Advice sought on rehabbing damascus

Discussion in 'Sharpening Station' started by stringer, Feb 10, 2019.

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  1. Feb 10, 2019 #1

    stringer

    stringer

    stringer

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    This is my wife's 180 mm Gyuto. She bought it on a whim from Japanese Knife Company about 7 or 8 years ago. It's Damascus stainless clad vg10. It gets used every day for home cooking. It has been sharpened regularly and thinned a little every sharpening session. The Damascus pattern is faded and uneven due to thinning. I would like to make it pop again. I understand the first step will be sanding through a progression to even it out. And then some kind of etching process. What works best for stainless Damascus pattern weld cladding? What can I do safely in my apartment?
    Here's some pics of what we're dealing with. Thanks in advance for any tips or pointers.


    IMG_20190209_172222.jpg

    IMG_20190209_172409.jpg

    IMG_20190209_172422.jpg
     
  2. Feb 10, 2019 #2

    vicv

    vicv

    vicv

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    As you said I would use sandpaper to get an even finish. Ferric chloride is what to use to etch it. It's water soluble and safe. Rince with Windex (contains ammonia which is an alkaline and neutralizes the acid). Try 30 seconds first and see how it looks. Then go progressively longer until you reach your desired finish
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
  3. Feb 11, 2019 #3

    stringer

    stringer

    stringer

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    Thanks. I'll give it a shot when I get a chance.
     
  4. Feb 11, 2019 #4

    vicv

    vicv

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    No problem. It can be worrisome to use the acid wondering if you'll ruin the finish. The such isn't very deep and is easily sanded out of you don't like the results
     
    Knife2meatu likes this.
  5. Feb 11, 2019 #5

    galvaude

    galvaude

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    On the sandpaper part, use a tight progression and soft backing.
     
  6. Feb 11, 2019 #6

    vicv

    vicv

    vicv

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    Also don't be afraid to drop to a lower grit if it's taking too long at the start. Alternate direction when changing grits. Eg. 240 grit go spine to edge. When going to 320 grit go heel to tip. Back and forth. I find it helps to use wet and dry and use it wet. By the time you get to 800 you'll have a very nice finish
     

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