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easiest way to put a heavy handle on a diet

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tk59

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I'm repurposing an old knife for a friend and it is handle heavy. It is only getting worse as I grind off more metal. Is there anything wrong with grinding the handle down to size too? I'd like to keep the knife intact as much as possible. Thanks!
 

El Pescador

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I imagine you could shorten the handle from the butt end with significant results in balance.
 

Delbert Ealy

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The fastest safe way to do this is with a big flat file. You can take off what you want relatively quickly without it being too fast. I would say you can reshape(or lighten it) in an hour or less and then some 400 grit sandpaper will clean up the scratches from there.
Del
 

wenus2

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lol.... "the fastest safe way" :goodevil:
 

tk59

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The fastest safe way to do this is with a big flat file. You can take off what you want relatively quickly without it being too fast. I would say you can reshape(or lighten it) in an hour or less and then some 400 grit sandpaper will clean up the scratches from there.
Del
Thanks, Del. ...and I appreciate you looking out for my safety and that of anyone that happens to read this. I take it the unsafe way to to take a belt grinder to it? :D
 

Dave Martell

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Does the handle have any fat that can be trimmed? Lots of stock handles are already too thin to begin with.
 

Delbert Ealy

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Thanks, Del. ...and I appreciate you looking out for my safety and that of anyone that happens to read this. I take it the unsafe way to to take a belt grinder to it? :D
Sometimes belt grinders remove alot more material than one might wish, and the difference between perfect and OH F&%$!! can be a matter of a second or two. Fresh belts are real eaters and dull belts are burners.
Del
 

StephanFowler

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Sometimes belt grinders remove alot more material than one might wish, and the difference between perfect and OH F&%$!! can be a matter of a second or two. Fresh belts are real eaters and dull belts are burners.
Del
also there is a LOT more dust to deal with and that adds respiratory protection to the equation
 

Benuser

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Does the handle have any fat that can be trimmed? Lots of stock handles are already too thin to begin with.
I guess at the back of most yo-handles there is enough that can be removed to correct a displaced balance, wouldn't you think? One or 2mm will mostly do.
 

kalaeb

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To keep the balance the similar when I re-handle (stabilized wood is generally heavier than the pakawood)., usually grind the tang beneath the last rivet, right where your pinky would rest...then I usually carve out some of the wood around the side of the scales right above where I just ground the tang. It generally looks pretty natural.
 

Benuser

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With a Herder I did it by removing some steel and natural wood at the end - or beginning - of the handle, shortening some of the curve. Very little was just enough. Wat's about pakka vs. stabilized??
 

tk59

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Well, I ground off a few mm of the end of the handle and reshaped it with a little belt grinder. I'll spend some time hand-sanding it down this weekend and see what happens. Thanks for the input!
 

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