And Then I Thought I've Seen Chefs Do The Worse Thing...

Discussion in 'Sharpening Station' started by ModRQC, Dec 4, 2019.

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  1. Dec 4, 2019 #1

    ModRQC

    ModRQC

    ModRQC

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    I had a bad dream... it went just like this...

    https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/videos/techniques/knife-skills

    I know it's old... I know you've probably seen it... but GoodFood still holds this current for noobs teaching.

    45 degrees... 45 degrees??! Even outdated, and even talking about the crappiest western blade... I think this guy totally missed the "including" angle notion. But... but... has he ever looked at a knife at all? A 90 degree blade probably existed in the first ever recorded forge before becoming the very first fire poker to be shared for mankind to enjoy.

    This is truly terrible and should be removed promptly. Not that I care but it is kind of fun to watch... I wouldn't mind for the beater he is beating on this rod at a 45 degree angle. But think how many many blades turned into stampers following this cap...
     
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  2. Dec 4, 2019 #2

    Benuser

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    Wasn't it Chad Ward who wrote about 'impressing tourists'?
     
  3. Dec 4, 2019 #3

    kayman67

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    It's a bit more complicated, but what he actually says there is the way for many many chefs and I imagine is what they have learned and still do as youngsters follow the same path. The idea itself that proper cutting means only rocking/slicing gave me a lot of grief over the years and I had a lot of trouble when I said something else. Same goes for that "sharpening". So, what you see there is pretty much the norm I have encountered many many times. I've asked myself why is this cutting method so well defended and they do hold some truth as the knives they use and the way they are sharpened, only work like this. This method negates lots of geometry problems and very thick edges and behinds (pardon my French here).
     
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  4. Dec 4, 2019 #4

    Benuser

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    The geometry problems will only get worse after the thickening who is to be expected. The answer younger generations get, is to hold the handle with an iron grip. Good luck after thirty years.
     
  5. Dec 4, 2019 #5

    Oui Chef

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    Probably not painful for all people to watch but definitely is as a chef o_O
     
  6. Dec 4, 2019 #6

    GeneH

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    Ugh. At about :50 he mentions you can do it, "...like a professional." I've educated my kids ages ago that a "professional" is someone who gets paid, not someone that is good at what they do. Amatures can be better than the self-proclaimed professions. Now, acting professional is legit. It's a behavior, not a tangible skill.

    Now before you break me off at the hilt - I have the utmost respect for all the professional here - busting your butts in a professional kitchen. I'm not discounting hard working skilled folks - I'm miffed at the use of "professional" by knuckleheads who get paid and screw things up because they don't know their craft.
     
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  7. Dec 4, 2019 #7

    kayman67

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    Oh, and this, "only professionals need good knives". I've heard it countless times.
     
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  8. Dec 4, 2019 #8

    kayman67

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    I'll do a new test if time allows me. It's quite interesting just by how much this technique can make a terrible knife, somewhat usable compared to being almost impossible to have a carrot chopped with it.
     
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  9. Dec 4, 2019 #9

    nutmeg

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    I've been in kitchens for about 10 years. Many restaurants, several 1- and 2- Michelin stars restaurants with some well known chefs.. I saw maybe 10 people who got an "ok" sharp knife with a steel. Only two people where I always used to think: Ok, it seems you won't never need to sharpen it (or let it sharpen) on a "real" set up.
    People use mostly the steel in order to externalize their feelings or aggressivity . In a pro kitchen you have to be tough and show it most of the time. At home you must be the coolest.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2019
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  10. Dec 4, 2019 #10

    nutmeg

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    Only professionals don't need good knives IMO :p
     
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  11. Dec 4, 2019 #11

    Garm

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    Someone has clearly, and I've seen this other places too, read the classic advice of holding your knife at about 45 degrees relative to the stone(angle of approach), and understood it as raising the spine 45 degrees from the stone.
    I remember an American lady with some extremely entertaining YT videos on knife technique and sharpening sharing the same exact advice.
     
  12. Dec 5, 2019 #12

    bahamaroot

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  13. Dec 5, 2019 #13

    M1k3

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    :eek::eek::eek:

















    :waiting::waiting::waiting::waiting:
     
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  14. Dec 5, 2019 #14

    Michi

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    I vividly remember that one. Yet another example of the Dunning-Kruger effect…
     
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  15. Dec 5, 2019 #15

    Briochy

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    I like how a lot of 'professional' western chefs just casually take a dump on the whole of Japan and most asian countries where we push cut or chop straight down rather than rock chopping. It's not "misconception", it's just you being ignorant lol.
     
  16. Dec 5, 2019 #16

    Garm

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    Yes, this is the exact one I was thinking of. Fantastic!
     
  17. Dec 5, 2019 #17

    kayman67

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    I would say go higher. 45 is such a low number. Why settle for less? 160 sounds about right. Let's make a trend. Let's sharpen our knives at 160°! I'm definitely doing this. From now on, I'll be using angles like this. How the heck is this the first time I am considering it?
     
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  18. Dec 5, 2019 #18

    spyne

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    Oh dear lord. I'm VERY much an amateur, but damn did she just "refine" her "sharpened" edge with a steel at near perpendicular!?!?!
    Not to mention sharpening the blade TOWARDS her free hand!!
     
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  19. Dec 5, 2019 #19

    GeneH

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    That's what I thought also - looked like perpendicular to me.
     

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