Cannot get my Tanaka Blue 1 to be as sharp as my Kaeru SLD and I'm stumped

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I recently got a Tanaka Kyuzo Blue 1, the sharpness OOTB was less than ideal so I brought it to my Shapton 2k. The same stone I've used to get all my previous knives sharp enough to slice paper towels, including a Kaeru SLD and a Swedish stainless petty.

As a beginner 1 year into this, I know my sharpening skills aren't up to par with anyone else, but I just couldn't understand why I cannot get this Tanaka Blue 1 to sharp enough as the rest of my knives. Right now, trying to get this Tanaka sharp is such a slog of a process, whereas sharpening every other knife has been much easier than I'm pretty much stumped on what to do.

If the more experienced forum members have tips or pointers on what to change I'm all ears, the stones I have are a Naniwa Pro 800 and a Shapton Pro 2k.
 
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Thanks for the pointers everyone. Guess I got away with it because my previous knives used softer steel.

I heard that Tanaka's Blue is suppose to be easy to sharpen, is this actually true or am I naive to expect it to be as easy to sharpen as White steel?
 

HumbleHomeCook

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Thanks for the pointers everyone. Guess I got away with it because my previous knives used softer steel.

I heard that Tanaka's Blue is suppose to be easy to sharpen, is this actually true or am I naive to expect it to be as easy to sharpen as White steel?

I can't speak to that specific steel sampling but keep in mind, it might be the starting condition of the edge. Yes, if it's harder that can add some complexity but if you're starting out with a rougher edge like it seems you did, then it will just need more work to get things set right. That's going to be true of any steel and 2k is rather fine for that kind of work.
 

ian

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Thanks for the pointers everyone. Guess I got away with it because my previous knives used softer steel.

I heard that Tanaka's Blue is suppose to be easy to sharpen, is this actually true or am I naive to expect it to be as easy to sharpen as White steel?

Idk, I’ve only had one Tanaka blue 1 and I found it took more work to move steel on it than on some others. It‘s really easy to deburr and you can get it quite sharp, but if the edge is in bad condition I can see it taking more time than you’re used to to correct it.
 
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Another thing to be aware of is deburring. Trying to deburr on a finer stone or pull the edge through a cork or a piece of wood :) It can make quite a difference.
 

esoo

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Thanks for the pointers everyone. Guess I got away with it because my previous knives used softer steel.

I heard that Tanaka's Blue is suppose to be easy to sharpen, is this actually true or am I naive to expect it to be as easy to sharpen as White steel?

I think it may vary from knife to knife. I had a FM White 2 that was a PITA to sharpen, but my FM White 1 nakiri is super easy (both of which are Tanaka knives)
 

Cliff

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Idk, I’ve only had one Tanaka blue 1 and I found it took more work to move steel on it than on some others. It‘s really easy to deburr and you can get it quite sharp, but if the edge is in bad condition I can see it taking more time than you’re used to to correct it.
This has been my experience with a couple of them. They are quite hard, so it may take a little work, but they deburr easily and take a great edge.
 

tostadas

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Thanks for the pointers everyone. Guess I got away with it because my previous knives used softer steel.

I heard that Tanaka's Blue is suppose to be easy to sharpen, is this actually true or am I naive to expect it to be as easy to sharpen as White steel?
The steel shouldnt be too hard to sharpen. If you've never taken the edge below 2k, you might want to go down to 1k or 500 to make sure the edge is properly apexed. If the edge is on the conservative side (ie: thick), it will take you a long time on a 2k to get there. But on a lower grit, it shouldnt take more than a couple minutes. It doesnt require a lot of metal removal, just make sure you get a burr on both sides before moving on.
 

Cliff

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Now that you mention it, this was true for me with a suji I got recently. I sharpened it with SG-1K, thinking the finish sharpening was already done, and really wasn't happy. I took it down to 320 and back up, and it is fantastic. It didn't take much work but did need some foundational work to sing.
 

M1k3

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I'll echo other members and suggest dropping down to a coarser stone and getting it sharp there. Then progress to higher grits.
 

superworrier

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Also consider the pressure level. Make sure you aren’t using too much pressure and forming a new burr. I had trouble with this moving to carbon because it sharpener much more easily.
 

Perverockstar

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If it works for you, I always use 1k to create an edge on a knife that does not need major correction.

Actually, with most of my knives, I stop there. I only jump to 6000 with a few selected knives.

I guess I'm not extremely exigent, but I feel that I always have all my knives quite sharp and ready to go. If the knive does not glide through ingredients, I'm not satisfied.

I just got a Tanaka but I haven't used it yet....

For the record, I work in a professional kitchen.
 
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I picked up a B1 Kagekiyo a while back. Still had factory edge and wasn't cutting how I prefer. I hit it with an Aizu, but that didn't quite nail it. Hit it with SG1K and that did the trick. I usually try the Aizu first and if that's not the ticket, then try SG1K, then SG500 if the 1K doesn't hit. Usually the 1K does the trick.
Like others have said, it deburred very easy and clean.
 
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