Techniques Chicken stock

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reagan

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I’ve never added vinegar before. Going to have to try that. I have 4 carcasses saved up in the freezer right now so probably a good time to make some stock.
 

sidey

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Likewise never used vinegar, I’ll give it a try.
I never put salt in stock though, I’ve had bad results later after reducing it...
 

Dc2123

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The vinegar has always been around for ages in wellness books and such. It’s making a comeback because you’ll see it in bone broth recipes to help break down bones and release gelatin and collagen into the broth.



I’m with ya and always make my own chicken stock these days. I grab a whole chicken for around 12 bucks on average.

I mean think about what you get for that...


2 SKIN ON breasts
2 tenders
2 leg quarters
4 individual wings
Carcass which typically yields me 2-4 quarts of stock.

It’s so economical. And for those who don’t feel comfortable breaking down a chicken... well,
Practice practice practice. It’s cheap
And forgiving. If you “butcher” it then throw it into the stock pot.
 

ExistentialHero

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The vinegar has always been around for ages in wellness books and such. It’s making a comeback because you’ll see it in bone broth recipes to help break down bones and release gelatin and collagen into the broth.



I’m with ya and always make my own chicken stock these days. I grab a whole chicken for around 12 bucks on average.

I mean think about what you get for that...


2 SKIN ON breasts
2 tenders
2 leg quarters
4 individual wings
Carcass which typically yields me 2-4 quarts of stock.

It’s so economical. And for those who don’t feel comfortable breaking down a chicken... well,
Practice practice practice. It’s cheap
And forgiving. If you “butcher” it then throw it into the stock pot.
Breaking whole chickens is also an excellent excuse to buy a honesuki, in case your gyuto shelf is full and you still have the itch for a new knife :)
 

copacetic

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Breaking whole chickens is also an excellent excuse to buy a honesuki, in case your gyuto shelf is full and you still have the itch for a new knife :)
This. ⬆

Since I bought an Anryu honesuki, I just buy whole chickens, break them down and freeze them rather than pre-packed joints. End result is obtaining tastier, better quality chicken for the same price as buying supermarket stuff, and a carcass to make stock. I find my butchery skills are getting neater with each one I do, although far from an expert.

Using man-maths, the economics of it justified the knife purchase 👍
 

M1k3

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The vinegar has always been around for ages in wellness books and such. It’s making a comeback because you’ll see it in bone broth recipes to help break down bones and release gelatin and collagen into the broth.



I’m with ya and always make my own chicken stock these days. I grab a whole chicken for around 12 bucks on average.

I mean think about what you get for that...


2 SKIN ON breasts
2 tenders
2 leg quarters
4 individual wings
Carcass which typically yields me 2-4 quarts of stock.

It’s so economical. And for those who don’t feel comfortable breaking down a chicken... well,
Practice practice practice. It’s cheap
And forgiving. If you “butcher” it then throw it into the stock pot.
And 2 oysters!
 

ian

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Oh, you don't add the meat, tho, only the shells. More minerals that way. I hear Gwyneth does it that way at home, and has found it to increase the luster of her skin.
 

ian

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Yea, I only started taking them out in the last few months. Can’t believe I used to leave them in for the broth.... I usually take the rump off too.

Edit for full disclosure: Sometimes when the world is too much I’m lazy and don’t take either out. *runs away*
 

M1k3

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They are quite delicious. Small on portion size though.
 

Blerghle

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Haven't used vinegar in stock before, but I end up putting vinegar in damn near anything I use stock for anyway, so why not? All the more reason to keep using the Munetoshi butcher knife :)
 

Rangen

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If you have a nearby farm that sells their aged-out laying hens, they are definitely worth grabbing. They're often cheap, and the flavor they impart to stock is incomparable. I'd recommend a long simmer, though. I simmer 12 hours, turn off the heat when I go to bed, repeat the next day, and the next. You can keep going for another day or so, at which point you will be able to break the bones easily.

This is not for pristinely-clear soup stock. This is for stock to add to cooking to make it great.
 

Twigg

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Made this tonight and produced a wonderful stock. Thank you for the recipe! It is seriously good.
 

btbyrd

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IMO, adding vinegar only serves to ruin an otherwise fine product. The amount of vinegar you'd have to add to appreciably shift the pH of a gallon of stock is far more than people would want to add, and the addition of even small amounts of vinegar can cause the stock to taste vinegary (as acetic acid is volatile and easy to detect). I think it tastes bad. Vinegar is not needed to produce a gelatinous stock, and that is especially true if (as in the OP) the stock is prepared in a pressure cooker.
Any way you slice it, stock is not a good source of minerals, regardless of how long one cooks the bones (within normal parameters); the majority of calcium in broth comes from vegetables, not bone. I'd also recommend against using salt when preparing stock if it will be used for saucework (or any other application where the stock will be reduced). The vast majority of professional stock recipes don't include salt for this reason.
 

Bodine

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I am lazy, every Fri we buy a rotisserie chicken and break it down for various dishes during the week. Most importantly we use the bones to make stock for the week and freeze any leftover stock. I just simmer the bones for about 6 hours with some celery, and onion for plain stock, and add carrots, peppers and cabbage for vegetable stock. Never add salt or herbs until I use it in a dish.
 

Twigg

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IMO, adding vinegar only serves to ruin an otherwise fine product. The amount of vinegar you'd have to add to appreciably shift the pH of a gallon of stock is far more than people would want to add, and the addition of even small amounts of vinegar can cause the stock to taste vinegary (as acetic acid is volatile and easy to detect). I think it tastes bad. Vinegar is not needed to produce a gelatinous stock, and that is especially true if (as in the OP) the stock is prepared in a pressure cooker.
Any way you slice it, stock is not a good source of minerals, regardless of how long one cooks the bones (within normal parameters); the majority of calcium in broth comes from vegetables, not bone. I'd also recommend against using salt when preparing stock if it will be used for saucework (or any other application where the stock will be reduced). The vast majority of professional stock recipes don't include salt for this reason.
You may be right, but all I can say is I followed his technique and it was really good. I could not taste the vinegar. Perhaps my palate is inferior, but I was pleased with the result and am still thankful @ExistentialHero shared it.
 
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rickbern

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They are quite delicious. Small on portion size though.
You should try to sit down to a dinner of fish cheeks.

Somewhere along the line, she discussed a dinner made from 200 fish cheeks:


"In China, the fish is presented whole. At more informal meals, guests will pluck pieces of fish with their chopsticks, dip them into the soy sauce, and then eat. In more formal settings, a waitress may lift the top fillet from the fish and lay it on the dish, then remove the backbone with attached head and tail. If you do this, don’t forget to offer the fish cheeks to your most honored guest before you remove the head! "

Basically, if @Michi comes to my house for dinner, it's chicken oysters and fish cheeks.
 
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lumo

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I always supplement my chicken bones and trimmings with chicken feet, 50/50.
 

Bodine

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I have a neighbor who will come filet and clean my grouper, if I give him the cheeks, pretty good trade for both of us. OH and for an 8# grouper, the cheek is the size of a radish
 
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