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Best edge for a beater knife?

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Benuser

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Usually I manage to get knives like this sharp, using coarse diamond plates or SiC stones. If you have any, give them a try.

Sharp doesn't guarantee retention for that usage scenario, though. I would also test the edge a bit. See just how soft the alloys is.

If you get these from a couple of known low HRC knives while hitting your edge, things won't be pretty.

View attachment 74015
Nice photo...
Carbide clusters falling out??
 

kayman67

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I'm not sure. It's interesting how different knives made different "cuts".
 

Desert Rat

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I deal with those kind of knifes on a old Norton 313 with two crystolon stones and a fine india. I just raise the blade a few degrees at each stone progression approximating a convex bevel. If I am looking for a really toothy edge on a carbon steel knife a fine India works well.
 

Cloudsmoker

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Maybe it’s time for you to pick up a belt grinder?
You know, I was about to say that. I worked on a couple of beaters about the same look and vintage. My guess was that years of cleaning in the dishwasher was to blame (not sure why, but I was looking for something to blame besides my limited sharpening skills). Finally, I gave the belt sander a try, with a 320 grit belt, and the beater blade sharpened right up - at least for a few strokes. I would never have admitted any of this except for Michi confessing first.
 

Michi

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I would never have admitted any of this except for Michi confessing first.
It’s alright, you can trust us around here, we won’t tell. Besides, we all have our dark little secrets. (I used an oilstone once.)

As penance, all you need to do is sharpen five proper knives on stones, and the blemish of the beater and the belt sander will be washed away.
 

Michi

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Ugh. How about thinning/sharpening a Shun Ken Onion, 2 Wusthof Pro's, a Wusthof Ikon Nakiri, a Kiwi or two and whatever house knives are around (I think somewhere around 7-10?)
I do believe that this would constitute sufficient penance :)
 

RDalman

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I will agree with the belt grinder for beater edges. I run them on slack and raise and flip a burr on 60 grit. Flip it again couple of times on 240 grit, then deburr it on a polishing wax loaded felt wheel.
 

Michi

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I will agree with the belt grinder for beater edges. I run them on slack and raise and flip a burr on 60 grit. Flip it again couple of times on 240 grit, then deburr it on a polishing wax loaded felt wheel.
If I read this correctly, you are telling me that it's actually possible to get one of these abominations sharp that way?

If so, I'd actually consider buying a belt grinder. Any suggestions as to what model? (Casual domestic use.)

Edited to add:

60 grit on a kitchen knife? Please, don't do that to me again. I'm getting old, and there is only so much my poor ageing heart can take…
 
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RDalman

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If I read this correctly, you are telling me that it's actually possible to get one of these abominations sharp that way?

If so, I'd actually consider buying a belt grinder. Any suggestions as to what model? (Casual domestic use.)

Edited to add:

60 grit on a kitchen knife? Please, don't do that to me again. I'm getting old, and there is only so much my poor ageing heart can take…
Hahaha Yes I have yet to be stumped actually this way. :D
 

vicv

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60 grit is fine. You're removing metal to remove chips and a thick edge. You want as course of a belt as you can find. They grind faster and cooler. 36 grit is even better!
 

Midsummer

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60 grit is fine. You're removing metal to remove chips and a thick edge. You want as course of a belt as you can find. They grind faster and cooler. 36 grit is even better!
So he can get it sharp with the grinder. But, we are missing 1/2 of the equation. The knife is going to be used to cut frozen food. (see OP)
 

Cloudsmoker

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As for belt sanders, I already had one I use for woodworking. But, if I were in the market, I'd look hard at this one: Ricoh 1x30 variable speed. The 1x30 belts are fairly inexpensive, plentiful and available in every grit and material, including leather strops. The variable speed is a feature that would be worthwhile as well. Some guys turn these into a knife sharpening machine -
 

Marek07

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For what it's worth, the knife was originally purchased at Ikea about 30 years ago. Some kind of generic stainless steel; it says "Molybdenum/Vanadium, Made in Japan" on the blade.
The current range of Ikea 365+ knives are by no means stellar - but they are fairly easy to sharpen and represent good value for many IMO. Have often gifted them to friends - mainly Kiwi users (see below).
Good idea it is time to give up. One day you should get yourself a belt grinder just for this type of work. They are very handy
Maybe it’s time for you to pick up a belt grinder?
A cheap belt grinder is a welcome addition to one's armoury. After spending 45 min sharpening a very abused Kiwi, I thought Wt*?!? Why spend so much time on a $3 knife. Just buy a new one. Or... 1 min on a belt plus a couple of minutes on a stone and presto - mission accomplished. :D
 

Marek07

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I like your approach! I mean, why spend $3 on a new knife when I can spend $165 on a new belt sander? :D
My basic belt sander cost $65. Divide that by a few dozen Kiwis and assorted crap knives and it becomes very cost efficient. Regardless, I don't charge for sharpening - just enjoy the challenge.
 

Benuser

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Had to repair Tojiro DP Honesuki and Yo-deba, VG-10 core. Did it with coarse stones, GS 120, 220, 320. Lot of work. Wasn't that satisfied with result. Some facetting. Started again with somewhat worn P240. Medium pressure, edge trailing, on dominant side only. Less than 10 strokes needed. Went after that on Chosera 400. Give it a try.
 

Michi

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Started again with somewhat worn P240. Medium pressure, edge trailing, on dominant side only. Less than 10 strokes needed. Went after that on Chosera 400. Give it a try.
Thanks for the tip! I had a look at belt sanders, and I don't want to do it to myself. It would get used maybe once a year, and would end up being yet another piece of gear to clutter up the workshop.

P240 takes up a lot less room and is dirt-cheap, so that'll be my choice next time. For now, the knife is cutting well enough. And I hate the dang thing sufficiently by now that I don't want to go back and start again.

On the up-side, my ego is on the road to recovery… ;)
 
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