Adding new stones

Discussion in 'Sharpening Station' started by Patrick Gilmartin, Apr 24, 2019.

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  1. Apr 24, 2019 #1

    Patrick Gilmartin

    Patrick Gilmartin

    Patrick Gilmartin

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    Currently I have a shapton pro 1000 and 6000. If I were to add another stone (prob a chosera just for variety, do you think going below 1k, or between, like 3k would be more valuable to my progression?
     
  2. Apr 24, 2019 #2

    Michi

    Michi

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    Unless you have very blunt knives, there is no point in going below 1k. A 3k can be useful for touch-ups, when 1k is too aggressive, and 5k is too slow. But, really, 1k + 5k is sufficient for all but the most blunt of knives.
     
  3. Apr 24, 2019 #3

    Knife2meatu

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    There's no Shapton Pro 6k, as far as I know -- it would be useful to know if you actually have the 5k or the 8k.

    If you have the 8k, you might consider the 5k or 2k to stay within the same Shapton Pro line. The 5k is lacking in feedback, and it does seem to glaze easily; but that's nothing a little dressing cannot fix, and it's priced nicely. The 2k is really nice, however; and worth considering if you're thinking about a 2k.

    If you want a 3k, Chosera 3k is well-liked; only downsides are susceptibility to cracks and price -- If your "6k Shapton Pro" is in fact the 8k, you might also consider the 4k Naniwa Chemical stone; it lacks some of the Choseras' feedback and doesn't seem to form as nice of a slurry, but it is fast and more than makes up for its shortcomings by costing about half what the 3k Cho goes for.
     
  4. Apr 24, 2019 #4

    Patrick Gilmartin

    Patrick Gilmartin

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    Sorry, I meant 5k, one-hand typing while prepping....
     
  5. Apr 24, 2019 #5

    SeattleBen

    SeattleBen

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    Coarse stone or a lapping plate or both. The coarse stone lets you deal with any unforeseen accidents or really dull friends/family knives that you don't want to spend the time on the higher grit stone. You can also use the coarse stone to start the progression but just drastically modulate the pressure downwards. The lapping plate keeps everything in nice working order and also can double as extra coarse stone should you want.

    People really seem to like the Chosera pro 400 and the Shapton pro 320, or the glass 500. Chosera is quite a bit more expensive than the SP lineup but that's a different talk.
     
  6. Apr 24, 2019 #6

    inferno

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    The glass 3k i is very good! I think its the best stone of the glass line, the 500 is killer too. The 4k is nice to finish off high grade SS.

    I'd say it depends on what knives you have. if you are on stainless go with a 3k, if you are on carbons mostly get maybe the 12k pro for fun.

    Stones that every one needs: a diamond plate, a coarse stoneone 2-500 or so, a 1k, a 5-8k and then something in between the high grits and 1k. could be a 2k could be a 4k or even 6k. Depending on what steel you have. The best is obviously to have all of them.

    I've had very good experience with the glass 2,3,4 and 6k and naniwa pro/chosera 2k (these can crack), and also the shapton pro 2k (this is about as refined as soft stainless can handle), recently I got a kitayama 4k and its a very nice good stone too. feels totally different compared to shaptons.

    Good coarse stones are the shapton pro220 and glass 220.
     
  7. Apr 24, 2019 #7

    inferno

    inferno

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    Stone selection also depends on if you are simply sharpening, or flattening sides/thinning/polishing and similar stuff, then you want all the abrasive power you can get in the beginning.
     
  8. Apr 24, 2019 #8

    inferno

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    Also on a sidenote. I have heard from people i trust that the shapton pro 1k is faster than the chosera 400.

    Its not faster than a glass 500 though. The glass is about twice as fast as the pro 1k in my experience. Get the double thick one if getting the 500.
     
  9. Apr 24, 2019 #9

    Marcelo Amaral

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    I would say get a coarser stone. Besides the ones suggested above, there's JNS300 and King 300 Deluxe. They are not fast for their grit, but they dish slow and leave not too deep scratches, good to be followed by a 1k stone. My main use for JNS300 is to set the bevel on stainless (except for aeb-l, in which case i use an aoto natural). Good results setting the bevel on Harner cpm154 steel or sharpening cheap stainless.
     
  10. Apr 24, 2019 #10

    Patrick Gilmartin

    Patrick Gilmartin

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    Fair point. I basically just put edges on. I'm a pro so I have to sharpen a lot, as my knives see significant use daily. I'd like to learn how to polish and so the other stuff, but edges mainly
     
  11. Apr 24, 2019 #11

    Elliot

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    I would recommend something coarser at this point. You have what you need to sharpen knives.
    If you don't have an Atoma for flattening, I would probs go there.

    BUT - if flattening is not a concern, a coarse stone that you can use to thin knives, as well as repair, is prob a safe move. I think the SG500 would be a great call. I think the Chosera 400 is a solid stone and I LOVE the JNS 300, but that's pretty aggressive.
     
  12. Apr 24, 2019 #12

    inferno

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    if you are simply sharpening now its not gonna be long until you have to thin out the knives too. then you want maybe a 220-500 grit for that job imo. i once thinned a knife with a 1k and i'm not doing it ever again i can tell you that.
     
  13. Apr 25, 2019 #13

    slickmamba

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    I'm not sure you need anything between SP 1000/5000. If you want something I'd say chosera 3000, I haven't had any issues with it after 1.5 years and 30ish uses, but others have, but doesn't seem that big of a deal. Its nice to have a lower grit stone for emergencies, but probably not super necessary for now(although many would argue the opposite, get it before you need it). Instead maybe get a nice flattening plate, or some strops?
     
  14. Apr 25, 2019 #14

    Patrick Gilmartin

    Patrick Gilmartin

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    I've got a leather and balsa strop (seem to like the balsa more). I'm gonna ask a question already knowing the answer, but, I have a pink stone flattener but is there am advantage to moving towards a nicer flattening plate?
     
  15. Apr 25, 2019 #15

    Nemo

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    Yes.

    It's faster and it stays flat.
     

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