bikes bikes bikes

Discussion in 'The Off Topic Room' started by inferno, Aug 18, 2019.

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  1. Aug 18, 2019 #1

    inferno

    inferno

    inferno

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    post your bike(s). i guess many of you have a bike. i do too. i have 5 actually. and no car.
    what do like about your bike? do you use your bike? i use my bikes every day.

    this is my latest bike, its a budget build. i got the frame for about 1300€ or so. instead of 3300.
    too bad the weather wasn't too great this summer so i have only used it about 10 times or so.

    bike1.JPG
    bike2.JPG
     
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  2. Aug 18, 2019 #2

    rob

    rob

    rob

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    Jeff Jones titanium spaceframe.

    I was into down hill mountain biking when I was younger, not so much anymore.

    The Jones is a great all rounder. I have two sets of wheels, semi slicks for road riding and fat front knobby rear for off road.




    IMG_0115.JPG IMG_0124.JPG
     
  3. Aug 22, 2019 #3

    JoeWheels

    JoeWheels

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  4. Aug 22, 2019 #4

    lumo

    lumo

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    GreyBoy, Matt Zilliox, WPerry and 5 others like this.
  5. Aug 22, 2019 #5

    Brian Weekley

    Brian Weekley

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    Haven’t been without a bike since I was 14 ... I’m 70! Here’s my current bike ... and my 8yr old son waiting to get a bike of his own.

    AFC3D08B-95BD-4E4C-AE0F-027C79C0A76F.jpeg 9EB06C01-A9F4-4BC4-84EA-BB9FD6993EEA.jpeg
     
  6. Aug 22, 2019 #6

    valgard

    valgard

    valgard

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    My bike, which I use almost daily for the 3-4 month the weather allows it is around 30 years old and probably the equivalent of an IKEA gyuto... I should probably get a better bike, but they have gotten my current one out of the way to steal other bikes and left mine there so there's that lol.
     
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  7. Aug 22, 2019 #7

    CB1968

    CB1968

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  8. Aug 23, 2019 #8

    CoteRotie

    CoteRotie

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    I'm on travel so I can't post pics, but I have a Serotta titanium frame road bike with Campy Chorus/Record and a Santa Cruz 5010 mountain bike. The Serotta is a great frame, I was bummed when Ben Serotta went out of business, but I hear he's started up a bike design firm.
     
  9. Aug 23, 2019 #9

    McMan

    McMan

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  10. Aug 23, 2019 #10

    parbaked

    parbaked

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    My Pegoretti...RIP Dario:
    SNC11434.jpg
    SNC11246.jpg
     
  11. Aug 23, 2019 #11

    Brian Weekley

    Brian Weekley

    Brian Weekley

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    I started out on a 1962 Honda 50 Sport! New bike ... cost me $335. Worked as a packer at Safeway for $1.10 an hr after school to buy it. Countless bikes thereafter.

    I love the bottle holders on the push bikes ... when I bought my first bike I don’t think plastic had been invented yet!
     
  12. Aug 23, 2019 #12

    Namaxy

    Namaxy

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    Love this one. Deserves more cleaning..... MB.jpg
     
  13. Aug 23, 2019 #13

    Nemo

    Nemo

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    My old trail bike is the original Mach 5 (26er). Great bike although it has a pretty long wheelbase compared to more modern frames, even some 29ers. Nonetheless, it perfoms almost as well as my Trek Fuel 29er.
     
  14. Aug 23, 2019 #14

    panda

    panda

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    i dont have one, but if i did it would be a steel frame custom seven roadbike.
     
  15. Aug 23, 2019 #15

    lumo

    lumo

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  16. Aug 23, 2019 #16

    JBroida

    JBroida

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    Just getting into road bikes myself... specialized allez elite to start IMG_1190.jpg

    Excuse the mess... I keep it on a trainer in my living room so I can also bike in front of my tv for any mma fights I want to watch
     
  17. Aug 23, 2019 #17

    labor of love

    labor of love

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    I purchased the exact same bike from a local shop after testing 4 different bikes in different price ranges.
    Because I’m very new to bikes myself I could hardly discern a difference really in use between this model and something twice the price. But definitely preferred it over cheaper options.
    The salesman told me that my wallet was quite fortunate haha.
    Anyway it’s served me well.
     
  18. Aug 23, 2019 #18

    inferno

    inferno

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  19. Aug 23, 2019 #19

    parbaked

    parbaked

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    2 different bikes, one is a Duende the other is a Fina Estampa
     
  20. Aug 23, 2019 #20

    inferno

    inferno

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    you will usually get an ok bike for a grand or so. what you are paying for with more expensive models is lighter components. more durable components, sometimes a lot better functioning components. and usually a carbon frame or lighter carbon frame.

    I mean like wheels. you can pay pay a grand or 2 for wheels and they roll just as good/bad as the cheapest shimano ones.
    I actually run the very cheapest shimano road wheels on the de rosa lol. works fine for me. didn't even have to build them myself this time.

    The things i would swap out on cheap bikes, talking road bikes is this:
    tires
    handlebars (and probably stem, for better suiting length)
    saddle (asses are totally individual)
    pedals (i need to ride with all types of shoes)
    middle ring up front (i would convert it to single ring up front, probably a 42 or 44)

    no real money there, just ergos pretty much. and some personal prefs.


    and then i would do this (you basically have to do this with all bikes when new if you want them to last):

    disassemble the entire bike and lube all bolts, nuts, cables and housings, and if steel; also the internals of the tubes so they dont rust.
    Then lube seatpost and seat tube.
    Crack open the hubs and lube all bearings and the mech (you HAVE to do this with shimanos hubs when new), also set correct bearing preload of the hubs.
    Lube the BB bearings and the headset bearings if not sealed cartridge ones (i do however open up shimano external cup ones and fill with correct grease).
    Spray teflon/moly spray inside the shifter mech.

    Then i wont have to touch it for several years except for swapping cassettes/chains/chainrings/pads.

    This is where it makes sense to buy frames separately. You dont have to disassemble anything... :) just assemble
     
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  21. Aug 23, 2019 #21

    inferno

    inferno

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    i see. It looks like the seatstays are beefier on one of them. is it so or just an illusion?
     
  22. Aug 23, 2019 #22

    labor of love

    labor of love

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    :eek::eek::eek:
     
  23. Aug 23, 2019 #23

    parbaked

    parbaked

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    Yes...Duende is steel so the tubes are smaller diameter.
    Fina is aluminum and has beefy tubes and dropouts for a road bike.
    SNC11250.jpg
     
  24. Aug 23, 2019 #24

    inferno

    inferno

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    an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
     
  25. Aug 23, 2019 #25

    inferno

    inferno

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    of yeah i almost forgot. after riding for a month or so i always retension the wheels. so they are bombproof. almost all non custom built wheels needs retensioning pretty quickly if you want them to last. you would need special stuff for this if you do it yourself.
     
  26. Aug 24, 2019 #26

    HRC_64

    HRC_64

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    +1... Also, these are the worth the hit to you bank account :D

    [​IMG]
     
  27. Aug 24, 2019 #27

    Nemo

    Nemo

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    Yep, there is definitely a law of diminishing returns. If you are not riding competitively, 1-2K USD is probably a good staring point. Of course, it's every bit as big a rabbit hole as kitchen knives, so the sky is the limit...

    Alloy frames work fine and modern hydroformed alloy frames are only a few hundred grammes heavier than carbon. Carbon frames can help take some of the road buzz/ vibrations and they can be a bit stiffer laterally. Unfortunately, carbon frames are a bit easier to break. My Trek Domane is currently in the shop with a crack in the bottom bracket caused by a dropped chain.

    Cheap wheels make sense if you are just riding along. However, they are usually machine built, so the spoke tensions are all over the place (I retension all new wheels before I ride on them). More expensive wheels are lighter and rotating mass makes more difference than static mass. The weight of pedals and shoes is important here as well. But really only if you are riding near your limit. I built my everyday wheels to be tough and easy to fix: Alloy rims, 32 spokes laced 3 cross. I used Shimano Dura-Ace or Hope hubs which are not cheap but not super expensive, are reasonably light and easy to maintain.

    Very expensive road wheels often have wind tunnel tested aeorofoil rim designs which reduce drag. I pretty much disregard any drag reduction claims that aren't backed up by wind tunnel data, even if they are designed with a CFD (computational flow dynamics) package. Wind tunnel testing is expensive and so are the wheels that come out of them. Generally only the big companies have enough sales volume to be able to afford wind tunnel testing, even on expensive wheels.

    Note that power loss against wind is related to the cube of velocity (drag is related to the square of velocity and p = f.v) and most wind tinnel testing is in the 40-45 kph (30ish mph) range, so if you are not riding at these speeds (or you are being protected from the wind by riding in a bunch), you are not getting nearly as much power benefit as advertised.

    Proponents of aero wheels (i.e.: those trying to sell them to you) counter that slower riders are riding with a higher yaw angle (angle at which the wind hits the wheel relative to its forward motion) And that most aero wheels have lower drag at middling yaw angles (say 10-20 degress, depending on the wheel). This is true, but it doesn't come close to overpowering the law of cubes, so some perspective is needed.

    Aero wheels are often deep rimmed, so heavier and more prone to being blown off course by sideways wind than shallower rimmed wheels. They make sense when competing. Not so much for everyday riding. Except for the bling factor. They definitely add bling.

    On lubing: I agree: lube all pivots and cables. DO NOT allow any lube to get onto your braking surfaces (pads, rims or discs). Do not lube carbon seatposts (you may need to use a carbon grip compound to stop it from slipping).

    If you are going to work on bikes a lot (especially those with carbon components), buy a torque wrench and tighten all bolts only to spec.

    As mentioned, many hubs and bearings now days are cartridge bearings and are not really user servicible. They have the benefit of not needing to be tensioned 'just so', which can be a pain in the proverbial because the tension in the nut while you are tightening it is slightly highrer than the tension once you stop tightening. Shimano hubs are still cup and cone, which has the benefit of dealing better with sideways forces. The higher end ones (Ultegra and Dura-Ace IIRC) have a very clever tensioning system which is much easier to adjust than old fashioned nut secured cup and cone bearings.

    The problem with buying a frame and building a groupset on it is that when you buy a new complete bike, the groupset is heavily discounted. So unless you already have a groupset to put on the bike, you will be out of pocket.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2019
  28. Aug 24, 2019 #28

    milkbaby

    milkbaby

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    I like my bicycles like I like my knives: too many

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    I have more but pics not saved on Imgur to share, oh well. I need to stop being fat and get back into shape like I used to be. Four years ago I remember that I rode something like 1500+ miles (>2400 kilometers) in one month while working full time and running 140 miles during that month as well... Now I'm just an average fatty, oh well.

    [​IMG]
     
  29. Aug 24, 2019 #29

    inferno

    inferno

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    I saw some youtube vids where they ride around an oval outside at a set power output. i think they gained 1km/h or so with aero wheels (think it was enve) and maybe 0,5-1km/h with an aero frame. and iirc about 1,5-2km/h with both aero wheels and frame. that was at about 40km/h.

    so for me that wont matter. i'm averaging like 25-30km/h. I think my best average to work is 32km/h (half the route is through residential areas).

    I build all my own wheels usually and my letest was h plus son archetype rims with dt 240 hubs, and updated ratchets, 28-32 dt comps 1,8-2,0. usually i run dt rims since they build up very easy. always 32-32. i like the durability.
    --------

    I'm also trying my best to avoid carbon fiber stuff. i like metals. so steel or ti frames for me. i also like handmade stuff thats why i like the italian lugged frames. they ride great.
     
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  30. Aug 24, 2019 #30

    Nemo

    Nemo

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    My first wheel build was on an Archetype rim. So easy to build compared to some of the flimsier rims around.
     

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