Chilli Hotsauce

Discussion in 'Whats Cooking? Food, Drink, & Gear' started by Stonetherapy, Jun 3, 2019.

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  1. Jun 3, 2019 #1

    Stonetherapy

    Stonetherapy

    Stonetherapy

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    Have made two mind blowing batches of hotsauce using the 5 hottest chillies in the world a few years ago.
    Read a lot of info, boiled them up with garlic, kaffir lime leaves, lemongrass, ginger, salt, sugar, vinegar and blended, bottled and stored them for years. One half empty jar has sat in the refrigerator for about 8 years and I still am tempted to try it!
    Unfortunately my recipes and processes were random, and after a bout of Lyme-like illness I cannot remember them.
    I would like to ferment my latest batch of Carolina Reapers and make a sauce, but have never fermented chillies before. Looking for hints, tips, ratios and processes from those that have made fermented chilli sauce.
     
  2. Jun 3, 2019 #2

    Stonetherapy

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  3. Jun 3, 2019 #3

    chinacats

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    Funny, not a big fan of Reapers but one of the 2 patents is my favorite all time chile (Jonah 7-pot). Made lots of hot sauce but not by fermentation, be interested to hear ideas.

    My hot sauce preference involves carrots and garlic:)
     
  4. Jun 3, 2019 #4

    Stonetherapy

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    @chinacats, I agree, the 7 pots are delicious, and formed a large part of my sauces. I had chocolate, yellow and standard at the time.
    Another ripper that I do not remember the name of was bred by Monks at a monastry in California apparently a couple of hundred years ago. Not a super hot but had a tropical, fruity flavour. I still have some old seeds and will definitely be using it next summer for sauce, once I have my recipe. Was named Frittali or something similar from memory.
     
  5. Jun 3, 2019 #5

    chinacats

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    Oh, i didn't know the story but I'll bet you're speaking of Fatali (they also come in red and yellow but i prefer yellow). Still very hot iirc but extremely flavorful.

    BTW, I too have also grown Douglahs (brown Jonah varient) and yellows. All excellent 7-por varietals if you can moderate the heat enough for sharing;)
     
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  6. Jun 3, 2019 #6

    Stonetherapy

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    That would be the one! History according to my supplier was Monks have grown it in Cali for 200 years and we only 'discovered' it not long ago. Love a cool story.
    Yes it was the Douglah, heat moderation was not a priority back then, although you could only use a maximum of about half a tsp of sauce to 1 kg of meat!
    Reapers are super hot but less flavoursome in my experience so I hope fermentation helps to accentuate the flavour.
     
  7. Jun 3, 2019 #7

    Michi

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  8. Jun 3, 2019 #8

    Stonetherapy

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    Damn @Michi your google-fu is strong! Haven't seen this channel before but it looks handy, thanks.
     
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  9. Jun 3, 2019 #9

    Michi

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    It's all in that flick of the wrist… ;)
     
  10. Jun 16, 2019 #10

    DDPslice

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    1) cut peppers
    2) put in clean jar with brine solution, and veggies/herbs of choice
    3) add a cup of live ferment juice (it doesn't matter from what)
    4) store jar in dark place

    It's really that easy. I just did a batch with garlic cloves, shallots, green onion bulb, and parsley then post ferment, added culantro, more garlic and chives, white wine vinegar and lemon juice then blended and bottled.

    I make the fermented peppers in a gallon jar and use as a base and from that I portion out and blend herbs, spices, juices/vinegars for separate batches.
     
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  11. Jun 16, 2019 #11

    DamageInc

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    Fermented chili sauce? Check this out if you haven't already.

     
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  12. Jun 16, 2019 #12

    Stonetherapy

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    Thanks for the replies, great stuff, this is going to be interesting!
     
  13. Jun 17, 2019 #13

    Bert2368

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    I have not tried fermenting peppers yet, but did a lot of fermented cucumber pickles, cabbage and carrots last summer.

    I do make hot sauces though, usually with habaneros or ghost peppers (sometimes both). I'll dig out the recipe for the most recent iteration, sweet/hot and peach based.
     

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