Cutting board...Bamboo vs Oak

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by HappyamateurDK, Apr 13, 2019.

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  1. Apr 13, 2019 #1

    HappyamateurDK

    HappyamateurDK

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    Hi all.

    Over the years I have owned different cutting boards in Bamboo. I would say they where medium priced to expensive. Ofcourse in a forum like this " expensive "is relative.

    My problem is that sooner or later they will all dry out and crack, mostly within a year. That happens even though I oil them regularly. So I think of trying something else but Bamboo.

    I have come across a local Brand ( Denmark ) who makes cutting boards in oak. Is that a better material for cutting boards and will it last longer if oiled regularly?

    This is the board I am considering.

    https://www.skagerak.dk/dk/indoor/plank-cutting-board-s1990895

    Have a great weekend and happy cooking

    Søren
     
  2. Apr 13, 2019 #2

    Michi

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    Oak is probably better than bamboo, at least as far as your knife edges are concerned.

    From the description, it doesn't sound like that board is reversible. Do yourself a favour and, for general-purpose use, get a board without a juice groove. That groove becomes a royal pain in the butt. You can't just sweep things off the edge of the board into a pot or a bowl, and bits of food get eternally stuck in there, making it hard to clean. That's why pretty much all cutting boards (other than dedicated carving boards) do not have a groove.

    If you are really keen on a groove, get a board that is reversible and has the groove on only one side. That way, it's dual-purpose.
     
  3. Apr 13, 2019 #3

    HappyamateurDK

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    I actually prefer having juice grooves on all of my cutting boards. The groove doesn't bother me when chopping vegetables or other dry things. And I like to be able to use my boards for everything. Including roast and other thing that may drop juice.
     
  4. Apr 13, 2019 #4

    changy915

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    For that price why not a sanituff or other similar synthetic board?
     
  5. Apr 13, 2019 #5

    DitmasPork

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    My two fave types of cutting boards are maple end grain, http://www.theboardsmith.com makes the best IMO, made from an edible sap tree, they also ship internationally; I also have a good rubber cutting board, Sani-Tuff brand, which I use for meats (my wife's a vegetarian, so I have a dedicated meat board).

    I use a bamboo board at my parent's house, hate it, bad on my knife edge.
     
  6. Apr 13, 2019 #6

    Benuser

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  7. Apr 14, 2019 #7

    Michi

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    Is it the silica, or just the fact that bamboo is stupidly hard?

    It's definitely tough on knife edges though. I'm eagerly waiting for my custom board to replace my large bamboo one (which I'm using mostly with a softer board on top for the time being)…
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2019
  8. Apr 14, 2019 #8

    Ivan Hersh

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    I made this Oak cutting board over 40 years ago, when the surface needs resurfacing i just run my small orbital sander over it.

    It's been wet many times and has never cracked.
     

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  9. Apr 14, 2019 #9

    HRC_64

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    Bamboo is very hard, and has alot of glue required to assemble it.
    Also, it feels like playing basketball on concrete gym floor,
    the thin is hard, stiff, and has absolutely no give or feedback.

    ...I don't hate them, but agree your main board is better
    off in another material like EU Oak or whatever else is local to europe
    like beech wood.

    https://www.tastykitchenn.com/best-wood-for-cutting-board/#4_Beech

    Bamboo wood is good to great for portability, storage, and what not
    and for serving, or for cheese or bread boards etc...no worries.
     
  10. Apr 14, 2019 #10

    HappyamateurDK

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    Thanks a lot for all your inputs. when reading different articles on the internet I notice a lot of them mention oak as a bad material for cutting boards since the grains are to big, and it sucks too much water when washing them.

    But on the market here there are a lot of oak boards for sale, also from well reputed and expensive makers. Is that because European oak is different then oak from the rest of the world ?

    Søren
     
  11. Apr 14, 2019 #11

    TB_London

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    Mostly oak because oak became fashionable, beech edge grain makes a fine board, and being edge grain easy to smooth down with a handplane as the surface wears
     
  12. Apr 14, 2019 #12

    Grunt173

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    I love bamboo,it gives me a reason to sharpen my knives with a full progression.
     
  13. Apr 14, 2019 #13

    idemhj

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    + 1 for a decent edge grain board in beech. Since you are in Denmark you might consider this one:

    https://www.kunstogkokkentoj.dk/da/product/knive/skaerebraet-m-rille-boeg---l-50-b-30-cm

    I have the large one (60 x 30 cm), but without the groove. (If I were to buy today I would probably go for 75 x 40 cm, but you can’t get that seize with a groove.)
     
  14. Apr 14, 2019 #14

    Benuser

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    European Oak is a bit softer than American.
    If the end grain is properly made and maintained, the wood is saturated with oil and wax. It won't absorb water.
     
  15. Apr 14, 2019 #15

    Ivan Hersh

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    How doe's a bamboo cutting board compare to just using a plain water stone, for getting a blade sharp?
     
  16. Apr 14, 2019 #16

    Grunt173

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    Lol,good one. That's a great comeback.
     
  17. Apr 14, 2019 #17
    I actually bought one of these (not via Amazon though) for my parents. The quality is great, but the board feels harder than optimal.
     
  18. Apr 14, 2019 #18

    Ivan Hersh

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    Just wanted to get a little fun into this thread.
     
  19. Apr 14, 2019 #19

    OldJoeClarke

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  20. Apr 17, 2019 at 5:03 PM #20

    HappyamateurDK

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  21. Apr 17, 2019 at 5:41 PM #21

    Benuser

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    Teak: same silica problem as with bamboo IIRC.
     
  22. Apr 18, 2019 at 5:04 PM #22

    HappyamateurDK

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    How much impact will the silica problem have on my knives in reality? I use it maybe 3 or 4 times a week. For 20 minutes. Not 8 hours a day
     
  23. Apr 18, 2019 at 6:07 PM #23

    Benuser

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    Having used end grain bamboo and end grain European Oak at home, with soft Sabs, 60Rc Herders, 64Rc AS, SG-2, 4116, VG-10, I would say: three times less touching up, sharpening, waste of material, reducing the knife's life span.
     
  24. Apr 18, 2019 at 7:00 PM #24

    HappyamateurDK

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    But even though teak contains silica. Ain't teak softer then bamboo?
     
  25. Apr 18, 2019 at 7:04 PM #25

    Benuser

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    The wood's hardness isn't that relevant if the silica already abrades the edge.
     
  26. Apr 18, 2019 at 7:06 PM #26

    HappyamateurDK

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    Of course. Makes sense
     
  27. Apr 19, 2019 at 11:15 AM #27

    Tanalasta

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    I am absolutely in love with the Hagesawa boards. K&S carry them for Australian's. They've just so easy to clean, low maintenance and apparently meant to be anti-bacterial + kind on knife edges.

    It's not wood, but does anyone else have much experience with them?
     
  28. Apr 19, 2019 at 2:06 PM #28

    Noodle Soup

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    I've never used oak but bamboo sucks for Asian cleaver work. Chips and splinters rather than just making cuts in the surface.
     
  29. Apr 19, 2019 at 6:47 PM #29

    Patrick Gilmartin

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    I know you didnt ask, but I've never found any wood I like better than a hi-soft.
     
  30. Apr 19, 2019 at 7:52 PM #30

    CoteRotie

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    I completely agree, Hi-Soft (or maybe Sani-Tuff or equivalent) is the way to go for best performance and minimum edge wear.

    However they don't look as nice as wood boards, and decent performance with better looks seems like a fair tradeoff for a lot of people.

    I'll keep my Hi-Softs though :)
     

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