Bog Oak Handles?

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by Mjdavid, Nov 23, 2018.

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  1. Nov 23, 2018 #1

    Mjdavid

    Mjdavid

    Mjdavid

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    ...or similar.
    I need a good source (stateside) who can rehandle a new KonoFUJI 240FM...I’m not liking the stock khii laurel handle that it came with. It’s too narrow and light for my taste.
    I’ve always admired the Bryan Raquin style handles but never held one.
    I’ve learned that I prefer larger diameter handles that taper into a harmonious connection to the neck of the blade...something not often found on JKnives.

    I welcome your comments and opinions.
     
  2. Nov 23, 2018 #2

    labor of love

    labor of love

    labor of love

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    I’ll have a bog oak handle w blonde ferrule available soon if you can wait another month or 2.
     
  3. Nov 23, 2018 #3

    Mjdavid

    Mjdavid

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    I’m sure I’ll be interested. Can you show me how it looks on the blade you’re using?
     
  4. Nov 24, 2018 #4

    Bensbites

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    Just out of curiosity, can you post a photo of the style/design/cut you are looking for? Big oak can be found from a variety of sources. So can ebony/Blackwood. If you want something sustainably harvested, pakkawood.
     
  5. Nov 24, 2018 #5

    panda

    panda

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    shoot member Dendrobatez a private message, he is a local chef friend of mine that recently started handle making is doing some great work, maybe he can help you out as he's done a few handles for me already.
     
  6. Nov 24, 2018 #6

    RDalman

    RDalman

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    I think what Bryan does is regular oak that he scorches and treats with oil. Might be something to consider also.
     
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  7. Nov 24, 2018 #7

    tgfencer

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    Robin is correct. Also, the type of wood you use and how you burn it will largely impact how open and grippy the fibers of the wood are. A light burning is really just for aesthetics, but a longer, deeper burn makes the grain pull apart and gives that characteristic burnt chestnut handle feel and look.
     
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  8. Nov 25, 2018 #8

    Mjdavid

    Mjdavid

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    In general, the best description of what I’m looking for, is the style of handles seen on Bryan Raquin, Pendergast, and some of Robert Tramarchi’s knives. The dark, grainy rustic look...the look of a well used tool. I like neutral tones too depending on the blade I want to upgrade.
    Beyond that I can tell you that I would be able to put more specifications on it because I have multiple knives I’d like to handle.
    In short, I like rustic one piece handles.
     
  9. Nov 25, 2018 #9

    Dendrobatez

    Dendrobatez

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    I'm a big fan of both shou-sugi ban style and single peice handles. Shou-sugi ban handles are great for pro kitchen usage as they offer a lot more grip at a high grit finish even when wet. My personal preference right now is a naturally figured peice of wood and a brass bolster that will patina, shape is octogon top and round bottom.

    Baze (on Instagram) made my favorite handle just because it was so "simple" and rustic but really showed off the character of the blade.
    https://www.instagram.com/p/BkXh6gygCeR/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2018
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  10. Nov 27, 2018 #10

    milkbaby

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    You can texturize oak with flame like burnt chestnut wa handles and it will have a lot of character. It is very grippy. This is a handle of a wooden knife that I burnt, brushed with a wire brush, and then sealed with cyanoacrylate glue. If you look up bog oak (smoking) pipes, you can find similar texturized look. You can burn other woods too, but depending on the grain it will have different texture.

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. Nov 27, 2018 #11

    labor of love

    labor of love

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    Very cool milkbaby.
     
  12. Nov 27, 2018 #12

    panda

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    That looks hella grippy!!
     
  13. Nov 27, 2018 #13

    Dendrobatez

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    That's cool milkbaby. Burning oak always made a lot of sense to me, it is part of the process for oak bourbon barrels after all.
     
  14. Nov 27, 2018 #14

    slobound

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    That looks awesome! I’m gonna have to try that.
     
  15. Nov 28, 2018 #15

    JoBone

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    I like the burnt look, but tend to see it more with Chestnut over Oak. Nice photo.
     

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