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Could you guys pls check this TF Maboroshi?

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inferno

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i read somewhere that a chinese carbon fiber worker has a lifetime of around 2-3 years 😮 so its not really that healthy it seems.
 

Wahnamhong

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Just a quick update for posterity... I brought the Mabs back to the shop and the shop owner and myself went over the knife together. We also compared it to a Denka.

Conclusion was that the Mabs has a 'wavier' (for lack of a better word) grind than that particular Denka he had. Perfectly usable though. The shop owner gave me some more time to think it over, basically because he left for a vacation.
 

Corradobrit1

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Just a quick update for posterity... I brought the Mabs back to the shop and the shop owner and myself went over the knife together. We also compared it to a Denka.

Conclusion was that the Mabs has a 'wavier' (for lack of a better word) grind than that particular Denka he had. Perfectly usable though. The shop owner gave me some more time to think it over, basically because he left for a vacation.
So you both agree there are no over grinds near or on the edge?
 

nakiriknaifuwaifu

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Just a quick update for posterity... I brought the Mabs back to the shop and the shop owner and myself went over the knife together. We also compared it to a Denka.

Conclusion was that the Mabs has a 'wavier' (for lack of a better word) grind than that particular Denka he had. Perfectly usable though. The shop owner gave me some more time to think it over, basically because he left for a vacation.
great opportunity for you to pick up the denka :p
 

ModRQC

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At least he did help you and gave you some time - albeit self-helping in the process - to think about it.

This whole situation makes me wonder if there wouldn't be a way to assess how much work there is. Of course it wouldn't talk much about the "depth" of an overgrind, but possibly painting the bevel with washable marker and thinning on a towel wrapped around the stone? Where paint wasn't removed, one could use a caliper and try to see if any painted spot left is a real problem. I feel most overgrinds of your decently ground bevel is a matter of "undergrinds" surrounding it - where paint was removed is because the knife is thicker there, not ground enough, not necessarily ground too heavily where paint wasn't removed.
 

nakiriknaifuwaifu

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At least he did help you and gave you some time - albeit self-helping in the process - to think about it.

This whole situation makes me wonder if there wouldn't be a way to assess how much work there is. Of course it wouldn't talk much about the "depth" of an overgrind, but possibly painting the bevel with washable marker and thinning on a towel wrapped around the stone? Where paint wasn't removed, one could use a caliper and try to see if any painted spot left is a real problem. I feel most overgrinds of your decently ground bevel is a matter of "undergrinds" surrounding it - where paint was removed is because the knife is thicker there, not ground enough, not necessarily ground too heavily where paint wasn't removed.
This sounds like a fun idea. You'd want to try to reduce the give as much as possible with that set up though. I'd probably sharpie the blade road and rub it on a flat plank of balsa soaked in acetone or something like that (outside, and away from flame lol).
 

ModRQC

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Yes I was thinking of acetone too, and I think your idea could be usable - wearing a painter's mask and getting ready to spill a lot of acetone because this thing evaporates fast, and I wonder just how much the wood would suck it in to begin with. Edit: I would also be afraid of "smearing" from the initial liquid state, and just overall fumes once it starts to evaporate, could mess up with the result.

Rugged industrial hand towel paper wrapped around a stone? If marker is washable, it will probably pale from friction only.

Possibly the ink of newspaper could work to do the same?
 

M1k3

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Sharpie the bevels, use a loaded balsa strop.
 

ModRQC

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Never worked with loaded strops, but I'm assuming you understood that the goal was to do that without scratching or abrading anything, so that you know from experience that any compound won't visibly scratch?
 

M1k3

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Never worked with loaded strops, but I'm assuming you understood that the goal was to do that without scratching or abrading anything, so that you know from experience that any compound won't visibly scratch?
If you use a fine compound, it won't leave any scratches. Something like 1 micron or smaller diamond paste will slowly rub off the sharpie. If you keep at it, it'll make it shiny.
 

M1k3

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And if you go the balsa and paste method, once you're done checking the evenness, you'll have a handy little strop.
 

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