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Any Experience With Sakai Takayuki Kasumitogi Knives

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knspiracy

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Hi I'd like to buy my first single bevel work horse. I prep a ton of veges.

I currently have 2 single bevels - a takobiki slicer and a 165 mm deba but I only fillet and slice sporadically. The rest are western knives.
Does anyone have experience with this knife... or at least this range of knives. They are white#3 FWIW. How's the value, F&F etc?


Sakai Takayuki Kasumitogi Vegetable Knife

s-l1600.jpg


Otherwise Im starting to look at this:
Fu-Rin-Ka-Zan Hon Kasumi Series Blue Steel No.2 Wa Petty

fu-rin-ka-zan-wa-petty-fu-rin-ka-zan-hon-kasumi-series-blue-steel-no-2-wa-petty-2-sizes-wa-pet...jpg


I'm intrigued by the wavy pattern on the back (If I could also be pointed to a thread that discusses this - I believe its "crest-forging"???)

They both seem vege friendly ...

Yhoughs and other ideas...?
 

Nemo

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I'm curious- why do you want a single bevel knife for veggies? They are fun to try but they steer ferociously and wedge a lot. This characteristic is exaggurated in veggies because of the height and density of many veggies. They are great for traditional Japanese cutting techniques such as katsuramuki but not so great for western style veggie prep.

If you just want a blooddy sharp veggie knife with either good food release or extreme thinness, there are plenty of great carbon steel nakiris or short gyutos to choose from. Maybe fill out the questionairre if this is what you are after.

I can't comment on either of these particular knives although I do have a ST Tokojou usuba, which is a more expensive line than the ST that you linked. It appears to have an even grind, although I won't know for sure until it gets its first hamiguriba sharpening (which it is waiting for now). The main issue with cheaper single bevels is that there is grrater risk of the grind being uneven, with lots of low spots, an uneven shonogi and even overgrinds. Once again, I have no idea whether this applies to either of the knives that you have linked. If they do have uneven grinds, they can be pretty challenging to fix.
 
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Unstoppabo

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+1 to @Nemo's comment. I picked up a SB petty to play around with during lockdown and although I am having fun learning new cutting techniques, uses are pretty limited and I've got a long way to go before I would consider using a SB for even moderate volume of veggie prep.

The flat mukimono profile will work better for veggies and I'm very tempted to pick up that FRKZ now that it's restocked. If you care about F&F, the FRKZ is probably a safer bet if you don't mind spending a bit more.
 

Staystrapped

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I'm curious- why do you want a single bevel knife for veggies? They are fun to try but they steer ferociously and wedge a lot. This characteristic is exaggurated in veggies because of the height and density of many veggies. They are great for traditional Japanese cutting techniques such as katsuramuki but not so great for western style veggie prep.

If you just want a blooddy sharp veggie knife with either good food release or extreme thinness, there are plenty of great carbon steel nakiris or short gyutos to choose from. Maybe fill out the questionairre if this is what you are after.

I can't comment on either of these particular knives although I do have a ST Tokojou usuba, which is a more expensive line than the ST that you linked. It appears to have an even grind, although I won't know for sure until it gets its first hamiguriba sharpening (which it is waiting for now). The main issue with cheaper single bevels is that there is grrater risk of the grind being uneven, with lots of low spots, an uneven shonogi and even overgrinds. Once again, I have no idea whether this applies to either of the knives that you have linked. If they do have uneven grinds, they can be pretty challenging to fix.
I suppose this is why the kireba on my 68$ yanagi has a few low spots lol
 

knspiracy

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I'm curious- why do you want a single bevel knife for veggies? They are fun to try but they steer ferociously and wedge a lot. This characteristic is exaggurated in veggies because of the height and density of many veggies. They are great for traditional Japanese cutting techniques such as katsuramuki but not so great for western style veggie prep.

If you just want a blooddy sharp veggie knife with either good food release or extreme thinness, there are plenty of great carbon steel nakiris or short gyutos to choose from. Maybe fill out the questionairre if this is what you are after.

I can't comment on either of these particular knives although I do have a ST Tokojou usuba, which is a more expensive line than the ST that you linked. It appears to have an even grind, although I won't know for sure until it gets its first hamiguriba sharpening (which it is waiting for now). The main issue with cheaper single bevels is that there is grrater risk of the grind being uneven, with lots of low spots, an uneven shonogi and even overgrinds. Once again, I have no idea whether this applies to either of the knives that you have linked. If they do have uneven grinds, they can be pretty challenging to fix.
I want to become more accustomed to the use of single bevel knives. These particular knives have thin profiles so wedging would not be an issue. And with the "steering" I would accommodate with controlled technique and pressure. I don't prep like a madman. I have time in my day to slow down and focus my energy on knife handling.
For larger items I would still use my wa-gyuto, but for all my shallots, zucchini, brocolli, cauliflower, button mushrooms, mincing, dicing, peeling fruits, I'd like a smaller knife with a pointy end that would cover a lot of tasks.
Plus I want to level up my knife handling with single bevel work.
 

Qapla'

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From what I read, most users consider the Takayuki Kasumi to be a worthy low-cost choice for single-bevel knives. I can't tell you from first-hand experience, though.

I will also note that the Takayuki Kasumi comes in two sub-lines; one with the "cheapie" handles with the plastic bolster, and one with the "serious" handle with the buffalo-horn bolster. Also, if you buy it from the vendor you linked to, you will be on your own for a scabbard.

Also, are you righty? If not, that'll change both your choices and your price point.
 
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Nemo

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I want to become more accustomed to the use of single bevel knives. These particular knives have thin profiles so wedging would not be an issue. And with the "steering" I would accommodate with controlled technique and pressure. I don't prep like a madman. I have time in my day to slow down and focus my energy on knife handling.
For larger items I would still use my wa-gyuto, but for all my shallots, zucchini, brocolli, cauliflower, button mushrooms, mincing, dicing, peeling fruits, I'd like a smaller knife with a pointy end that would cover a lot of tasks.
Plus I want to level up my knife handling with single bevel work.
This is indeed a legit reason to buy a single bevel. Heck, it's why I bought mine. As long as you go in with your eyes open re the downsides. And the potential problems with budget single bevels.

Qualpa's point about handedness is important. Don't get a rightie single bevel if you aremamlefty.
 

knspiracy

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This is indeed a legit reason to buy a single bevel. Heck, it's why I bought mine. As long as you go in with your eyes open re the downsides. And the potential problems with budget single bevels.

Qualpa's point about handedness is important. Don't get a rightie single bevel if you aremamlefty.
Apart from slicing fish. Are single bevel knives ok being chopped into a cutting board. Obviously not recklessly...
Or are they for hand held work, filleting, sashimi slicing and butchery only?
 

Qapla'

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Apart from slicing fish. Are single bevel knives ok being chopped into a cutting board. Obviously not recklessly...
Or are they for hand held work, filleting, sashimi slicing and butchery only?
The answer is yes. The toughness of deba's is well-known enough given their thickness. And usuba's are used all the time to chop up the vegetable-paper produced via katsuramuki.

Regarding on-board mukimono use, another poster posted up links to footage of on-board mukimono use via his instagram feed.
 

M1k3

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I'm still waiting for the day this forum rediscovers santokus. Right now people seem to be allergic ("short gyuto" 🙄) but I think there's hype potential for next year
Me too! Wish everyone would stop buying Gyuto's and buy a nice Santoku.
 

Nemo

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I'm still waiting for the day this forum rediscovers santokus. Right now people seem to be allergic ("short gyuto" 🙄) but I think there's hype potential for next year
Hype away. I'll still be ploughing through buckets of produce with my 270mm gyutos 😇
 
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