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nutmeg

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Beautiful octogonal wooden custom handle, never used and made of ebony, maple(?) and a third kind of wood. Sorry guys, I'm can't tell you much more..! (ebony is sure at least ;-)

max. 134*28*20 mm

$55 shipped worldwide with tracking number.


 

Lotmom

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You sure that's ebony? it has very defined grain. I can confirm, the other wood is maple
 

nutmeg

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Thanks, we have maple now!
I could bet it‘s ebony but I might be wrong..
Please guys, don‘t hesitate to comment if you are wood masters ;-)
 

Lotmom

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Thanks, we have maple now!
I could bet it‘s ebony but I might be wrong..
Please guys, don‘t hesitate to comment if you are wood masters ;-)
Is the handle finished with anything?
If you can use a card scraper on the dark stuff, I can confirm my suspicions that it's Cocobolo, the stuff has these beautiful purple and yellow-ey streaks before it oxidizes


Does the dark wood have an specific smell? sorta spicy or peppery?
 

RonB

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It looks like, (from the outside), maple, wenge, maple, possibly ebony, and repeat.
 

bahamaroot

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No, it does. Some people are quite allergic to cocobolo
It's not like this is a big problem and in most cases it is only the dust that causes allergic reactions for most people with wood allergies. People very rarely have allergic reactions from wood found in a finished product like a handle. Just don't sand it.
 
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Corradobrit1

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It's not like this is a big problem and in most cases it is only the dust that causes allergic reactions for most people with wood allergies. People very rarely have allergic reactions from wood found in a finished product like a handle. Just don't sand it.
Exactly. Its the dust thats the issue. Same is true for ironwood.
 

milkbaby

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The ferrule looks like oak burl with medullary rays on the end.
 

Corradobrit1

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The wavy banding on the dark wood is reminiscent of wenge to me.
 

nutmeg

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What’s the weight?

And there is no tang hole drilled, right?
Sorry, I don't have any scale now.
no, there is no tang hole drilled.
Really sorry for not being able to give more informations!
 

nutmeg

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Is the handle finished with anything?
If you can use a card scraper on the dark stuff, I can confirm my suspicions that it's Cocobolo, the stuff has these beautiful purple and yellow-ey streaks before it oxidizes


Does the dark wood have an specific smell? sorta spicy or peppery?
Actually I put a bit of linseed oil on it so I can't smell that much!
 

nutmeg

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Thanks for your comments!
 

Lotmom

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It's not like this is a big problem and in most cases it is only the dust that causes allergic reactions for most people with wood allergies. People very rarely have allergic reactions from wood found in a finished product like a handle. Just don't sand it.
I don't agree with that tbh. I was working with cocobolo for a slingshot handle I was making and for weeks afterwards I couldn't touch the stuff. Even the surface oils made my hands painful and itchy. I Personally wouldn't use cocobolo for food applications unless it is finished with CA or many layers of hardening oil, like tung
 

bm11

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Never heard of that. Cocobolo is pretty common for 1911 pistol grips, I don’t remember contact allergy ever being discussed.
 

bahamaroot

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I don't agree with that tbh. I was working with cocobolo for a slingshot handle I was making and for weeks afterwards I couldn't touch the stuff. Even the surface oils made my hands painful and itchy. I Personally wouldn't use cocobolo for food applications unless it is finished with CA or many layers of hardening oil, like tung
And you are a very rare case. And why stop with just cocobolo? There are other people with different wood allergies. Guess we should just use plastic for food application.
 
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milkbaby

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I don't agree with that tbh. I was working with cocobolo for a slingshot handle I was making and for weeks afterwards I couldn't touch the stuff. Even the surface oils made my hands painful and itchy. I Personally wouldn't use cocobolo for food applications unless it is finished with CA or many layers of hardening oil, like tung
You were sensitized from working with the wood. Somebody who doesn't actually work it by sanding, grinding, cutting it is much less likely to have a reaction.
 

Lotmom

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And you are a very rare case. And why stop with just cocobolo? There are other people with different wood allergies. Guess we should just use plastic for food application.
You were sensitized from working with the wood. Somebody who doesn't actually work it by sanding, grinding, cutting it is much less likely to have a reaction.
No, Cocobolo is a known sensitizer. If I hadn't been working with it, I would have been fine. But the idea of using a wood that has the possibility to cause allergic reactions through exposure? Not with my food, thank you.

From what I have seen, just about EVERYONE is allergic to cocobolo after prolonged exposure to its oils and dust.
It's a beautiful wood and makes great handles, just be sure to properly seal it.
It is most definitely safe to use, just likely not for makers that work with it. Use your cocobolo, enjoy it! It's a beautiful wood, just be aware of the possibility of allergies..

It's the same thing when I sharpen a carbon knife for a customer, I always ask if they are allergic to olive oil before rubbing the blade with it. It's better safe than sorry.
 

nutmeg

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I forgot to mention that the handle is gluten- and dairy free but not edible..! ;-)
 
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Lotmom

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I forgot to mention that the handle is gluten- and dairy free but not edible..! ;-)
I wouldn't be so sure, some wood glues are milk protein (casein) based ;)
 
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nutmeg

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That's probably the reason I always got headache at IKEA..
 

JoBone

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I’ll go with maple and Wenge too, the ferrule is a tougher one for me.

*********£

As far as Cocobolo, all rosewoods can cause sensitivities, but Lotmom is the first person I have heard of that has actually experienced it. By far and large it tends to be the dust that causes problems to some. Rosewoods are also more difficult to properly seal than other woods, as the oils prohibit the drying of sealing oils.

Saying that, Rosewoods are really loved by so many people. They have a nice feel to the hand, are naturally resistant to rot and pests, can be polished without the need of sealers; these are some of the reasons why they are so popular.

Unfortunately, Due to their popularity, rosewoods are restricted under CITES due to over harvesting and lost of habitats. For me, it extremely important to verify the CITES certification of sellers. That’s easier with wood dealers than it is with makers.
 

Tim Rowland

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I as well will have to say maple and wenge on the body, the ferrule much harder to determine as a lot of spalted woods look similar. by the grain my best guess would be oak because of the rays.
As others have mentioned yes cocobolo is a sensitizer and does have differing effects depending on the individual working with it.
I use a ton of cocobolo, primarily from Nicaragua and Mexico (different growing regions/different oil content) through only a handful of suppliers that have proper certification as Dalbergia Retusa is on the CITES and IUCN red list. I always wear proper respiratory equipment and have dust collection running at all time while using it...........that being said I have never had any type of sensitivity to it. I get more of a reaction from the oils of African blackwood. Everyone is different and oils/or dust will react differently to each individual.
In any case it is still perfectly fine to use on a kitchen knife as long as you are not grating the handle into your soup like a piece of nutmeg you will be fine.
 
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nutmeg

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$55 shipped worldwide
shipping is a large part of the price so depending on where you live, we can talk ;-)
 

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