anyone making bird's beak pairing knives?

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by jessf, Jan 10, 2016.

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  1. Jan 10, 2016 #1

    jessf

    jessf

    jessf

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    Apologize if this is in the wrong section, but is anyone making birds beak pairing knives, perhaps pattern welded? Id like just the steel, i can make the handle.
     
  2. Jan 10, 2016 #2

    WildBoar

    WildBoar

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    I believe both Delbert Ealy and Butch Harner have made them before, but expect a wait as they are not produced regularly. Both will occassionally produce a batch of parers in different sizes and shapes. Marko may be making some as well. Of the three, Del forges his own damascus.

    Randy at HHH has made some damascus parers as well.
     
  3. Jan 10, 2016 #3

    jessf

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    Delbert's knives brought me here. Ill contact him directly. Thanks
     
  4. Jan 11, 2016 #4
    Del, Burch and Randy would be my starting points. I've parers from all three and sometimes it's hard to pick just one to use.
     
  5. Jan 11, 2016 #5

    Zwiefel

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    Aren't those a PITA to maintain the edge? Is there enough utility to justify the additional effort?
     
  6. Jan 11, 2016 #6

    jessf

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    Im just accustomed to the shape and use. How much edge attention does a blade need if itnever touches a cutting board?


     
  7. Jan 11, 2016 #7

    MAS4T0

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    This is what you need!
     
  8. Jan 11, 2016 #8

    Zwiefel

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    I was thinking more about what/how you'd use to put a new edge on, or even strop.
     
  9. Jan 11, 2016 #9

    richard

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    Fine ceramic honing rod can work
     
  10. Jan 11, 2016 #10

    jessf

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    I have a tapered sharpening stone I use on my gouges, it should do the trick. Stropping can be done by applying honing compound to a piece of pine with the same curve.



     
  11. Jan 11, 2016 #11

    jessf

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    The middle one would be nice! Are they for sale? Any specs on the HRC?

     
  12. Jan 11, 2016 #12

    MAS4T0

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    No, I very much doubt it. That was dug up from another thread just to show what's possible.
    They're by Michael Rader and I've no idea how much they'd have cost or how many years the wait would be.
     
  13. Jan 11, 2016 #13

    Zwiefel

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    to refine an existing edge, sure.

    Fair enough. But...is there some specific capability of a birds beak that makes it a good trade for having this more specialized sharpening kit? Of course, nobody here is truly basing their choices on a pure ROI...this is a hobby for us. :) My question is honest though: other than novelty, what is it that the bird's beak does so much better that makes this is a good trade off?
     
  14. Jan 11, 2016 #14

    WildBoar

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    Pretty sure the shape helps it keep more edge contact with rounded items, which shortens the time needed for removing peels. May not be a big deal for a home cook but can probably result in a pro cutting a bit of time off a tedious prep item. There have been a couple of vids posted over the years of some in use.
     
  15. Jan 11, 2016 #15

    chinacats

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    It's for tourning, correct? I've considered one myself for that purpose.
     
  16. Jan 11, 2016 #16

    ThEoRy

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    I use my birds beak like once every three years. It's really good at opening vac bags however.
     
  17. Jan 11, 2016 #17

    richard

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    The classic use in French cooking is for tourning, yes.
     
  18. Jan 12, 2016 #18

    jessf

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    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=_IWty8bKFnw

    Reminds me of bugs bunny turning a tree trunk into a single tooth pick. I don't use a BB paring knife for this, but the hook shape does make prep a little easier on my hands for me.
     
  19. Jan 12, 2016 #19

    Zwiefel

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    ChinaCats/Theory/Richard/jessf: OK, that's what I was trying to understand. Thanks!
     
  20. Jan 12, 2016 #20

    ramenlegend

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    I use a birds beak every day for butchery. Frenching racks, taking out wish bones, cutting string while tying roasts etc. I would dig a custom birds beak.
     
  21. Jan 12, 2016 #21

    jessf

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    In my hay day, I frenched many a rack...of lamb. You scrape the bone or clean with a BB, or with butchers twine? Twine method cleans the bone like no one's business.

     
  22. Jan 12, 2016 #22

    spoiledbroth

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    not a cloth? thats what I do for frenching, nice dry clean cloth. frenching a common thing to do up here in canada which is why I find it hard to part with the dessoser boning knife for a honesuki or other japanaese boning knife. I'm pretty sure that little swoop at the bottom of french boning knives is made specifically to scrape.
     
  23. Jan 12, 2016 #23

    Benuser

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    I'm familiar with bird's beak peelers by Robert Herder, Solingen.
     

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