Coarse stone for flattening bevels

Discussion in 'Sharpening Station' started by TRPV4, Jan 13, 2020.

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  1. Jan 13, 2020 #1

    TRPV4

    TRPV4

    TRPV4

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    Hi all I have about 25 dollars in amazon gift cards,
    Looking for a coarse stone to flatten the bevels on my knives.

    Comments on Shapton 320 and Cerax 320? (or any other stone you like)

    Cheers!
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2020
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  2. Jan 13, 2020 #2

    Garner Harrison

    Garner Harrison

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    I have the Cerax 320 on a combination stone and I may be a bit tough on it, but I personally despise the stone. The thing dishes like nuts and melts away when I use it, I see others have a great opinion on it but for me the thing isn't viable. I cant really compare it to any other 300 ish grit stones since I don't own any other ones, so my opinion isn't exactly worth much here ;)
     
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  3. Jan 13, 2020 #3

    TRPV4

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    That’s good man thanks
     
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  4. Jan 13, 2020 #4

    Garner Harrison

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    Then again, keep in mind Ive only used it for stainless steel knives which are super abrasion resistant.
     
  5. Jan 13, 2020 #5
    I have used the Pro 320 and I was not impressed. Fairly thirsty, dishes fast, but does not grind too fast. It does leave a rather even finish. To remove low spots on wide bevels I would personally prefer a stone that is not too soft, otherwise the stone will tend to mask shallow low spots and the mud may also tend to wash away the shinogi. The only hard-ish stone I have used that fits this category is JNS300, but one could also simply use the Shapton Pro 1000 as it is a really fast stone that does not dish fast.
     
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  6. Jan 14, 2020 #6

    M1k3

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    Sounds like it's the same as the Naniwa SS 220.

    OP, what kind of flattening setup do you have?

    King 300 is a cheap, slow dishing but needs surface refreshing option.

    Shapton Pro 220 dishes some what but cuts. Pro 120 needs surface refreshing at a lower grit periodically but cuts REALLY fast when not all glazed, loaded, abrasives dulled.

    And also Glass 500. Dishes fairly slowly, cuts good, doesn't really load up or anything. It's one of my favorite stones.

    That's all I really have experience with that's available on Amazon relatively inexpensive.
     
  7. Jan 14, 2020 #7

    Benuser

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    Shapton Glass 320 HR works quite well with carbons.
     
  8. Jan 16, 2020 at 9:10 PM #8

    vicv

    vicv

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    The naniwa 220ss is truly an awful stone. One of my first stones and almost caused me to give up on hand sharpening. Was so slow I built a belt grinder. I've now settled on a king 300 when I'm just sharpening and a Norton crystolon when I need to remove some serious metal. You can't beat that Norton stone
     
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  9. Jan 16, 2020 at 10:41 PM #9

    M1k3

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    I've found where it shines is after my Shapton Pro 120 to smooth out the scratches. And for old knives that have some rusting and pitting. But it's the worse for actual metal removal.
     
  10. Jan 16, 2020 at 11:07 PM #10

    DanielC

    DanielC

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    Nubatama Platinum 220. These were specially made for Ken Schwartz. Platinums are a hard, low wear stone that is wonderful for setting exact geometry. If I'm not grabbing an Atoma 140, it's the Nubatama. I think with shipping jt was around $120.

    I'm using these quite often*
     
  11. Jan 17, 2020 at 12:28 PM #11

    vicv

    vicv

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    I've never used it in a progression after another stone. Hmmm. I could see it having a use there as it does create quite an even finish
     
  12. Jan 17, 2020 at 1:28 PM #12

    Gjackson98

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    I have the exact same stone, and exact same experience. I purchased it to flatten my honyaki and after first use (1hr) I will say good 5% went away.
     
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  13. Jan 17, 2020 at 7:57 PM #13

    jacko9

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    I have the Cerax 320 and it dishes way too fast to be useful. I have the Sharpton Pro 320 and while I think it stays flat OK, it does cut slow. I have the Nubatama 180 Black and it really does a great job for removing metal fast and stays flat. I would have preferred to have had the Nubatama 220 Black but it was out of stock at the time I bought mine.
     
  14. Jan 17, 2020 at 8:40 PM #14

    bahamaroot

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    You've been buying some of Ken's BS. They are rebranded stones made by Imanishi. He is just a North American distributor. The same stones are sold by other resellers under Imanishi and different house names overseas.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2020 at 9:05 PM
  15. Jan 17, 2020 at 9:06 PM #15
    Would you happen to have some concrete details? I have not used any of these, but those I have seen in some sharpening videos did not look similar to other stones (that I am aware off). I am just curios.
     
  16. Jan 17, 2020 at 9:27 PM #16

    bahamaroot

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    I don't know about concrete but a very strong gut feeling.
    I have the Imanishi Pink Brick. A friend bought a Bamboo 220 Pink and it is obviously the same stone, same box. I know a guy that a few years ago was looking at some 15k stones and found that an Imanshi sold at Metalmasters at the time was identical to the Bamboo 15k, and again even had the same box.
    I vaguely remember reading somewhere some discussions about Bamboo stones and it was mentioned there too that the stones Ken get's were from Imanishi and Ken just puts the Bamboo stamp on them. I'll see if I can't find and link it.
    I don't know exactly how many of the Bamboo stones are available in the states under Imanishi or under other names abroad but I know that they aren't stones "made for Ken". Though he may be the only source in the States for many of them.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2020 at 9:42 PM
  17. Jan 17, 2020 at 9:48 PM #17

    jacko9

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    It doesn't matter if the stones are "made for Ken" or imported by his source. I have bought several Nubatama stones from him and they are top quality. The source is not important to me, the availability and quality of product for a reasonable price counts for me. I have the 150 bamboo. the 180 Black and the 1K xxHard that I bought for flattening the backs of my wood chisels. I also got a few Jnats from Ken and since he's close by I had him repair a blade with a lot of micro chips before I got into sharpening knives. I can't find another source for those stones in the USA.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2020 at 10:06 PM
  18. Jan 17, 2020 at 10:34 PM #18

    MrHiggins

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    I'm a big fan of my Nubetama Platinum stones (220, 600, 3000). Relevant to this thread, the 220 is hard and chalky (as opposed to creamy) feeling. It is VERY slow to dish and is great for setting bevels. It's pricy, though.
     
  19. Jan 17, 2020 at 11:18 PM #19

    jacko9

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    I agree it's pricy but, I have a 320 Cerax that wasn't real cheap and it's almost worthless to me so, I would rather pay for something I know I'm going to use for a long time.
     
  20. Jan 18, 2020 at 12:09 AM #20

    labor of love

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    Speaking of CKTG stuff...I have the yahiko “true grit” 240. It’s a pretty good stone overall. Mark says it’s made by sigma power, but honestly the sigma power 240 is better and cost $15-25 more.
     
  21. Jan 18, 2020 at 12:32 AM #21

    DanielC

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    Yea, I'm not overly concerned where he gets them. They are tools. I have the 220, 320, 600 and 1000 in platinum, and they have made me a fair bit of money. Paid for themselves ages ago.

    Anyway. Slow wear, aggressive, hard enough to facet from 220 to 1000.
     
  22. Jan 19, 2020 at 6:55 AM #22

    gman

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    i gave up on coarse stones because they melt away so quickly. i start with the DMT 2X and DMT X before switching to regular stones at 400 and up.

    not cheap but last a lot longer and don't require flattening.
     
  23. Jan 19, 2020 at 2:38 PM #23

    Benuser

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    If you don't mind some convexity automotive sandpaper is another option. In Europe, 'Metall' by Robert Bosch. I often start at P120. Hard rubber or soft wooden backing helps.
     
  24. Jan 19, 2020 at 3:32 PM #24

    vicv

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    Why would there be convexivity? If the backing is hard I've found it to grind very flat
     

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