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Deburring methods

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Goorackerelite

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I’m trying to figure out different deburring methods. I’ve deburrd on whet stones and then tried strops. What’s your favorite way of doing this? There was even a video of a guy deburring using edge leading technique at a tall angle. I’ve tried that but had minimal success.
 

ian

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Typically, I will deburr with only edge leading strokes at a slightly higher angle than I was sharpening, on whatever stone I am finishing on. I also briefly deburr on every stone in my progression - like one or two edge leading strokes. After I finish on stones, I'll usually strop (edge trailing) on cereal box cardboard a few times, and perhaps run the edge through cork if I feel any small burr remnants. The cork only comes out with steels that form tenacious burrs, like crap stainless, though. I'll test for any remaining burr by slicing through some paper towel.

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Lots of methods work, though.

Edge leading vs edge trailing strokes from @stringer.


Lateral strokes from @JBroida


Fold over the burr and rip it away from @Kippington

 

Ruso

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On a similar note, when deburring on a muddy stone, is it best to remove the mud to create a clean surface, or keep the mud?
 

KingShapton

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Edge leading strokes on every stone until the burr is completely removed.

Sometimes I strop on bare leather after the finish-stone.
 

The Edge

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I deburr edge trailing on the last stone in my progression. If a burr is stubborn, I may use a leather strop and run through hard felt.

I've tried everything, but found that it all comes down to pressure control and time. A burr won't be ready to come off until it's ready to come off, so proper technique, and weakening it fully are paramount. Feeling both sides of the edge with our finger pads, using your finger nails, and looking at the edge through a loop during the entire process will help you see what's going on with more accuracy. Knowing what's happening at the edge is your greatest tool to figuring out what you still need to do.
 

JDC

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For me edge leading or the kippington method result in cleaner edges. Edge trailing on the other hand better preserves the toothiness.

While I really like it, one need to be very cautious on the pressure when using the kippington method, it can remove a lot of the bites if overdone.
 

tostadas

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I like doing Jon Broida's method, followed by the high angle debur like in Kipp's video.
 

Benuser

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Have been using stropping (edge trailing strokes) prior to deburring for years. And deburred with longitudinal strokes along the edge.
Only recently changed to edge leading strokes, exactly the inverse motion as with stropping. Much less likely to create a new burr when abrading the previous one. Took me some time to get it right, i.e. perform it precisely even with very little pressure. Has improved my sharpening a lot.
In some difficult cases, I apply a number of very short, small, light edge leading strokes, perpendicular to the edge, along its entire length.
I verify with my nail along both bevels whether it feels smooth in both directions.
 

billyO

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Recently, I was shown a video of a guy in NZ using a loose wheel on a buffer to remove the burr. I've tried it and it works pretty well.
 

Von blewitt

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Have been using stropping (edge trailing strokes) prior to deburring for years. And deburred with longitudinal strokes along the edge.
Only recently changed to edge leading strokes, exactly the inverse motion as with stropping. Much less likely to create a new burr when abrading the previous one. Took me some time to get it right, i.e. perform it precisely even with very little pressure. Has improved my sharpening a lot.
In some difficult cases, I apply a number of very short, small, light edge leading strokes, perpendicular to the edge, along its entire length.
I verify with my nail along both bevels whether it feels smooth in both directions.
What about the electric toothbrush?
 

btbyrd

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How do people feel about using felt blocks to deburr? Or a cork? These seem like easier solutions than trying to deburr with a stone, but perhaps they produce inferior results.
 

M1k3

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How do people feel about using felt blocks to deburr? Or a cork? These seem like easier solutions than trying to deburr with a stone, but perhaps they produce inferior results.
As a full solution, not really. It'll usually just fold over instead of coming off. But as part of the process, especially stubborn to deburr steels, yes, it works.
 

ian

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I'm always wary of ripping the burr off all at once, too, without properly weakening it, because I think it'll make the edge more ragged. I suspect this may be bullsh*t, but who knows..
 
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Kippington

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I'm always wary of ripping the burr off all at once, too, without properly weakening it, because I think it'll make the edge more ragged. I suspect this may be bullsh*t, but who knows..
Maybe, but you can resharpen (edge leading) after ripping the burr off to fix any ragged areas.
 

ian

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Maybe, but you can resharpen (edge leading) after ripping the burr off to fix any ragged areas.
Yea, true, I was talking more about a final cork deburring than something like your method when I wrote that.
 

Kippington

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Yea, true, I was thinking more about a final cork deburring than something like your method when I wrote that.
That method always felt a little suspect to me for that reason, plus it's not too consistent down the length of the edge.
 
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Benuser

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What about the electric toothbrush?
Well, it does work pretty good with coarse stones. With finer ones you're likely to round the edge if you don't take care.
It's part of the special treatment Krupp's 4116 get. Fast & dirty.
 
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