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Noodle Soup

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Ha! Err... yes... I mostly bought it cos it looks cool.

Having said that - whenever I buy a new cleaver my wife's response goes along the lines of: 'Can I use it to go through bones? If not then it's not a real cleaver is it.' So hopefully it'll keep her happy. And her father is a cattle farmer and we often have cows (or parts thereof) in the freezer, so it might get to see some real work too.

(Not that I'd have the faintest idea about how to butcher a cow!)
Like I said, I brought one home from my first trip to China too. They actually make those in the same dimensions but different weights. Thin ones for slicing meat and heavy ones for chopping through bones. You can't tell the difference without picking them up and looking at the spine thickness.
 

cotedupy

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Like I said, I brought one home from my first trip to China too. They actually make those in the same dimensions but different weights. Thin ones for slicing meat and heavy ones for chopping through bones. You can't tell the difference without picking them up and looking at the spine thickness.
Aye. This one should go through bones, though perhaps not cow bones.

(I've noticed with a few brands that you can tell also by the handle: With the handles that have four grooves in them being used for slicers, and handles with lots of grooves used for bones/butchery knives.)
 

cotedupy

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how high/what angle should the bevel be on a cleaver?
Something I do, which seems to work for me, and is pretty convenient is take the sharpening angle as the width of my thumb at the spine. (For 90 - 100mm tall Caidao.)

If I could remember anything about geometry from school I'd measure my thumb and work the angle out for you. But I can't.
 

ian

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Something I do, which seems to work for me, and is pretty convenient is take the sharpening angle as the width of my thumb at the spine. (For 90 - 100mm tall Caidao.)

If I could remember anything about geometry from school I'd measure my thumb and work the angle out for you. But I can't.
That would be around 15 degrees with my thumb.

In general, if you want the angle, type

“arcsin( 25 / 100 ) in degrees” into google search, replacing 25 with the width of your thumb (or generally, the height of the spine when sharpening) in mm and replacing 100 with the height of the cleaver.

If you know the angle you want, say 15 degrees, type

“100 sin(15 degrees)”

into google search, replacing 100 with the height of the cleaver and 15 with your desired angle, and it’ll spit out the height you need the spine
 
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BillHanna

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What do you think of the Daovua?
Not much. I only use it to make big pieces of meat into smaller, irregular pieces of meat. I might attempt to sell it, or throw it in with my next sale. I'm eyeing up a Matsubara shiro 1 cleaver on CKTG, now.
 

cotedupy

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That would be around 15 degrees with my thumb
That sounds about right. My angle may be a touch bigger; I thought I did them just a little higher angle than most of my knives... but maybe not.

[Edit - yeah just worked mine out - comes out about pretty much 15 degrees too.]
 
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captaincaed

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That would be around 15 degrees with my thumb.

In general, if you want the angle, type

“arcsin( 25 / 100 ) in degrees” into google search, replacing 25 with the width of your thumb (or generally, the height of the spine when sharpening) in mm and replacing 100 with the height of the cleaver.

If you know the angle you want, say 15 degrees, type

“100 sin(15 degrees)”

into google search, replacing 100 with the height of the cleaver and 15 with your desired angle, and it’ll spit out the height you need the spine
I think this should get pinned to your knife definitions note. Or maybe we need a new pinned note in the sharpening section. Gangsta.
 

GorillaGrunt

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I really like mine. Probably one of my favorite light veg. work Chinese (Viet) cleavers. Kind of replaced the one I bought in Hanoi but then I'm always finding a new favorite. This is a hobby not a profession these days.
i like mine too, I’d call it better value than CcK for the comparable price. Mine is definitely not straight, looking at it makes me think there’s no way this thing should cut right — but somehow it does and easily too.
 

cotedupy

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That would be around 15 degrees with my thumb.

In general, if you want the angle, type

“arcsin( 25 / 100 ) in degrees” into google search, replacing 25 with the width of your thumb (or generally, the height of the spine when sharpening) in mm and replacing 100 with the height of the cleaver.

If you know the angle you want, say 15 degrees, type

“100 sin(15 degrees)”

into google search, replacing 100 with the height of the cleaver and 15 with your desired angle, and it’ll spit out the height you need the spine
Ah yes... trigonometry... It's all coming back to me now. SOH CAH TOA, and smoking behind the bike sheds.
 
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BillHanna

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I just quickly touched up my CCK1303 for the first time(shapton 1500). That first slice into a potato made me cackle. I stopped after 1.5 spuds to share this. That is all.

Bored Person reading this that doesn’t have one. Buy one from action sales. Supply15 is the discount code. Do it.
 
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cotedupy

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Nice sunny day here, so I thought I'd do a lineup of what I currently have.

On top: Shibata Tinker Tank. Then from L to R: Leung Tim Kau Kong, Two Lions #3 (going soon as a present for someone), Leung Tim Sangdao #2, CCK 1302, Leung Tim Slicer (equivalent of 1103), CCK 2204 Rhino.

I do actually have another Leung Tim which I'm going to do a bit of restoring on. And a Two Lions bone cleaver as well, but I've no idea where that is. Seems quite a conspicuous thing to have lost.

IMG-1051.jpg


As I was composing this picture I used one of them to kill not one, but two, White Tips. It often goes unremarked upon but one of the key features of the design of caidao is the flat of the blade - perfectly engineered for smacking down hard... THWACK!... on poisonous spiders. Or garlic or whatever if you live in a less 'exciting' country.
 
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peterm

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This inspired me to dig out my veggie slicer cleavers. CCK on top; left to right is Sugimoto, Ashi, Pierre Rodrigue w/ Alabama damascus, Hattori forum knife. I need more hands!
PXL_20210503_182826143.jpg
 

boomchakabowwow

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I want to play.

I only have two. but the CCK 1303 gets the nod 90% of the time. I have to consciously make an effort to use another knife. small cuts, big cuts, a cleaver gets it done.

they are so important to me, they ride shotgun. all other blades are in a dark drawer. :). they are both shaving sharp. the Taiwan one might be sharper, I am slowly working a blade ding out of it. me being dumb.

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demcav

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A new cleaver in the house...

Blade is 52100, 203mm x 95mm (8" x 3.75"), 297 grams, with integral bolster, forced patina (vinegar)
Handle and saya pen - stabilized Bog Oak
Saya - Rainbow Poplar

This was a custom order from Steve Grosvenor (Red Rock Tools in South Dakota) that arrived today. A Tall Gyuto that I have from Steve inspired me to request a Chinese cleaver from him, also. Steve is great to work with and produced exactly what I asked for. It's based on my CCK, but with some very *special* upgrades! The balance point is right at the pinch grip.
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boomchakabowwow

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damn. that is a fine looking cleaver? how does it cut?

tempted to email the guy and ask if he could make me a 4.5" paring knife..hmmm
 

demcav

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I used it to make a mushroom soup tonight. Onions and celery are a fine dice and mushrooms are thinly sliced. As you can see, this knife had no problem with either of the cuts, and it is VERY comfortable in the hand. I'd say contact Steve about what you want in a parer, and he will very honestly work with you to give you what you would like to have.
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