Dry Age at Home

Discussion in 'Whats Cooking? Food, Drink, & Gear' started by orangehero, Mar 17, 2019.

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  1. Mar 25, 2019 #31

    Michi

    Michi

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    Some people stick a battery-operated (small) fan into the fridge. I'm not sure how well that will work; the low temperature isn't great for batteries. It might be OK if the batteries are replaceable; you can charge one set while another one operates the fan, but I'd be prepared for daily battery changes.

    As an alternative, get a small computer fan and put that inside the fridge; these things are very cheap and draw little current, so you can run really thin wires through the door seal without creating too much of a temperature leak. (Feeding the wires in from the top seal is probably best.) Any run-of-the-mill power brick at the right voltage can be used to power the fan.
     
  2. Mar 25, 2019 #32

    Bill13

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    Yes the fan will help and is not a bad idea regardless of temp outside of the fridge, but it will not help remove the humidity/moisture building up within the fridge, for that you need the compressor to run. You need the warmer moist air to be blown across the chilled coils where the moisture drops out.: https://refrigeranthq.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/CR-BG-Central-Air-Browser-Illo-1024x656.jpg

    Same way that when you run the dehumidifier for you windshield in your car the AC compressor has to run, dropping your MPG.
     
  3. Mar 25, 2019 #33

    Michi

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    Agree, that make sense.
     
  4. Apr 25, 2019 #34

    Michi

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    So, this is how it emerged from the fridge after 36 days:
    IMG_2773.jpg
    There was a 28% weight reduction, which is what you'd more or less expect after that amount of time.

    No mould or bacterial growth, and no off smell. Just a clean beef smell, without any gamey notes. The outside surface was hard and dry, like hard leather, without any sliminess. Here it is after slicing:
    IMG_2775.JPG
    Here is the final result, with salad with a balsamic vinegar reduction, sprouts, garlic confit, and roast potato:
    IMG_2785.jpg
    Taste was really nice. Typical dry-aged beef: concentrated beef flavour, very tender, and only the faintest hint of gamey taste. No funky or off flavours.

    I don't know whether I will die yet, because I ate it only half an hour ago. I guess I'll find out soon. If you don't hear from me again, assume that the experiment went wrong.
     
  5. Apr 25, 2019 #35

    Kgp

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    Looks absolutely perfect! I need to google the garlic confit. Looks interesting.
    Ken
     
  6. Apr 25, 2019 #36

    5698k

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    That’s roughly the same result I’ve had in the past. Same color, and taste profile. One friend in particular didn’t care for the taste, but he’s not a fan of dry aged at all.

    These bags work, and they’re much simpler than a dedicated fridge.
     
  7. Apr 29, 2019 #37

    podzap

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    LIKE
     
  8. Apr 29, 2019 #38

    orangehero

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    It seems the umai bags can only accomplish dehydration of the meat, but not development of the funk of traditionally processed dry aged beef.
     
  9. Apr 29, 2019 #39

    Michi

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    Yes, that is probably right. There will be a little bit of “funk” because the meat isn’t sterile when it goes into the bag, but not as much as you often see with tradional dry ageing.
     
  10. Apr 30, 2019 #40

    lemeneid

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    I think maybe it’s because the aging isn’t long enough. “Funk” usually develops quite rapidly after day 50.

    Thanks for doing this experiment man. Think I’ll invest in a dry aging bag myself and try it out ;)
     
  11. Apr 30, 2019 #41

    mikaelsan

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    thats nice man, i've been trying some offbrand german bags, done two pieces of meat so far, only lost about 0.5% hydration pr day :( still came out as a good improvement though.
     
  12. May 1, 2019 #42

    Chef Doom

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    How much trimming did you do after slicing the steaks?
     
  13. May 1, 2019 #43

    Michi

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    About 2–3 mm, I'd say. Just enough to remove the hard and dry surface.
     
  14. May 1, 2019 #44

    Chef Doom

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    That is an acceptable loss. Sounds good.

    Can you do anything with those dry boys or do you just toss them to the dogs?
     
  15. May 2, 2019 #45

    Michi

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    I was wondering that, too. Last time, I threw the scraps away.

    I did some searches, and there are people who say that he scraps aren't worth keeping. Others claim that they are dangerous and you should never eat them. Yet others say that they often leave the crust on; apparently, it softens during cooking and gives a stronger "dry cure" taste.

    Some people use the cut-offs to make stock, but there are reports that it doesn't work so well. No bones and a lot of fat doesn't make for good stock. There are also suggestions for grinding up the cutoffs and mixing them with normal minced beef for hamburgers. That one could actually work well, I think.

    Next time, I'll try a steak with the crust on to see how it turns out. I'm pretty sure that, at least when aged in the bag, the crust isn't going to do any harm. It's just that I might decide that I don't like it.
     

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