Curious about western profiled knives

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Danzo

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So, what’s good out there with the classic western shape? I picked up that little nogent on BST, and this non-gyuto shape has been intriguing.

I’ve tried the kramer carbon line. Cool knife with nice distal taper but the flat grind really turned me off.

I’ve not tried much beyond that, so what’s good?!
 

refcast

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Calton works well too

Asano kajiya is a japanese maker who does this profile and really great execution too, with the handle hybrid
 

McMan

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Picked up this Hoehler (S. Af. Maker) from EE a few months ago.
Really digging the knife. Beautiful f/f.
I tried a Kramer euroline for the first time and didn't mind the profile (though found the knife handle-heavy).
1631682208708.png
 

Benuser

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Robert Herder 1922 23cm chef's, C75W, 60Rc. Has kept the original profile of those days, which was very similar to the French one. Tip even lower than with modern Sabs.
Herder_1922.jpg
 

HumbleHomeCook

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Never used one myself but I've read a lot of positives on Warther Cutlery. CPM S45VN steel. I reckon the look is either take it or leave it.


North Arms Knives in Canada is another I've read good things about.
 

deskjockey

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I'm by no meaning an expert and probably not even a RKI.

With western 'factory' knives, I generally find them to be thick similar to the major German brands, and heavy with softer more stain-resistant steels, or really soft and flimsy if we are talking about the more common lines found in major retail chains.

You really have to go with a small boutique or true custom option to get something to come near a Japanese equivalent performance in the $100~$200 range.

Stay away from Cutco, Chef's Choice, etc. if you are looking for something that is going to outperform a Wusthoff or Henckels standard offering from the EU. I have heard the older Sabatier knives in carbon steel from France were pretty good.

If I was outside the USA and EU and wanted to try something, I would look to eBay and search the older carbon Sabatier options personally.
 

Benuser

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these are flat ground? hows the taper?
Spine goes from 3.5mm to 0.7. Strong distal taper, attenuated by a relative thickening at the last centimetres from the tip. It doesn't end with a flimsy tip.
Both sides have a slightly convex grind, the right one more than the left. Just like a Sab. Remarkably thin behind the edge.
 
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Danzo

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Spine goes from 3.5mm to 0.7. Strong distal taper, attenuated by a relative thickening at the last centimetres from the tip. It doesn't end with a flimsy tip.
Both sides have a slightly convex grind, the right one more than the left. Just like a Sab. Remarkably thin behind the edge.
nice, have you had to make any sort of modifications to the bolster? grinding it at an angle like some sabs?
 

Benuser

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nice, have you had to make any sort of modifications to the bolster? grinding it at an angle like some sabs?
IMG_20210916_041727.jpg
IMG_20210916_042636.jpg
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No, no need for it. The fingerguard comes out of the factory slightly above the edge. All I do so far is ignoring the first centimetre of the edge when sharpening. Some day it will be necessary to reduce the fingerguard. It ends very thin, as two joining arcs. It won't require more than a few strokes with a nail file.
There’s no need to cut it away as with some Sabs. With this model, it would feel to me as an unnecessary defiguration.
 

Benuser

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IMG_20210916_052224.jpg


As you see, with next serious sharpening — in half a year or so — a little correction may be considered. Not of the fingerguard. Haven't noticed accordeoning so far.
 
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