Best bit for deep holes

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Danzo, Dec 3, 2018.

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  1. Dec 3, 2018 #1

    Danzo

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    hey dudes. Been looking for a more effective bit for boring out the main hole in a wa handle. I make my handles with a internal dowel, currently using a Brad point bit. How are forstner or auger bits for this task? What’s the best bit for drilling deep holes 4+ inches?
    Thanks
     
  2. Dec 3, 2018 #2

    Yet-Another-Dave

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    I'd expect a brad point bit to work best for that. Better quality brad point, better support for the handle, drill press rather than freehand, etc. all might help a little. Unless your bit is dull, or damaged or miss-manufactured in someway, I expect your improvements will be slight, incremental, and subtle though.
     
  3. Dec 3, 2018 #3

    Spipet

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    So many jokes...
     
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  4. Dec 3, 2018 #4

    Danzo

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    I find the Brad point has lots of friction along the walls of the hole it drills. Harder to get deeper without the hole getting hot and filling with compacted sawdust. Wouldn’t a forstner be better for that reason?
     
  5. Dec 3, 2018 #5

    OneStaple

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    Forstner bits make clean holes, but they're not great for deep holes. Or, in my opinion, for end grain of hard/dense woods. And they're usually fairly short bits, making a deep hole difficult/impossible even in you tried.

    I would use brad point bits. I've used them before for this application in desert ironwood, which is very hard. Just back the bit out periodically to clear the chips. A drill press is a huge help.

    Tyler
     
  6. Dec 3, 2018 #6

    Yet-Another-Dave

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    +1 what he said.

    A forstner bit would have more clearance, but if clearing chips is your problem it's generally considered the worst choice (since it can't lift chips beyond it's short flutes.

    I don't know if your expectations are too high or if there is something funny with your bit. It might be worth trying a different bit, but it might just be technique. (The Lee Valley HSS brad-point bits are the best I know that are commonly sold retail. There are several other brands as highly rated, but the seem to be sold more through industrial suppliers.)

    ETA: I should have ask what diameter hole you are drilling? (I assumed about 3/8". As diameter goes up there's a transition to preferring forstner bits. I suppose it starts about 1/2", but until about 1" diameter I don't automatically reach for a forstner bit.) I'm not sure about linking to non-sponsor sites, but LV has an info page on brad-point & forstner bit profiles that fits this discussion: http://www.leevalley.com/us/Wood/page.aspx?p=45534&cat=1,180,42240
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2018
  7. Dec 4, 2018 #7

    JoBone

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    I use the colt 5 star 1/2” off of Amazon and have been very happy with it. After reading this post, I may try the lee Valley one next time
     
  8. Dec 4, 2018 #8

    Danzo

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    I drill 1/2 inche holes. I’ll test out some different ones before my next upcoming projects. Thanks
     
  9. Dec 4, 2018 #9

    HRC_64

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    Last edited: Dec 4, 2018
  10. Dec 4, 2018 #10

    dmccurtis

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  11. Dec 4, 2018 #11

    Yet-Another-Dave

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    What brand of drill have you been using? I'm still curious if your specific drill bit explains the problems you've had.
     
  12. Dec 5, 2018 #12

    Danzo

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    I have a dumpy central machinery press. It’s not very nice but the chuck is true.
     
  13. Dec 5, 2018 #13

    Yet-Another-Dave

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    If it runs true, it shouldn't cause any trouble. What about the drill bit itself? I've had mixed results from bits I've gotten at big box stores. (Not that I've done any careful testing. The ones that worked, may have just had easy tasks.) The few that haven't been very good, again without much careful checking, seem to have various problems: dull, out-of-round, and flat out crooked. If clearing chips more often doesn't solve your problem, hopefully it's fixed by something easy like a different bit. Anyway, good luck!
     
  14. Dec 5, 2018 #14

    Danzo

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    Yeah I will likely go get myself a nice bit. I really only need the one size so price won’t get too bad. Eventually I will upgrade my press to a floor model.
     
  15. Dec 6, 2018 #15

    Dendrobatez

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    I use a small Brad point as a guide hole and then use a traditional twist bit to step it up to 8mm (the dowel size I use) - I've broken a lot of bits to figure out this is what works best for me.
    The brad points tend to really get clogged up on the woods I use and then don't stay straight.
     
  16. Dec 6, 2018 #16

    HSC3

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    if you are drilling a 1/2" hole about 4" deep I would say the brad point is your best bet, most efficient and cost effective.

    If you want real efficient cutting performance, you need a rigid setup and a real mill.

    Clearing out the flutes with clogged material is simply part of the process.
    also check your spindle speed for that size drill bit.
     
  17. Dec 8, 2018 #17

    RDalman

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    I have a specialty one extra long similar to the lee valley one linked fluted, but with brad point.
     
  18. Dec 12, 2018 #18

    Dan P.

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  19. Dec 13, 2018 #19

    Danzo

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  20. Dec 13, 2018 #20

    Migraine

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    This forum. I've found it's drilling me into some very deep holes.
     
  21. Jan 1, 2019 #21

    Tim Rowland

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