Difference Between Yu Kurosaki Knives?

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shaolinkaws

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I’m interested in buying a yu kurosaki sg2 knife, but I’d like to understand the difference between the various production series. For example, the Senko line seems to be the cheapest sg2 line, while the Fujin line is $100-$200 more expensive, and the Shizuki is in the middle. Why the difference in price if they all use sg2 for the steel? Are they made differently? Or is the sg2 in the Fujin line higher quality than the others?
 

Infrared

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The Senko line is the cheapest because it is the only one that's not hammer forged.

As for the Shizuku and Fujin, the SG2 steel will most likely be the same in all aspects. The only difference aside from the aesthetics might be the geometry (spine thickness, blade height, etc.).
 

Pie

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There’s some choil shot and grind comparisons between 3 different lines floating around somewhere on the internet. From what I remember there is noteworthy variation, but I’m also sure things have changed since that thread. Of course I don’t remember the details..
 

shaolinkaws

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The Senko line is the cheapest because it is the only one that's not hammer forged.

As for the Shizuku and Fujin, the SG2 steel will most likely be the same in all aspects. The only difference aside from the aesthetics might be the geometry (spine thickness, blade height, etc.).
thank you for that. when you say its not hammer forged, you mean its not forged by a handheld hammer but instead with a hammer machine? or some other method entirely? im new to high quality knives so this might be a silly question lol.
 

brimmergj

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There is a VG10 version and an AS version of the Fujin series. SG2 is used in a few other model lines, but not for a Fujin line
 

M1k3

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thank you for that. when you say its not hammer forged, you mean its not forged by a handheld hammer but instead with a hammer machine? or some other method entirely? im new to high quality knives so this might be a silly question lol.
No hammered finish.
 

Infrared

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thank you for that. when you say its not hammer forged, you mean its not forged by a handheld hammer but instead with a hammer machine? or some other method entirely? im new to high quality knives so this might be a silly question lol.

In the video above you can see him hammer forging. The Shizuku and Fujin line are made this way.

The Senko line is roll forged, meaning they are thinned and tapered with an automated machine.
 

Delat

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There is a VG10 version and an AS version of the Fujin series. SG2 is used in a few other model lines, but not for a Fujin line
Looks like there’s an SG2 version of the Fujin that’s hammered only (no damascus like the VG10). I have the Fujin AS and like it a lot.

 

big_adventure

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I have a Senko bunka and it's a fine little knife. It's my daughter's favorite prep knife and gets used a lot. Edge retention is truly excellent.
 

brimmergj

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Looks like there’s an SG2 version of the Fujin that’s hammered only (no damascus like the VG10). I have the Fujin AS and like it a lot.

I either never came across the SG2 version or just ignored them altogether in my quest for my AS version. Probably the latter and then I go and make a fool by thinking I know things. Maybe my wife is right...
Can't speak to the SG2, but the AS is quite nice
 

P3454NT

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Does this mean that the Senko line is of lower quality due to it being roll forged opposed to hand/hammer forged?
 

btbyrd

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It's made in a less labor intensive way. On Kurosaki's roll forged knives, the spine is of uniform thickness down the full length of the blade until you get to the grind near the tip. The geometry on these knives comes pretty much entirely from how they were ground; they start with a piece of machine-rolled metal of uniform thickness and grind the sides down to add the primary bevel.
Kurosaki's hammer forged blades are thicker near the handle and then thin out as you move toward the tip. This is a product of how the knife was hammered. The sides of the blade near the spine are not of uniform thickness either, and for the same reason. Hammer forged knives begin as a piece of bar stock of uniform thickness, which is heated and smashed under a power hammer and drawn out to the approximate shape of the final blade. The final shape is then cut (or stamped) out and then ground down to add the primary bevel. The geometry of these blades is a product of both forging and the grind.
Which one is "better"? I think neither is better; they're just different.
 

P3454NT

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Th
It's made in a less labor intensive way. On Kurosaki's roll forged knives, the spine is of uniform thickness down the full length of the blade until you get to the grind near the tip. The geometry on these knives comes pretty much entirely from how they were ground; they start with a piece of machine-rolled metal of uniform thickness and grind the sides down to add the primary bevel.
Kurosaki's hammer forged blades are thicker near the handle and then thin out as you move toward the tip. This is a product of how the knife was hammered. The sides of the blade near the spine are not of uniform thickness either, and for the same reason. Hammer forged knives begin as a piece of bar stock of uniform thickness, which is heated and smashed under a power hammer and drawn out to the approximate shape of the final blade. The final shape is then cut (or stamped) out and then ground down to add the primary bevel. The geometry of these blades is a product of both forging and the grind.
Which one is "better"? I think neither is better; they're just different.
Thanks for that detailed explanation. I knew a roll forged is somewhat more ‘automated’ than a hammer forged in that it’s less labor intensive. I guess I’m just curious to if there would be a difference in quality. I’m guessing it’s all really a personal preference? And also a “you get what you pay for” type scenario?
 

Delat

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I don’t think there’s any objective difference in quality. Hand or hammer forging isn’t intrinsically better than roll forging or stock removal.

Here’s a spine shot of my Fujin. Definitely has the typical thickness at the neck, but not much distal taper at all. I wasn’t even aware the Senko was roll forged but would have no hesitation with owning one if I preferred it to the Fujin for whatever reason.

87065183-00D8-4A61-BEB2-AA2D09C7B484.jpeg
 

P3454NT

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I don’t think there’s any objective difference in quality. Hand or hammer forging isn’t intrinsically better than roll forging or stock removal.

Here’s a spine shot of my Fujin. Definitely has the typical thickness at the neck, but not much distal taper at all. I wasn’t even aware the Senko was roll forged but would have no hesitation with owning one if I preferred it to the Fujin for whatever reason.

View attachment 142340
Thanks for the info and photo. It’s definitely changing the way I assumed roll forging is of lesser value/quality. I think there was just something at the thought that roll forged is “automated” that had put me off a little. Lol But so far, the most ppl seem to love Kurosaki’s knives regardless of what series it is.
 

silylanjie

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He also has a Rainbow Damascus line called Houou or Phoenix and he's currently working a batch HAP40 for November.
 

chefwp

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That’s interesting… so it’s just a Damascus type pattern?? Never knew that existed. Lol
I guess, but it is quite a unique look. Whenever I use mine I think about what my then-10-year-old daughter said about it. She said "It looks like trees and people sanding on the river bank as water flows by." And now that is what I also see...
shimo210.jpg
 

P3454NT

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I guess, but it is quite a unique look. Whenever I use mine I think about what my then-10-year-old daughter said about it. She said "It looks like trees and people sanding on the river bank as water flows by." And now that is what I also see...
View attachment 142355
Ha. That’s really cool. Now I can’t unsee that either. Lol
 
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P3454NT

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Also… I notice a “roll forge” type machinery in Blenheim Forge’s latest Insta video. Am I safe to assume that’s be the likely process/technique for most roll forged knives, including Kurosaki’s Senko line?

IG video here:
 

P3454NT

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So um... I caved in and purchased this...

And potentially may cancel on this (Senko series)
 
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