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Asimetric grinds

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dbesed

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I know it's been covered 100x times, but is the nomenclature in the picture correct ? The left and right refers to the sides of a knife that is hold in the right hand.

Which is the most common grind for a japanese gyuto?
 

mainaman

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they are mostly symmetric with some kind of asymmetric bevels.
I know Aritsugu is asymmetric grind, not sure of others.
 

El Pescador

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The more asymetric the more a knife will steer or dive.
 

tk59

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Most of my favorites look most like the one on the right, other than all of the flatness. :)
 

Marko Tsourkan

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Most of my favorites look most like the one on the right, other than all of the flatness. :)
Mine too, but I would replace microbevel on the left side with a convex and blend the bevel on the right into a convex, thought tk59 would probably leave it as is.

M
 

dbesed

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Ok thanks for the responses. I have another question. Would i have any advantages in doing a assymetric bevel on my tojiro dp or does the assymetric bevel help only on a assymetric grind knife that is not clad ?
 

tk59

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Asymmetric edges are always thinner and thus "sharper" than the corresponding symmetric edge. If the bevels are large enough it can also aid in food separation.
 

stevenStefano

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I think my edges resemble the second one but reversed because I'm a lefty. I just sharpen both sides until I get a burr and one side always takes way less time than the other, so I guess my edges are asymmetric but it's almost incidental. Something I am curious about, the way it seems that most knives are asymmetric ground, does this mean even if I buy a 50/50 knife I am still getting screwed for being left handed?
 

dbesed

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If the grind is assymetric for a right person and the bevel is 50/50 than i'm sorrry, but yes :)
 

Benuser

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I think my edges resemble the second one but reversed because I'm a lefty. I just sharpen both sides until I get a burr and one side always takes way less time than the other, so I guess my edges are asymmetric but it's almost incidental. Something I am curious about, the way it seems that most knives are asymmetric ground, does this mean even if I buy a 50/50 knife I am still getting screwed for being left handed?
I don't think so. Most european knives have asymmetric blades as well, but have symmetric edges. The europeans have the left side convex and the right one flat, though. I'm right handed and imagine, these europeans feel to me exactly like a japanese with a symmetric edge should feel to you. Am I wrong?
 

dbesed

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I don't think so. Most european knives have asymmetric blades as well, but have symmetric edges. The europeans have the left side convex and the right one flat, though. I'm right handed and imagine, these europeans feel to me exactly like a japanese with a symmetric edge should feel to you. Am I wrong?
Yes. But what is the advantage of having the convex side on contact with the food that you hold with your nondominant hand? If the convex side help with food release i don't think there are any. I could be wrong though. :)
 

Benuser

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I noticed that since I got used to the flat left side of japanese knives, I turn the european counterclockwise while cutting to keap the blade as close as possible to the food. The major reason for having both sides different is avoiding wedging.
 
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