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Does anyone have any experience with permasoaking a kitayama.

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jwthaparc

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I'm hoping I can hear from someone that has tried it. I'm having trouble actually finding people talking about how it affected the stone. I don't mind permasoaking it. I have a few stones already soaking so it's not much of a big deal for me to do. Thanks.

Edit: screw it, I'll throw this in also. I'm looking at a 320 stone right now, and I can't decide between the cerax, and the shapton kuromaku. Any feedback on that would be great too.
 

Qapla'

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Edit: screw it, I'll throw this in also. I'm looking at a 320 stone right now, and I can't decide between the cerax, and the shapton kuromaku. Any feedback on that would be great too.
What do you think of the Shapton Glass 320?
 

adam92

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What do you think of the Shapton Glass 320?
I haved the kuromaku320, not hard i would said, like mine shapton glass 220 better, feel like more consistent scratch.
 

adam92

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What about the cerax 320?
I only have cerax 1000, can't said anything for 320, but as far as i know cerax series is quite soft & muddy.

Prefer shapton over cerax, but if you want to use for kasumi looks, then it will be different story.

Depand on your preference.
 

jwthaparc

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Repairs, and something to follow up my 120, when thinning, so it will be used to help finish knives too.
 

JBroida

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it effects it like all resinoid based stones... excuse the copy and paste, but this might help:

Resinoid based stones respond to soaking and drying differently from ceramic, clay based, and magnesia based stones. Magnesia based stones, like the chocera, will crack when over-soaked due to magnesia (the binding agent) leaching out in the water. After a while, the stone looses structural stability. Clay based and ceramic stones do not have any cracking problems unless dropped (or sometimes when they are worn thin and you exert too much pressure in an unsupported section). Vitrified stones work in a similar way to the ceramic and clay based stones, but are often less firm and can break more easily when dropped and/or worn too thin. Resinoid based stones, like the gesshin synthetic natural, 5000, and 6000 respond to soaking differently. The soaking is actually not the issue at all. Soaking helps soften the stone, causing it to release more abrasive more quickly, improving tactile feedback, and helping create more mud. However, repeated soaking and drying, drying too quickly, or changes in humidity based on environment cause the stone to dry out unevenly. Because resinoid based stones are not as porous, air can not penetrate as quickly, nor can water escape in the same way. As water leaves the outer portion of the stone, the loss of mass causes the outside of the stone to shrink faster than the inside of the stone, which is the main cause of cracking with stones like this. Therefore, when it comes to resinoid based stones, you need to pick one of the following ways of dealing with them:
  • soak permanently
  • use as a splash and go stone
  • soak and dry, but dry very carefully and slowly, while paying attention to general humidity
 

JBroida

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i totally disagree... i much prefer it permanently soaked... faster cutting, muddier, better tactile feel (less chalky/overly firm), and more consistent and even looking polish/finish
 

jwthaparc

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i totally disagree... i much prefer it permanently soaked... faster cutting, muddier, better tactile feel (less chalky/overly firm), and more consistent and even looking polish/finish
I went ahead and left mine in water some time around when I first posted this thread, and I totally agree. The feel is much different already. Definitely an improvement.
 
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