Am now using my #400 Grit Water Stone on hard stainless steel blades.

Discussion in 'Sharpening Station' started by Ivan Hersh, Dec 10, 2019.

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  1. Dec 10, 2019 #1

    Ivan Hersh

    Ivan Hersh

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    I have found that it's quicker and does a very good job of sharping my hard stainless steel blades, i had been using other higher grit water stones and had been spending to much time and really not getting the sharpness i wanted.
     
  2. Dec 10, 2019 #2

    Benuser

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    Don't be afraid of coarse stones! If you know what you're doing they are very helpful. Staying too long with a stone is likely to induce errors.
     
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  3. Dec 10, 2019 #3

    Ivan Hersh

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    I agree with you different steels require trying many stone grits.
     
  4. Dec 12, 2019 #4

    Kitchen-Samurai

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    Yup, I like my coarser stones as well. Yesterday I worked on my Takeda NAS, started with a Gesshin 400, but ended up going coarser to a Shapton Glass 220. Sometimes, that's just needed.
     
  5. Dec 12, 2019 #5

    SeattleBen

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    Especially for hard or beat up steels starting low really saves time and stone wear on the higher grit expensive stones.
     
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  6. Dec 12, 2019 #6

    M1k3

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    I usually start on my SG500 for everything, for the bite. From there it depends on what it is. Co-workers Kiwi stops there. Wusthof SP2k. My Takamura gets a few passes on SG4k. Ikazuchi SP2k> SG4k. Paring knife SP2k-> SG4k-> King 6k-> 1 micron diamond strop.
     
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  7. Dec 13, 2019 #7

    bahamaroot

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    When it comes time to sharpen, and not just touch up, I use low grit stones on everything.
     
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  8. Dec 13, 2019 #8

    dafox

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    Doesn't that prematurely shorten a knife's life? I usually start with a 1000ish grit, starting with a 500ish grit seems to aggressive.
     
  9. Dec 13, 2019 #9

    bahamaroot

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    No, it just gets you to an apex faster and speeds up the process. It takes x amount of steel removed to get an apex regardless of the grit of stone used.
     
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  10. Dec 13, 2019 #10

    nakneker

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    I just like your pic..... that is all.
     
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  11. Dec 13, 2019 #11

    bahamaroot

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    [​IMG]
    7.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2019
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  12. Dec 13, 2019 #12

    Xenif

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  13. Dec 13, 2019 #13

    kayman67

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    It might be or not. There's no definitive answer to this. You can see if it is or not by doing both.
    There are other things to consider so ymmv by a good margin on different levels.
    Usually, most knives, once done right as step one, require less maintenance up to a point when you need to do a bit more work on them. You pretty much learn to know when it's time.
     
  14. Dec 13, 2019 #14

    Ivan Hersh

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    And i find there are parts of the blade that you really never use, so it's a waste of time to sharpen the full length of the blade.
    This might not be true for all cutting chores, so it's up each person to know what part of their blade needs to always be really sharp.
     
  15. Dec 13, 2019 #15

    bahamaroot

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    I disagree. I think it's important to always sharpen the entire edge if you intend to maintain the profile.
     
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  16. Dec 13, 2019 #16

    M1k3

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  17. Dec 14, 2019 #17

    Benuser

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    I can imagine a tip repair without a full sharpening. Otherwise, it leads to a reverse belly with a protruding heel as we know from steeling abuse. Or a flattened upswing. At least, it explains the very curious profiles one sees from time to time.
     

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