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Advice on how to rehandle my gesshin stainless gyuto?

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aszma

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Hi all so I bought a handle with the idea that it would be a fun project for me to try and replace the handle on my gesshin stainless. Only problem is I have zero idea on how to tackle this project and from what ive seen on youtube there is more than one way to do so. So if anyone could help me out because I have a list of questions.
1. How should i remove my stock handle without destroying it as Id like to save it for potential future projects.
2. How much $ am i looking at in terms of spending on supplies? I next to UCI and have a much on engineer friends with tools so like the basic tools I already have covered.
3. Should I use epoxy? Beexswax? Heat the tang and shove it in? Not sure what methods best
4. Handle C from this post is the one that I bought. Do different woods have to be installed differently?
https://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/threads/wa-octagonal-handles.44623/
5. On the off chance my drop out brain cant handle this task anyone in the OC or LA area that would be able to help me that I could pay for? Not sure if JKI would do this as i asked questions about it once to josh and he said they only rehandle with handles that they sell. (thats what i think he said i was drunk)

Any other info or tips would be greatly appreciated ty kkf
 

toddnmd

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Just get a long board, 1-2” thick (longer than the blade). Hold the blade against the board and hammer to remove the handle. If the original handle was epoxied, this won’t work, but then you’ll know. In that case, removing the handle might mean destroying it.
Beeswax installation will mean you can remove and/or reinstall. Epoxy is permanent. I don’t think burning in is recommended for stabilized woods. you might need a set of small files ($10-15) if you need to make the tang bigger. Which you won’t know until you remove the handle and do some test fitting.
I installed a couple handles last year, and did in two parts. First part was epoxy to set handle (left the last 1/4” or so without epoxy so I could finish later), second step was sealing handle with epoxy or beeswax.
If the original glue/epoxy is too hard, I have seen people put the whole knife into a low oven to soften it before using the board and hammer.
Good luck, please update with how it goes!
 

RDalman

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Melt glue is common also, so heating it up low, like 80-90c will soften that if so. It's also my favourite way of installing handles. Cut melt glue pellets, put into handle slot, heatup tang tip and insert melting the glue on the way.
 

Matus

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Melt glue is common also, so heating it up low, like 80-90c will soften that if so. It's also my favourite way of installing handles. Cut melt glue pellets, put into handle slot, heatup tang tip and insert melting the glue on the way.
I guess that this could allow me to go away from epoxy (slow and messy process) on hidden tang handles. Must give it a try
 

Bensbites

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Todd and RDalman summed it up well. Once you choose a method, epoxy, beeswax, or melt glue, I will be happy to share my experience.
 

aszma

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Just get a long board, 1-2” thick (longer than the blade). Hold the blade against the board and hammer to remove the handle. If the original handle was epoxied, this won’t work, but then you’ll know. In that case, removing the handle might mean destroying it.
Beeswax installation will mean you can remove and/or reinstall. Epoxy is permanent. I don’t think burning in is recommended for stabilized woods. you might need a set of small files ($10-15) if you need to make the tang bigger. Which you won’t know until you remove the handle and do some test fitting.
I installed a couple handles last year, and did in two parts. First part was epoxy to set handle (left the last 1/4” or so without epoxy so I could finish later), second step was sealing handle with epoxy or beeswax.
If the original glue/epoxy is too hard, I have seen people put the whole knife into a low oven to soften it before using the board and hammer.
Good luck, please update with how it goes!
Thank you for all the information my handle comes in on thursday and ill be doing it this weekend ill post pictures when i finish and if this project works itll give me the go ahead to start doing other similar projects.
 

aszma

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Todd and RDalman summed it up well. Once you choose a method, epoxy, beeswax, or melt glue, I will be happy to share my experience.
Id love to hear them im probably going to try and epoxy it in
 

Bensbites

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Id love to hear them im probably going to try and epoxy it in
1) prep everything. Dry fit the knife making sure it sits straight. Wear gloves. Cover your work area with foil.
2)cover exposed surfaces with painters tape or board butter. I prefer board butter on wood and painters tape on steel. This will protect against ozze. Make sure the painters tape is snug on the blade to you can see the choil alignment and hold it straight while waiting for the epoxy to cure.
3) I like to mix 5 minute /2 part epoxy and add it to a 10 ml syringe. You can get syringes at your local pharmacy for orally dosing toddlers with meds.
4) add the epoxy down the tang hole. It will be thick like honey. If your tang hole is thin, consider beeswax.
5) insert blade and hold it steady. Wipe away excess epoxy with paper towels. Have 1-2 ready.
6) while the epoxy is curing check constantly for alignment. Choil, spine and side view.
7) fill any voids with thin super glue.
 

NO ChoP!

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If it's currently set in quick set epoxy it will be brittle, and should crack free with a few wacks of the aforementioned technique. If it's a longer set, you will need to boil the handle first. After boiling, if you want to save the handle, it will need a long bath in oil.
Often basic ho wood handles are set with just a dab of epoxy or even a puddy like substance that breaks free rather easily. Even more often, they are simply burnt in and the tang hole is sealed with some form of sealant.
The handle you purchased appears to have a rather large slot. I dont think fitting the tang will be much of a problem, but getting it to set straight will take some patients.
 

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