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Changing beliefs about knives

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tchan001

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The record spending for a kitchen knife is around USD250k. Original knives made by Bob Kramer routinely sell for 5-digit figures. There are quite a few members here who have collections of dozens of highend kitchen knives which start at several hundreds of dollars each. How do you view the world of knives now?

I was taught as a kid to avoid sharp knives as I could easily get cut. Now the aim is to keep good knives which stay sharper longer.
 

Corradobrit1

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Guys, I am new to this forum, even relatively new to Japanese knives, and I tell ya' my old misconceptions (from, say, a month or two ago) are changing fast. Going back to those very recent (innocent) days:

1) I thought I was a fanatic for spending $80 to $185 on each of my 6 or 10 most decent knives and for similar expenditures on sharpening stones and accessories. My wife frowns at my every acquisition and is still determined to convince me and everyone we know that I have a malady. Now I know that my minor knife obsession really is minor, and rather it is everyone else on KKF who are in need of rehab.

2) I thought all professional restaurant cooks and chefs (besides sushi chefs) use Victorinox or Mercer blades, or else use cheap or rented house knives that a service collects and resharpens for them every week. (When I mentioned to my wife that some restaurant professionals collected and routinely used $300+ knives at work she gave me that look that said "it's just not so, stupid.")

3) I thought well-to-do home cooks pretty much stuck to Shun and Global and Wustof (or Cutco, god forbid) and that their sharpening routine involved once a year dragging the blades through a Chef's Choice electric sharpener. It now seems that many of them, on the other hand, have pretty esoteric high end arsenals and stones.

4) I thought stainless steel knives were best since they did not rust. Now I know the ones that do rust are generally more expensive and have better edges and that their steel types are named after wrapping paper.

Now I realize I am small potatoes, that I am a mere budding enthusiast that knows nothing of the less commercial, or custom, or niche knife makers, or about asymmetrical microbeveling and thinning. I now know people actually buy $4000 kitchen knives, and that there are people who, just for fun I guess, own and have at home a dozen or more high-end wa-nakiris.

I have a lot to learn, and I hope not to go broke during the process.

Resistance is futile
PiedPiper1.jpg
 

M1k3

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Guys, I am new to this forum, even relatively new to Japanese knives, and I tell ya' my old misconceptions (from, say, a month or two ago) are changing fast. Going back to those very recent (innocent) days:

1) I thought I was a fanatic for spending $80 to $185 on each of my 6 or 10 most decent knives and for similar expenditures on sharpening stones and accessories. My wife frowns at my every acquisition and is still determined to convince me and everyone we know that I have a malady. Now I know that my minor knife obsession really is minor, and rather it is everyone else on KKF who are in need of rehab.

2) I thought all professional restaurant cooks and chefs (besides sushi chefs) use Victorinox or Mercer blades, or else use cheap or rented house knives that a service collects and resharpens for them every week. (When I mentioned to my wife that some restaurant professionals collected and routinely used $300+ knives at work she gave me that look that said "it's just not so, stupid.")

3) I thought well-to-do home cooks pretty much stuck to Shun and Global and Wustof (or Cutco, god forbid) and that their sharpening routine involved once a year dragging the blades through a Chef's Choice electric sharpener. It now seems that many of them, on the other hand, have pretty esoteric high end arsenals and stones.

4) I thought stainless steel knives were best since they did not rust. Now I know the ones that do rust are generally more expensive and have better edges and that their steel types are named after wrapping paper.

Now I realize I am small potatoes, that I am a mere budding enthusiast that knows nothing of the less commercial, or custom, or niche knife makers, or about asymmetrical microbeveling and thinning. I now know people actually buy $4000 kitchen knives, and that there are people who, just for fun I guess, own and have at home a dozen or more high-end wa-nakiris.

I have a lot to learn, and I hope not to go broke during the process.
1) Mine frowned also. The first one at $140 was REALLY expensive to her. And the $50 combo stone was also. Now it's just a matter of pacing and not going to extreme.

2) Most professionals use crap. Cheap dull whatever Sysco/U.S. Foods type stuff the place will buy. Then the smaller group of people that own their own of varying quality but never above the quality of Kiwi, Victorinox and other budget lines. Then there's smaller group that is on here.

3) 100% correct. Sorry Cuisinart and Calphalon.

4) Stainless is the best! It's the newest trend! Message me on how to properly dispose of those garbage non-stainless knives.
 

alterwisser

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Some of mine ....

1) Japanese knives are the best. Can’t be beaten, no way Jose!

2) I’ll never spend more than $200 on a knife

3) There’s a “best steel” out there

4) Cleavers are for whacking chicken bones

5) Cleavers are one dimensional

6) 50mm at the Heel is sufficient

7) I need a Suji

8) the Shop that shall not be named is the holy grail of kitchen knife sourcing

9) I only need 3 knives

10) should I really meet this young Swedish maker and buy a knife if his? I’m sure he’s not gonna amount to anything ... 🤪🤔
 

alterwisser

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By "cleavers" do you mean actual cleavers, or do you mean Chinese-style chef's knives?
ha, the point I was making: when I started out with knives I didn’t even know there was a Difference, meaning: I had no clue that Chinese are using Cleavers as all round chef knives. I only knew meat cleavers and thought that any cleaver is a meat cleaver ...
 

lechef

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When the tang of a knife is forced into the handle like a wedge, the ferrule stops the wood from splitting and cracking apart during use.
Ferrules should be made from something with high tensile strength. Brass and horn are popular.

The following pictures are about wood turning tools, but they apply to knives nonetheless.

May I ask where you got that knife guard
 

lechef

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I thought my Global G2 was the end game....and that it was as sharp as things get :eek:
Same here. Bought the whole Masahiro line(higher end version MAC) and thought I was Set for life.
Then somehow stumbled upon this Forum trying to figure out how to sharpen. Got introduced to a member that lived in my town. He let me borrow a knife and also try his Kato WH back in 2012 when you could actually buy them for a crazy deal on JNS. Was life changing to say the least.
 

Eloh

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well, at one point i thought that using a polishing steel was blasphemous, now i understand that it actually can be used very efficiently and sustainable ....

I also thought San Mai blades are the best and nowadays the majority of my knives are monosteel/honyaki
 
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Barashka

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1) It's just knives, how hard can it be to pick one
2) I'll never spend more than $250 on a knife
3) I only need 2 good knives
 

Chang

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"$75 for a knife? ridiculous! you have knives that cost more than $100?! you're nuts!"

"AS is the best steel"

"lasers make the best line knives"

"Shibata-san is such a god within the knife community"

"I would have to say Kurosaki is definitely my favorite maker"

"a 180mm bunka is all I need, I'm gonna start collecting bunkas!"
 

DrEriksson

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“This combo stone seems to be a good deal.”

Starting with Victorinox and jumping to Japanese knives, I thought I would never appreciate a Global knife. Now I really Like my G2 and GS11. They are my beater knives, they are easy to clean when messy, and they have a secure place in my collection.
 

JimMaple98

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KS is the best knife out there
woah that pull through sharpener is awesome!
i only Need one of each type of knife
its fine to cut on the marble bench top
carbon steel is scary
DaoVua are great bang for buck


....or how about this one when we where all so young and naive?
“Damascus is the ultimate steel, only master craftsmen can make Damascus knives and they cut so much better, people used to worship Damascus. A Damascus 300 mm chef knife would be the ultimate knife. Damascus is so cool, Damascus......”
 

DrEriksson

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“Damascus is the ultimate steel, only master craftsmen can make Damascus knives and they cut so much better, people used to worship Damascus. A Damascus 300 mm chef knife would be the ultimate knife. Damascus is so cool, Damascus......”
This one rings true. Now damascus seems to be a hassle, as it would probably discourage me from messing with the blade.
 

JimMaple98

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Personally, damascus was not even on my mind when started this hobby, now its one my my primary desires...but only handmade damascus.
It does look good when done right I will admit, but it has got to the point for me it makes some Knives look cheaper, simply due to the market being flooded with cheap crap dammy. only Reason I still have my damascus knife is because my partner bought it for me, not heartless enough to sell it
 

LUWerner

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You know, I was thinking about this issue, and as silly as it might sound to you guys, the thing that most flabbergasted me was the humble bread knife. Until the beginning of the pandemic, a dirt cheap supermarket-type bread knife was all I needed. Like everyone else, I started to cook more because of the pandemic, and then I got a good bread knife... Nothing fancy or even Japanese, but a good stamped-forged one.

Boy, was I surprised at how much I suffered before in vain! To the point I wasn't even very found of natural fermentation breads because they had those hard and difficult to cut crusts :oops:. Now I don't even ask the baker to pre-slice my loafs, since I can do a better job at home. And artisanal bread? It's basically all we eat now in terms of bread, from ciabatta do whole grain to campaigne bread.

I've learned many new truths in all the decades that I've been around blades, but honestly, I was amazed at what a simple bread knife can represent.
 

AFKitchenknivesguy

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It does look good when done right I will admit, but it has got to the point for me it makes some Knives look cheaper, simply due to the market being flooded with cheap crap dammy. only Reason I still have my damascus knife is because my partner bought it for me, not heartless enough to sell it
True, but I only get the best :)
 
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