Chopping Block Options

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by mobiledynamics, Nov 18, 2019.

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  1. Nov 18, 2019 #1

    mobiledynamics

    mobiledynamics

    mobiledynamics

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    Got too many boards to boot.....endgrains, sanituff, etc.

    Looking to try something different. Where should I be looking if I'm looking at a 16-20" -slice- of wood, as in 1 whole piece of wood slice vs. many-end-grains glued together.
     
  2. Nov 19, 2019 #2

    ACHiPo

    ACHiPo

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    Find a hardwood supplier in your area. They can cut it to length and plane it if it isn't already--board, live-edged slab--you choose. You can then take it home and watch it cup and split as it moves all over the place from nonuniform moisture.

    Why do you want a single slab of wood?
     
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  3. Nov 19, 2019 #3

    mobiledynamics

    mobiledynamics

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    I had a chopping block many many moons ago. From a local Asian houseware store. It was pretty stable. Can't remember of what material it was tho.
     
  4. Nov 19, 2019 #4

    Scribbled

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    I bought a traditional chinese chopping board (a rOund slice of ginkgo trunk) in the recent sales. I’m not completely sure how to germ ‘proof’ the outer ring of bark, and I’m not sure there’s much I can do to prevent future splitting, people here seem to view them as quasi disposable. Only $20 dollars though: a new baby has precluded more serious expenditures.
     
  5. Nov 19, 2019 #5
  6. Nov 20, 2019 #6

    ACHiPo

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  7. Nov 20, 2019 #7

    LostHighway

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    If you're using a bone chopper or Kau Kong chopper I think the Wok Shop rounds or something similar make sense. Using a Gyuto or Nakiri or maybe even a vegetable cleaver I'm less convinced.
     
  8. Nov 20, 2019 #8

    stringer

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    He wants end grain. Just a slab of it instead of a bunch of glued pieces. The Wok Shop is legit. I bet shipping on those monsters is obscene but they look sweet.


    I agree that you only need a board like that if you are consistently chopping through beef/pork/veal bones with a heavy duty cleaver. It's way overkill for gyutos and veggie cleavers. Even for chopping fish heads and splitting chickens it would be way more than you needed.
     
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  9. Nov 20, 2019 #9

    Noodle Soup

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    They prefer tamarind log sections in much of southern Asia. KKF members may remember some of my laments about not being able to bring home one of the large tamarind chopping blocks as they are extremely heavy. This thread started me searching again on the web where I found a number of new sources on the bay. I just ordered a 16x3-inch block straight from Thailand. Not cheap but I assume a lot of the price is actually shipping.
     
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  10. Nov 20, 2019 #10

    LostHighway

    LostHighway

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    The Janka hardness of Tamarind is 11,970N which is nearly twice that of hard (Sugar) Maple (6,450N). That would seem to suggest excellent durability but a surface that isn't especially kind to knives. Some people think Sugar Maple is harder than is desirable for Japanese knives. The Janka hardness of Hinoki for example is about one-third that of Sugar Maple, not that I would recommend Hinoki for heavy cleaver use.
     
  11. Nov 23, 2019 #11

    pentryumf

    pentryumf

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    Way back in my highschool days, my GF's mom had a ginger root board that was about 8" x 10" x 1.5". Apparently anti-microbial...to small for my prep work but was really striking to look at.
    Recently bought a Moritaka cleaver and the seller had this really sweet solid round board; he said it was a $16 at the local Asian grocery.
    But after reading and reading some more, a larch end grain mosaic is on my Christmas list.
     

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  12. Nov 25, 2019 #12

    Noodle Soup

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    Wow, my tamarind block really did show up straight from Thailand in about a week! Even had a note from customs they had opened the box for inspection. Looks like a good, heavy chopping block.
     
  13. Nov 25, 2019 #13

    dafox

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    Can you post a pic?
     
  14. Nov 25, 2019 #14

    Noodle Soup

    Noodle Soup

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    It would probably be easier to just look for them on the bay.
     
  15. Nov 25, 2019 #15

    dafox

    dafox

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    Ok thanks
     

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