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Anti Fatigue Mats

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slowtyper

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Looking to get an anti-fatigue mat to make it easier to stand all day.

I saw some before at costco and at bed bath and beyond, however they seem a bit flimsy compared to the heavy duty ones I've seen around. For example at Costco the person who stands at the front checking for memberships has a nice thick rubber mat. I tried it out and asked where they get it, but they have no clue.

I see a bunch on ebay...but I am looking for recommendations from anyone who uses them in a professional environment.

Thanks
 

SpikeC

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Ok, first off, my appologies for not using these professionally, but if you want the ultimate look to an equine supply place, like a tack shop, for stall mats. They are really thick and virtually indestructible. Ones for horse trailers will work as well.
 

mr drinky

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I bought a cheap anti-fatigue mat recently to try out in front of my sharpening station. I think it was Martha Stewart at Home Depot. I don't expect it to last that long, but I just wanted to try it out before investing in something better. With that said, I would also recommend investing in orthotics for your shoes. the make standing, running, and walking much less fatiguing and will also prevent foot problems later in life.

k.
 

tk59

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I've been wondering about these mats. As for orthotics, etc., I've recently embraced minimalist footwear after poo-pooing it for a long time. I have tried all kinds of orthotics and fancy shoes. The way I think about it now is an arm in a cast atrophies away. The more our footwear is like a cast, the weaker and more prone injury our feet become. It definitely seems to be working for me over the last 6 mo or so.
 

kalaeb

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I was using mighty mats from Shoes for Crews for years. They were decent, but not great. Now I go through my linnen disrtibutor and they take them and clean them every week. You can usually get varying thickness and each mat only costs a few dollars a week.
 

steeley

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Gel Pro mats for home and anti fugitive mats for work.
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steeley

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oh man . well that why they don't do back ground checks on cooks.
there motto is no crime on the mat
 

Michael Rader

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I find the horse-stall mats to be a little too hard for standing in one place for hours at a time (I have a few in my shop.) I like the foam, puzzle-piece mats you can get from Costco, Lowes/Home Depot quite well. A little spray adhesive on the ground keeps them in place and they feel nicer than the horse-stall mats. If you can find the big thick ones the checkers use at costco, that would be great, but I've seen some like that at Loews and they are pricy.
-M
 

SpikeC

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The horse mats are pretty heavy duty, wonder why?
 

cnochef

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+1 on using orthotics, should have done so years ago, but now that I have good health benefits I get new ones every year. However, I also find that my Birkenstock Boston clogs are just as good as orthotics, they're not exactly heavy duty though.

As for mats, gel mats are OK, but these are heavier duty and the edges are guaranteed not to curl up: www.wellnessmats.com
 

NO ChoP!

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For a pro kitchen you have to use the grease resistant variety. They are usually orange. The regulation black style, no matter how heavy duty, will not stand up to the constant exposure to the bottom of a cooks shoe; ie: food/ grease. They will disintegrate quickly.

On a second note, although maybe better for your feet/ knees, most cooks dislike mats. They get filthy, you cannot regularly run a broom during service; having to wait to the end of the night to pull them. And, you have to run them through the dishmachine daily, which is a wet, filthy experience and leaves the machine filthy.
 

ecchef

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For a pro kitchen you have to use the grease resistant variety. They are usually orange. The regulation black style, no matter how heavy duty, will not stand up to the constant exposure to the bottom of a cooks shoe; ie: food/ grease. They will disintegrate quickly.

On a second note, although maybe better for your feet/ knees, most cooks dislike mats. They get filthy, you cannot regularly run a broom during service; having to wait to the end of the night to pull them. And, you have to run them through the dishmachine daily, which is a wet, filthy experience and leaves the machine filthy.
All true. I hate mats with a passion. :angry1:
 

Eamon Burke

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I find the horse-stall mats to be a little too hard for standing in one place for hours at a time (I have a few in my shop.) I like the foam, puzzle-piece mats you can get from Costco, Lowes/Home Depot quite well. A little spray adhesive on the ground keeps them in place and they feel nicer than the horse-stall mats. If you can find the big thick ones the checkers use at costco, that would be great, but I've seen some like that at Loews and they are pricy.
-M
So, do you use your floormats to clean your belts now?
 

Vertigo

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For a pro kitchen you have to use the grease resistant variety. They are usually orange. The regulation black style, no matter how heavy duty, will not stand up to the constant exposure to the bottom of a cooks shoe; ie: food/ grease. They will disintegrate quickly.

On a second note, although maybe better for your feet/ knees, most cooks dislike mats. They get filthy, you cannot regularly run a broom during service; having to wait to the end of the night to pull them. And, you have to run them through the dishmachine daily, which is a wet, filthy experience and leaves the machine filthy.
+1 I hate the damn mats. Of course, I'd rather stand on something comfortable like a mat than just the tile, but still. I hate the damn things.
 

aaronsgibson

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Yup I hear you there. When I prep at work there aren't any mats around and tile is hard on the feet. When it comes to cleaning like some have said. Can't really clean'em that fast and at the end you have to spry then down and toss them through the dish machine. (Then empty the water).
 

cnochef

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I don't hate the mats like most of you line studs, because I work in a smaller private kitchen cooking healthier food (we don't even have a deep fryer).

After 25 years in the biz, my tired old dogs appreciate the creature comforts.
 

JanusInTheGarden

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Nope, can't stand them. They totally gross me out and I see them as a tripping hazard. I stay up better when I'm being a little more cautious with my footing on the tile. Plus, as No Chop mentioned, it makes a ten second sweep into a PIA.

But TK59, what is this minimalist footwear you mentioned? Does it still have treaded grips? I'm looking at upgrading from the flimsy, B.S. treaded crocs (F.U. Batali), and I'm shopping around.
 

mr drinky

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But TK59, what is this minimalist footwear you mentioned? Does it still have treaded grips? I'm looking at upgrading from the flimsy, B.S. treaded crocs (F.U. Batali), and I'm shopping around.
I was wondering that too. I must admit that orthotics were a foot-life saver for me. I was given the choice of doing nothing and being partially disabled, having surgery, taking drugs, or orthotics. I chose the orthotics as the best option and it worked for 8 years. Only recently have I started having foot problems again, but that was because my orthotics 'went flat' and I re-inflamed my foot nerves. Now I have new orthotics and have to take steroids for a bit, but I am back to running daily.

Also, taking fatigue in another direction, I do pilates daily for back health (I've broken my back twice). It used to be I couldn't stand up for more than 20-30 seconds without major pain, but now my back is healthier than when I was in my 20s. Strengthening those core muscles will perform wonders -- I promise. A Canadian paratrooper with back trauma introduced me to pilates. He went from being bedridden/disabled to active again in 6 months.

Don't forget about the body in fighting fatigue. There's my plug for better back health.

k.
 

tophermarshall

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I don't hate the mats like most of you line studs, because I work in a smaller private kitchen cooking healthier food (we don't even have a deep fryer).

After 25 years in the biz, my tired old dogs appreciate the creature comforts.

I have to agree, Wellnessmats are great. They even make industrial ones. I have two in my garage for my workbench.
 

Lucretia

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Haven't used one, but Grainger lists 500 antifatigue mats. They're geared toward an industrial environment, but it's a place to look, anyway. Haven't bought anything from Grainger for years and it seems like they used to be a little high priced, but they have all sorts of hard to find stuff.

edit: we used to have some great mats in the machine shop at work, but not sure where they came from. A lot of stuff did come from Grainger, tho.
 

imagemats

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gel mats are good options if you want to install anti-fatigue mats. It is effective for supporting the soles and the ankles and makes your feet and lower legs more relaxed!
 

Salty dog

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I don't like mats either. I swear by Merril's on my feet.
 
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