Epoxy stabilizing/leveling bases

Kitchen Knife Forums

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums:

LostHighway

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2016
Messages
725
Reaction score
717
Location
Minnesota
In cases where a stone is substantially ( i.e. 1.5 cm+) not level and potentially unstable how do you handle the expoxy pour? Layers with some time to harden between pours? Fiberglass mesh drywall tape between layers? One big continuous pour with or without tape?
 

McMan

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2018
Messages
2,038
Reaction score
1,856
No idea about details, never done it. But one member did some neat examples, so search should help. I think it was @PalmRoyale
 

VICTOR J CREAZZI

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2019
Messages
226
Reaction score
199
Location
Denver area
Bed the stone in auto body filler either bonded to a piece of tile or something, or put duct tape on the flat surface to act as a release and have a bondo base. If you're embarrassed to tell people that you used auto body filler just tell them that it is polyester fixturing compound.
 

LostHighway

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2016
Messages
725
Reaction score
717
Location
Minnesota
Bed the stone in auto body filler either bonded to a piece of tile or something, or put duct tape on the flat surface to act as a release and have a bondo base. If you're embarrassed to tell people that you used auto body filler just tell them that it is polyester fixturing compound.
That seems like a slippery slope. After the bondo job I might start to think that some candy apple lacquer would look great as a sealant on the sides, then maybe a touch of pinstriping, ... From there it is only a small step to miniature hydraulics below the base.
 

cotedupy

Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2020
Messages
1,222
Reaction score
1,788
Location
South Australia
Bed the stone in auto body filler either bonded to a piece of tile or something, or put duct tape on the flat surface to act as a release and have a bondo base. If you're embarrassed to tell people that you used auto body filler just tell them that it is polyester fixturing compound.
Quick harden drywall compound works too. Easy to sand to level.
These are clever. I'm trying this kind've thing next time.

OP - If you are using epoxy then you could use almost anything as a wall - if you smear some oil or wax round the inside epoxy won't bond to it.
 

refcast

Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2018
Messages
499
Reaction score
247
use plastic wrap on top of the hydrated drywall compound. Place stone drywall-plastic wrap side down. Adjust the drywall mud to horizontal. Make it slightly wider at the base if you want that extra support. Let dry. Remove plastic wrap when done. Plastic wrap prevents stains on floor.
 

M1k3

Bbbbooooo!!!! Liar!!
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2018
Messages
5,542
Reaction score
7,348
That seems like a slippery slope. After the bondo job I might start to think that some candy apple lacquer would look great as a sealant on the sides, then maybe a touch of pinstriping, ... From there it is only a small step to miniature hydraulics below the base.
Don't forget the dingle berries and chain steering wheel. Shag carpeting also.
 

PalmRoyale

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2016
Messages
1,035
Reaction score
327
Location
The Netherlands
No idea about details, never done it. But one member did some neat examples, so search should help. I think it was @PalmRoyale
I've levelled several stones with epoxy. It's very easy, you take some painters tape and form a rim around the stone. Put it on a level surface and pour the epoxy on the bottom. Once the epoxy has fully hardened you can easily remove the tape again.
 

LostHighway

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2016
Messages
725
Reaction score
717
Location
Minnesota
I've levelled several stones with epoxy. It's very easy, you take some painters tape and form a rim around the stone. Put it on a level surface and pour the epoxy on the bottom. Once the epoxy has fully hardened you can easily remove the tape again.
Thanks, so no issues with curing/hardener if there is a relatively high volume?
 

Nemo

Staff member
Global Moderators
Joined
Oct 16, 2016
Messages
5,659
Reaction score
1,712
Location
NSW (Aus)
Thanks, so no issues with curing/hardener if there is a relatively high volume?
It definitely cures faster in thin (under 5mm) coats.

Also- don't use high strength epoxy. It takes ages to cure in this application.
 

PalmRoyale

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2016
Messages
1,035
Reaction score
327
Location
The Netherlands
You can safely pour up to 20mm with most epoxy resins, it just takes longer to fully harden. If it hasn't fully cured after a full day place it in a warm spot and leave it there another day.
 
Last edited:

Nemo

Staff member
Global Moderators
Joined
Oct 16, 2016
Messages
5,659
Reaction score
1,712
Location
NSW (Aus)
You can safely pour up to 20mm with most epoxy resins, it just takes longer to fully harden. If it hasn't fully cured after a full day place it in a warm spot and leave it there another day.
The high strength epoxy layer that I used was around 10 mm deep (maybe 15 mm at its deepest). It took over a week to harden in the height of a severe Aussie summer (40C plus daily with overnight minimums in high 20s).
 

natto

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2015
Messages
185
Reaction score
11
Location
Wilhelmsburg.de
On the right stone, the epoxy became hot and and the stone had a severe crack in the middle when fully hardened.
Curing is exotherm. Depending on volume, temperature and product it can burn. With little knowledge I like to be on the safe side. With casting resin there is a safe height.
 
Top