which consumes nearly 80 percent of the bluefin catch, argued that the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas, or Iccat, should be responsible for regulating the fishery, not the United Nations.
    European Union nations, whose fleets are most responsible for the overfishing of bluefin, abstained from voting in the second round after their own watered-down proposal was rejected."

    https://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/19/science/earth/19species.html?src=sch&pagewanted=all

    The high consumption figure of Bluefin in Japan includes not just domestic consumption but worldwide exports to New York, Los Angeles, London, Moscow, Hong Kong, etc where that global craze for "sushi" has imposed further demand on the species. Another aspect to look at is that Bluefin Tuna Farming to date has involved capturing fish in the wild and rearing them in pens for eventual shipment. This of course only adds to the pressure on wild stocks. To date Kinki University in Japan is the only place where research has resulted in raising Bluefin from the egg, eliminating the need to capture wild stocks.

    In 2016:
    https://money.cnn.com/2016/11/30/technology/kindai-bluefin-tuna-farming/index.html

    In 2018:
    https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Bu...uefin-tuna-ready-for-wider-sales-beyond-Japan

    Complete full cycle farmed Bluefin are now sold in Japan.
     
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  10. Jan 8, 2019 #10

    Brandon Wicks

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    The full cycle farmed bluefin still isn't a good choice. It may be slightly better but still way off the mark. One of my fish monger buddies tried to sell me on it. It takes 25lbs of feed to create 1lb of tuna. So that's thousands of pounds of tasty delicious highly sustainable mackerel,herring, sardines, smelt, etc.. being caught and then fed to the bluefins in the open ocean pens. The waste from those pens just drops down to the sea floor and kills everything creating dead zones. This is the same problem with farmed hamachi, salmon, aji, etc. So just think a 300lbs tuna x 25lbs of feed/lbs = 7500lbs of perfectly good fish that could have just gone to market. This also poses the risk of now overfishing these healthy stocks just essentially mono crop bluefin. People just need to try new things and diversify their diets.

    Oh and on a side note. Tuna is not even really classic traditional sushi. 100 years ago it was considered lowest grade of fish to eat. Small local caught fish, shellfish and mollusks from local bay was what it was all about. Think about it. There wasn't 20 ton fishing boats going out for weeks at time hunting down 500lbs fish. Tuna only gained popularity after WWII with the american soldier populations love for red meat. Then it became everything American/Western was cool so it stuck.

    I could go on an on about this stuff. I literally know the guy who wrote the book on sustainable sushi. If anyone wants to know more about sustainable seafood choices and how to best implement them into you daily life and or restaurants let me know I'll start a separate thread.
     
  11. Jan 8, 2019 #11

    Interapid101

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    I'd definitely be interested in such a thread if you'd be so kind to start one! Thanks for the thoughtful and informative post.
     
  12. Jan 8, 2019 #12

    KenHash

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    Absolutely true that Tuna consume so much feed made up of other species that the sustainability of tuna may come at the expense of those feed species. Japan already imports mackerel from Norway. With the changes we are seeing in ocean temperatures from climactic change the stocks of those feed species are also unpredictable. But as it stands, the price attained by tuna justifies the cost of the feed. A 300 lb bluefin is worth more than 7500 lbs of feed species.
    Of course there is no assurance that the demand for tuna will continue to justify the high price. Already, tuna which has always been the most popular sushi neta in Japan domestically has been replaced with farmed Atlantic salmon.

    Also true that Tuna is not a traditional sushi ingredient. A low class fish commonly eaten by ironworkers, where it got the name Tekka, the now prized Toro was considered cat food. Of course, Salmon was never a traditional ingredient either.

    I second the request to see a thread on this very interesting subject.
     
  13. Jan 8, 2019 #13

    Corradobrit1

    Corradobrit1

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    Wow, power of marketing.
     
  14. Jan 8, 2019 #14

    AT5760

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    Are purchases like this a good luck thing? Or does the money go to a good cause (like 4H auctions at U.S. county fairs)?

    As a complete amateur, I like using tuna because it's easy to prepare, it's very tasty, and fresh tuna tails from my local fishmonger are pretty affordable. Totally open to other, more sustainable options, but for the home cook, local availability drives a lot of my choices.
     
  15. Jan 8, 2019 #15

    KenHash

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    True. Another good example is that in the 1920s/30s Lobster was sold in baitshops in the US Northeast as bait to catch Striped Bass.

    I don't know the answer s to where the money goes. But I do know that the New Years involve many traditions and customs at the family and community level. The first auction of the year is called Hatsu Seri (First Auction) and is a festive/ceremonial tradition at the Tsukiji Fish Market. But this year is the first at the new Toyosu Fish Market, which has replaced Tsukiji. Therefore I think this was a very "special" event. A good price set at the first auction of the year is a good luck thing as you say. At the same time this ayction wonner is Kimura Kiyoshi the owner of the Sushi Zanmai chain and he has set auction records before so I tend to think there's a lot of PR involved as well.
     
  16. Jan 8, 2019 #16

    SacFly

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    Brandon's post above is right on, but it's actually even worse than that. Though they're working on it, they haven't figured out how to raise tuna from eggs on an industrial scale.

    So the way they produce farm raised fish is by finding a school of wild immature tuna, that haven't had a chance to breed yet, netting them all and putting them in feeding pens until they grow to marketable size. This is incredibly shortsighted.

    Many saltwater species are in trouble. Bluefin tuna are in SERIOUS trouble.
     
  17. Jan 9, 2019 #17

    Brandon Wicks

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    Actually they have successfully gotten them to spawn in captivity. It still doesn't make it a good choice. You are correct though that most of bluefin is actually ranched.
    https://thefishsite.com/articles/closed-cycle-bluefin-tuna-new-opportunities-are-born
     
  18. Jan 9, 2019 #18

    Brandon Wicks

    Brandon Wicks

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    Ok it looks like a bunch of you are interested so keep a look out for new thread later this week.
     
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