External blower range hood recs?

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ian

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Gonna buy one of them for over my 30” gas range. Gotta put in the ducts too.

This one looks attractive to me:


Any other recs for brands? hmm
 
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coxhaus

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Do they have a picture of the motor? I did not think you could do 1200 cfm through 8-inch pipe. It does not mean it would be a problem maybe just over stated by marketing. I went with Viking and with 8 inch you can't achieve 1200 cfm any way by Viking standards. You have to go to larger pipe. I have 8-inch pipe for my 36-inch Viking range and it works fine for me.

I installed my pipe but I already had a vent hole. My kitchen is on a single floor so the bigger pipe was no problem. I replaced a smaller vent with a 6-inch pipe.

Just the Viking remote motor back then was around $1700. I went with the standard motor which was under $700. You buy the motor separate from the range hood. The noise is less than my old smaller range hood. Also, Texas summers the attic will be 130 + degrees which I thought was too hot for a motor.

Here is a link talking about range hoods.
(32) Kitchen wall mount ducted hood advice | Kitchen Knife Forums
 
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ian

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I did not think you could do 1200 cfm through 8-inch pipe. It does not mean it would be a problem maybe just over stated by marketing. I went with Viking and with 8 inch you can't achieve 1200 cfm any way by Viking standards. You have to go to larger pipe. I have 8-inch pipe for my 36-inch Viking range and it works fine for me.
Yea I was surprised by that too. Probably I don‘t really need 1200, but mo flow mo bettah amiright!

Thanks for reminding me of that thread! Gonna go read it now.
 

MarcelNL

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distance from the stove to the hood is important for the effectivity of the extraction fan, as is having sufficient inflow of fresh air (you cannot extract 1200cfm if it's not also entering the room somewhere).

My decision was to simply do major stir frying and other gas guzzling fry-ups outside on a powerful propane burner, and be OK with a compromise extraction fan in the kitchen over the stove to keep the dB values in the acceptable range.
 

ian

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Hmmm, an appliance person is now telling me that it’s not worth getting an external blower if it’s only 15 ft from the stove, and that it wouldn’t cut down on noise at all. Does that seem accurate?

He seems to think Vent a Hood and Best are the two brands to look at here.
 

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depends on the wall construction, how the blower is mounted/isolated, how the duct is wrapped, etc. Sound deadening is a deep deep subject. I like ventahood. It's not magical like a restaurant hood but they do a good job. I like the miele external units as well. You'll probably need make up air and it may be required by code as well.
 

MarcelNL

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The more you stay in a laminar flow the better the hood works even at lower air volumes and the more silent it can operate BUT that is all in the realm of the designer and any bend duct outlet and motor affects that as well as the noise the motor and fan design make.

I suspect most hoods cannot operate in the realm of laminar flow, generally wider ducts with low resistance, as few bends as possible and large fans do best. That said, this brings so many design compromises for a hood in a home that I doubt the result is acceptable.
 

Lars

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My hood has a motor in the attic. One of the best features in my kitchen..!
 
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tostadas

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I have this one, purchased from a local retailer. The stainless baffles are nice to have in order to prevent tons of grease from getting into your fan and motor.

Higher CFM is generally better, even if you dont always use max setting. One recommendation I'd make is to buy a 36" hood for your 30" range. In retrospect, I should have designed my kitchen in that way. Otherwise, smoke oftentimes just goes around the hood edges when doing stuff like stir frying or high heat searing.
 
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rickbern

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Hmmm, an appliance person is now telling me that it’s not worth getting an external blower if it’s only 15 ft from the stove, and that it wouldn’t cut down on noise at all. Does thatooooooooooooooooooopopyi Asklkopoplolpoppllllppllpllllllllppppp seem accurate?

He seems to think Vent a Hood and Best are the two brands to look at here.
Ian, maybe call ventahood for pre sales support. I bet they know more about the capabilities of their product than the average appliance salesperson.
 
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ian

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One recommendation I'd make is to buy a 36" hood for your 30" range.
I think sadly I won’t do that this time. We already have all the cabinets built in and I don’t want to rip the adjacent ones out. Smart idea tho

I initially thought we’d have like all the money in the world for improvements, after the sale of our old home, but omg do the expenses stack up.
 

ian

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The more you stay in a laminar flow the better the hood works even at lower air volumes and the more silent it can operate BUT that is all in the realm of the designer and any bend duct outlet and motor affects that as well as the noise the motor and fan design make.
I’ve been wondering about the flow too, since my contractor seems to want to do 6x10 or 6x12 rectangular ducts instead of 8” or 10” round. (There’s a height limitation somewhere that would be annoying to avoid.) I keep wondering if it’ll make a big difference not to have round ducts.
 

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6x10 is 60 square inches, 6x12 is 72 square inches.
8 inch round is 50 square inches, 10 inch round is 78 square inches.

Not that much of a difference. Rectangular ducts are a little less efficient but, over a short distance, the difference will be negligible.
 

MarcelNL

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A round duct has less resistance than a squared one, but when they are well 'designed' they ought to have a higher square surface area to compensate for additional friction. If not (if you come up with the same cross dimension as a round pipe I'd simply pick the highest dimension you can get installed.

If that 8" pipe is sure good enough for the displacement volume of the fan of your choice (most fans are not able to create pressure and operate flow based so resistance needs to stay as low as possible) I'd go with the 6 by 12 (see below).
In the end it's always a compromise designing a kitchen...(we've just put together the plans for the to be built new house), so I hear you on the cost stacking up...(I'm trying to go straight up through the roof for the hood)

6 by 10 makes 60 square whatever (guess inches)
6 by 12 is 72
8 round makes 50 cross section surface area
10 round makes 78
 

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Minimize bends in ducts as well if possible. Each bend will reduce the flow, and the sharper the bend, the greater the reduction.
 

mdreb

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Always do external if you can. Make up air is required in more and more states and is not difficult to install.
 
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