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Best coarse stone for crap steel

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ian

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The glass 500 should be plenty fast for stuff like wusthof/vnox, even with a couple chips.
+1 on the Shapton 500 glass (get the double thick version).
I have a SG 500, and it’s a nice stone. I’d only start with it if the knife was in really good condition, though, and was already semi sharp.

slowly dawning realization I should not hurt myself using a stone where a power tool made more sense
amen. maybe the real solution is to stop sharpening crap knives until I live in a situation where a belt sander is possible.
 

ref

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I have a SG 500, and it’s a nice stone. I’d only start with it if the knife was in really good condition, though, and was already semi sharp.
Have you tried using lots of pressure, after a fresh resurfacing? I am probably misremembering how look those crappy knives took me though...
 

ian

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Yea, they usually come with small chips, and enough fatigued steel that even with a 120 grit stone it takes me a few minutes to get a consistent burr.
 
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OK I wanted to get some sessions in with the Pride Abrasive 220/1000 combo stone before I posted my thoughts. I got that, along with the 8K/10K stone as well. I've had a few sessions spaced a few days apart to really let this set in, so here's what I can report back.

Speaking to the 220 grit stone specifically, I can say:
-It DOES remove material fast, and brings up a burr almost instantly on cheaper knives. I did NOT try this out on any good knives with higher quality and harder steels as I would not want to eat away that much metal and had no need to do so.

- It is hard and thirsty. I let mine soak for almost an hour while I was finishing up another project and it still needed way more water than any other stone I have as I went along. It has a very hard feel, and is loud enough to sound like you are murdering your knife on it.

- It leaves a "decent" finish, but I don't have much to compare it to other than an 300 grit Ultrasharp plate, as I have never used a stone this coarse before. It was sharp coming off the stone, but not like coming off a Shapton Glass 500.

- It leaves an almost sand-like slurry. I wouldn't even call it a mud, but it actually feels like sand. Very much a PITA to clean up.

Bottom line for me was that it worked well for hogging off metal and resetting a messed up bevel pretty quickly. I was not a real fan of using it, OR the 1K side, but your mileage may vary.

I will probably end up selling this one down the road, as I feel more comfortable using a diamond plate or a Shapton Glass 220 stone than this.

That said, this 220/1K may work well for somebody who is just using it as a fixer/1st stone, as you can work up a burr and move off it very quickly.
 

spaceconvoy

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... I basically do all the work on a 200ish grit stone, setting a pretty acute angle, then jump up to 500ish, polish the acute bevel and set another more conservative one, and strop on cardboard...
I noticed this in your other thread but didn't want to derail the discussion. Have you settled on a favorite 200ish grit, or is the common wisdom correct that they're all different shades of terrible?
 

ian

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Sigma 240’s pretty good. Loses water quickly, but it’s very fast. I’ve also been enjoying SG 220, although I haven’t used it enough to give a full review.
 

cotedupy

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Interesting thread, cheers!

I personally use a cheap combi oilstone atm, it doesn't say but the sides are apparently around 150 and 400. Works alright, but feels like crap.

I think I'll probably upgrade soon, and leave major removal for the belt sander, so good to read some recs here :)
 

spaceconvoy

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Sigma 240’s pretty good. Loses water quickly, but it’s very fast. I’ve also been enjoying SG 220, although I haven’t used it enough to give a full review.
Thanks for the update. Lately I've been feeling the GS500 is somewhat pointless preceding the SP1500 (which is perfect for setting up my medium-fine naturals). I ordered the medium Crystolon on a whim, I'll have to try the Sigma 240 if that doesn't work. Either way I suspect that SiC is the way to go for extra coarse stones.
 
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