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Check out my "new" chopping block

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JohnnyChance

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Sorry about the cell phone pic.



24" x 24" x 15.5"

Approximately 14,000lbs. Rough estimate.
Surface is a little wavy from previous amateur resurfacing job. Suggestions?
In the 1950's my grandfather (an architect) designed a new building for the local butcher shop. This was theirs and for whatever reason, they no longer wanted it and he fancied it so they gave it to him. It has been in storage for some time, figured it was time to put it to use.
 

jwpark

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I don't that's a chopping block. It's more of an execution block.

Wow, that's one big block.
 

WildBoar

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Cool! If it's too much of a PITA to keep around, you could cut that into 7 cutting boards, keeping a couple for yourself and pocketing some $$ by selling the rest!
 

99Limited

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If that block weighted 14,000lbs you'd need a crane to pick it up and that workmate would be crushed. :oops:
 

aaronsgibson

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Seriously did that thing come with a black hood :) Very nice. Lots of service out of that I'm betting.
I don't that's a chopping block. It's more of an execution block.

Wow, that's one big block.
 

steeley

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That is cool i used to have one at a place i worked .
they were throwing out a old one just could not fit in the car to take home back to San Diego.:dancecool:
 

Marko Tsourkan

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Sorry about the cell phone pic.



24" x 24" x 15.5"

Approximately 14,000lbs. Rough estimate.
Surface is a little wavy from previous amateur resurfacing job. Suggestions?
In the 1950's my grandfather (an architect) designed a new building for the local butcher shop. This was theirs and for whatever reason, they no longer wanted it and he fancied it so they gave it to him. It has been in storage for some time, figured it was time to put it to use.
14000LB sounds a bit high to me.
 

SpikeC

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What ya need is a miter plane and some time! A low angle bevel up hand plane would shave the end grain and give you a nice smooth surface devoid of abrasive particles that lurk in wait for your edges!
Or just chop away and not worry about it!
 

JohnnyChance

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Haha, it is probably somewhere around 150-200lbs. I was just exaggerating.
 

Potato42

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Wow, that sucker dwarfs even Andy's massive butcher block. So when are you planning on resurfacing it? Can we get some more pictures of it later, perhaps with something other than a cell phone? ;)

Speaking of blocks, I just back from visiting David at his shop. I guess I need to get busy on those photos...
 

Marko Tsourkan

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For resurfacing, your best bet will be a handheld belt sander - from the likes of Porter Cable or Bosch and a number of low grit belts to start. Once you flatten the surface, you can move onto an orbital sander.

M
 

JohnnyChance

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I have both of those, what grit should I start with and go to?
 

jheis

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I've a very similar rock maple block (except with about 4" x 4" legs). I'm guessing it weighs close to 300#.

The only way I can move it is to very carefully tip it over on its side and then turn it upside down so that the center of gravity is low & I can wedge a hand truck under it.

You do not want to get a finger pinched underneath it!

Bought mine at an auction house in SF about 30 years ago. As I was waiting for it to come up for bid, a guy in a white butcher's smock came in and took a seat. I figured I'd lose the auction to him, but I guess he must have been on his lunch break 'cause he got up and left before the butcher block came up. If I recall correctly, I got mine for $130.00.

James
 

Marko Tsourkan

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I would start with 50 or even 36 grit. You want to go as aggressive as you can removing material that would normally clog up finer belts (I take the block has been oiled). Use a belt cleaner stick, and you won't need as many belts. After that go to 80 grit. I don't think you need to go past 80, but if you insist, go to 100 and stop there.
 

JohnnyChance

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Thanks Marko. I am going to hit the sides a bit too just to even out the finish I bit. And smooth out a chip that you can see on one side in the middle of the top facing corner.
 

jheis

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You might try setting up a laser level on a tripod so that you can see where the high spots are - where you need to remove material - otherwise it's pretty hard to get things level with a handheld belt sander. At least for me.... :wink:

James
 

Lefty

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That thing is great!
50 grit eats quite a bit of wood. It would be my first instinct and if Marko suggests it, I agree 100%.
 

Marko Tsourkan

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Thanks Marko. I am going to hit the sides a bit too just to even out the finish I bit. And smooth out a chip that you can see on one side in the middle of the top facing corner.
John,
sides don't drop below 80 grit and do it with an orbit sander. Belt sander keep two hands on it. That thing can be beastly. One way to do it, is to keep it static, and sand in bursts.

M
 

JohnnyChance

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I do not have a laser level. I was going to put some sandpaper on a 2x4 longer than the block is wide and identify high spots by the scratch pattern. Like flattening a stone. Unless someone else has a better idea?
 

JohnnyChance

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John,
sides don't drop below 80 grit and do it with an orbit sander. Belt sander keep two hands on it. That thing can be beastly. One way to do it, is to keep it static, and sand in bursts.

M
Right, I was just going to refinish the sides a bit, not trying to take off lots of material off.
 

Tristan

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Hmm, sure you want to sand it any more? Looks a bit thin as it is.

Maybe if you stuck some of those non skid feet on the bottom it wouldn't move around when you are cutting fruit on it?

=P
 

99Limited

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What are you going to do for legs? That thing is so heavy it's going to need some Big Girl legs to hold it steady. Maybe a HD table with some drawers or a couple of shelves. Just to let you know, I'm envious. :drool:
 

BertMor

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What ya need is a miter plane and some time! A low angle bevel up hand plane would shave the end grain and give you a nice smooth surface devoid of abrasive particles that lurk in wait for your edges!
Or just chop away and not worry about it!
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO no mitre plane! I tried that years ago on a butcher block table we had at work, and it f&*ked it up something awful. If you want try a hand plane with a really sharp blade. Be careful about peaks and valleys. Sanders tend to leave divots.
 

Lefty

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Might this be worth a call to a good carpenter? I wouldn't want to mess up such a nice piece.
But, you can do it!!! :)
 

JohnnyChance

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My father build a base cabinet for it years ago that has 1 big drawer for pots and pans or whatever, and brings the block up to counter height.

It also has big holes on the under side for legs from when it was in the butcher's shop.
 

Potato42

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Just lob off the top of it with a chainsaw. You'll be done before you know it!:wink:
 

SpikeC

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NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO no mitre plane! I tried that years ago on a butcher block table we had at work, and it f&*ked it up something awful. If you want try a hand plane with a really sharp blade. Be careful about peaks and valleys. Sanders tend to leave divots.
Miter planes were designed for this sort of thing. That is why they were called "block" planes. If the plane is properly tuned and sharp it will work fine. If not fettled correctly it will be a nightmare.
 
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