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A knife knumpty gets his hands on a Kippington

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Luftmensch

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Agreed:

blacksmith > profile > grind > length > whats on tv tonight > steel

... and for me... as a pinch-grip home cook with only ~1hour of knife use a day, i am ambivalent about lengths between 200 and 250. And am even fine with a 180 santoku! (oh the horror đŸ˜¬ )
 

Kippington

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What do you call this grip?
I think the term "hammer grip" tends to get a bad rep, mostly due to people not knowing how to use a hammer. I imagine most people consider it the same as a white knuckle "death grip".
If I had a hammer the same weight as your gyuto, I would probably want to hold it the same way you did in the clip.

Watch a few seconds into each of these videos from guys that know how to use a hammer. I've already skipped to the relevant parts.



 

Luftmensch

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I imagine most people consider it the same as a white knuckle "death grip".
A bit like swinging a mattock. The head is heavy. You dont get too much of a bounce back either. You have to lift the tool all the way back up! And sometimes pull it out of the soil. If you're planning on using it for any length of time on a hot day, it would be a waste of energy (and less controlled) to do much more than let gravity do the work on the way down! Like Uri says - guide it down. White knuckling the handle on impact can send significant, fatiguing shocks back up your wrists and arms. Better to be barely holding onto it or even 'griping' the air around the handle on impact. That way the handle can absorb shock without transferring it back into your body.
 

dafox

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I think the term "hammer grip" tends to get a bad rep, mostly due to people not knowing how to use a hammer. I imagine most people consider it the same as a white knuckle "death grip".
If I had a hammer the same weight as your gyuto, I would probably want to hold it the same way you did in the clip.

Watch a few seconds into each of these videos from guys that know how to use a hammer. I've already skipped to the relevant parts.



Thanks Kippington!
 

budgingllama

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OK, so this has been an extended play with the magic knife (as it was named by my wife, only partially ironically), and @benhendy's generosity has allowed me to learn a couple of things.

1) I still think 240 is too much knife for me. Even a gorgeous, easy-to-hold, beautifully-balanced knife like this one.

2) I don't need a knife this good. It's a mismatch in terms of quality and skill - even a run-of-the-mill Mazaki would be plenty for me đŸ™ƒ I also don't use it enough - we generally eat two meals a day, one of which is a standard breakfast, so it just doesn't get used enough. I've been scrambling for opportunities to make the most of it while I have it.

2a) which is not to say that I don't WANT a knife this good, but realistically, it's wasted on me.

All up, a really fun time with it, and a great learning experience, but I think it's time to send it back before I get too attached to it, 240 or not ;)
Hey man!

If you're interested in a Mazaki im in Sydney and have a great one you're welcome to check out :)
 

OnionSlicer

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To me, pinch grip means the blade is being pinched between the thumb and the index finger, regardless of whether the pinching is around the neck or the engraving. Saltydog is no home cook, and he pinches around the neck in his videos and has said that he considers that to still be pinch grip. When I think of hammer grip, I think of thumb wrapping around the handle.

I like handles that are comfy in both pinch positions. Forward pinch for more control, neck pinch for more blade and for chopping (since the flat spot is commonly at the heel).
 

ma_sha1

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That’s why I called it neck grip earlier, ends the debate between the hammer camp & the pinch clan. It’s a neck grip if anyone is grabbing by the neck.
 

Kippington

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That’s why I called it neck grip earlier, ends the debate between the hammer camp & the pinch clan. It’s a neck grip if anyone is grabbing by the neck.
To me, pinch grip means the blade is being pinched between the thumb and the index finger, regardless of whether the pinching is around the neck or the engraving. Saltydog is no home cook, and he pinches around the neck in his videos and has said that he considers that to still be pinch grip. When I think of hammer grip, I think of thumb wrapping around the handle.

I like handles that are comfy in both pinch positions. Forward pinch for more control, neck pinch for more blade and for chopping (since the flat spot is commonly at the heel).
The problem with this is there are now three different pinch grips - forward, neck and full handle - as well as a hammer grip which is the incorrect way to hold a hammer.
 

cotedupy

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My better half (who has very good knife skills and has worked in kitchens) uses what looks a bit like a 'hammer' grip, but is actually, as mentioned above, pinching but around the ferrule/bolster. It works well for her because she uses almost exclusively rocking cuts. Tho that does blunt stuff a lot more quickly.

A q. perhaps for @Kippington - is there anything different I should be doing when sharpening the knives she uses, compared to how I might normally sharpen...?
 
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